Management and Marketing - Research Publications

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    Institutional Entrepreneurship and Change in Fields
    Hardy, C ; Maguire, S ; Greenwood, R ; Oliver, C ; Lawrence, T ; Meyer, RE (SAGE Publications Ltd, 2017)
    The SAGE Handbook of Organizational Institutionalism brings together extensive coverage of aspects of Institutional Theory and an array of top academic contributors.
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    The Janus Faces of Risk
    Hardy, C ; Maguire, S ; Gephart, C ; Miller, C ; Svedberg Helgesson, K (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2019)
    This volume provides a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the latest management and organizational research related to risk, crisis, and emergency management. It is the first volume to present these separate, but related disciplines together. Combined with a distinctly social and organizational science approach to the topics (as opposed to engineering or financial economics), the research presented here strengthens the intellectual foundations of the discipline while contributing to the development of the field.
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    Power and Process: The Production of 'Knowing' Subjects and 'Known' Objects
    Hardy, C ; Thomas, R ; Langley, A ; Tsoukas, H (Sage Publications, 2017-01-28)
    The SAGE Handbook of Process Organization Studies provides a comprehensive and timely overview of the field. This volume offers a compendium of perspectives on process thinking, process organizational theory, process research methodology and empirical applications. The emphasis is on a combination of pedagogical contributions and in-depth reviews of current thinking and research in each of the selected areas, combined with the development of agendas for future research. The Handbook is divided into five sections: Part One: Process Philosophy Part Two: Process Theory Part Three: Process Methodology Part Four: Process Applications Part Five: Process Perspectives
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    Riskwork: Three Scenarios from a Study of Industrial Chemicals in Canada
    Hardy, C ; Maguire, S ; Power, M (Oxford University Press, 2016)
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    Some dare call it power
    HARDY, C ; Clegg, ; Clegg, SR ; Hardy, C ; Lawrence, TB ; Nord, WR (Sage Publications, 2006)
    Power has typically been seen as the ability to get others to do what you want them to, if necessary, against their will (Weber 1978). This seemingly simple definition, which presents the negative, rather than the positive, aspects of power has been challenged, amended, critiqued, extended and rebuffed over the years but it, nonetheless, remains the statting point for a remarkably diverse body of literature. Behind it lies a series of important struggles, not just concerning different conceptualizations of power, and different traditions of social science, but also in the interplay between critical and managerialist thought as well as betvveen academic and practitioner discourses. There are, then, a multitude of different voices that speak to and of power and a variety of contradictory conceptualizations result. The two dominant voices the functionalist and the critical (to use simple categorizations) - rarely communicate with each other and refer to quite different lineages of earlier work. The former has adopted a managerialist orientation whose underlying assumptions are rarely articulated, much less critiqued. The result has been an apparently pragmatic concept, easy to use but also easy to abuse. The latter has confronted issues of domination and exploitation head on but, some would argue, in ways that appear to be increasingly less relevant. The aim of this chapter is to explore these different voices and to reflect on the changes that have occurred since the last incarnation of this chapter, 10 years ago. The first section explores the historical development of functionalist and critical voices. It discusses the broader heritage of Marx and Weber concerning power, followed by early management work on power. The second section shows how subsequent developments built on these respective approaches, in many respects, pulling them further apart. An analysis of this work shows how the different voices have continued to follow divergent trajectories. The third section focuses on the insights provided by Foucault, and the supposed end of sovereignty, which had such an impact on this field of study in the late 1980s and early 1990s, radically changing our understanding of power. The fourth section revisits power and resistance in the light of Foucault's influence to discuss some of the developments in this area over the last 10 years, as well as to connect with some previously neglected streams around Goffman's ideas concerning 'total institutions', which we believe are particularly relevant for making sense of some of the events that have shaped our lives in recent years.
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    Introduction: Organizational discourse: Exploring the field
    Grant, D ; Hardy, C ; Oswick, C ; Putnam, LL (SAGE Publications Ltd, 2004-01-01)
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    Power and change: A critical reflection
    HARDY, C ; CLEGG, S ; BOONSTRA, JJ (John Wiley & Sons, 2004)
    Power has typically been seen as the ability to get others to do what you want them to, if necessary, against their will (Weber, 1978). In the context of change, the use of power – by management – seems both logical and inevitable given the high risk of failure attributed to employee resistance noted in the opening chapter. If employees do not want to change, then managers must use power – the ability to make them change despite their disinclination – against their resistance. Yet behind this apparently straightforward understanding of the role of power and this ‘no nonsense’ approach to organizational change, lies a series of important struggles, not just about different conceptualizations of power, but also about the interplay between critical and managerial thought; and between academic and practitioner discourses. The aim of this chapter, therefore, is to provide an overview of the different ways in which power has been understood and to relate these different understandings to the literature in organizational change and the practical recommendations it provides for managing change. The first section explores the historical development of two traditions in the study of power: the broader heritage of Marx and Weber and the early management work on power. The second section then elaborates two diverging views and their underlying assumptions: critical theory, which draws and builds on the Marxian/Weberian heritage; and the more recent work in management which, for the most part, has adopted a very different conceptualization. The third section provides an analysis of the traditional organizational change literature to see how it accommodates these divergent assumptions. The fourth section focuses on the insights provided by Foucault, which have radically changed our understanding of power. The fifth section examines some of the more recent ideas in managing organizational change in the light of these insights.
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    Critical Perspectives on Collaboration
    Lotia, N ; Hardy, C (Oxford University Press, 2009-09-02)
    Abstract Inter-organizational relations (IORs) encompass a wide range of collaborative arrangements that are designed to achieve a variety of social and commercial purposes. This article focuses on one particular category of IOR collaboration, namely, cooperative IORs which rely on neither market nor hierarchical mechanisms of control to ensure cooperation and coordination and, instead, are negotiated in ongoing, communicative processes. This article discusses critical perspectives on collaboration which have moved from an interest in how individual partners might use power for their own interests to understanding the complex webs of power in which all collaborating actors are positioned. To do so, the article first briefly reviews some of the other approaches to collaboration. It then shows how critical perspectives differ from these approaches in some of their basic assumptions, and goes on to present some of the ways in which critical approaches have been applied to collaboration and to provide possible directions for future research.
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    Institutional entrepreneurship
    Maguire, S ; HARDY, C (Sage Publications, 2008)
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    Representation and reflexivity
    Clegg, SR ; Hardy, C (SAGE Publications Ltd, 2006-01-01)