Management and Marketing - Research Publications

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    Mechanisms of service ecosystem emergence: Exploring the case of public sector digital transformation
    Simmonds, H ; Gazley, A ; Kaartemo, V ; Renton, M ; Hooper, V (ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2021-12)
    This research extends literature on the emergence of service ecosystems by developing new theoretical insight and explanation into how service ecosystems experience change and stability over time. Empirically, our case study focuses on digital transformation in the New Zealand public sector and the enterprise services market in 2010–2017. The exploratory and illustrative study builds on 22 in-depth interviews and extensive document analysis. We reveal three key mechanisms of service ecosystem emergence: compression, ecotonal coupling, and refraction. These mechanisms contribute to overcoming conflationary theorizing and the value of emergence in service research by establishing emergent relationality and a processual intertwining of being and becoming. These become the basis of multi-levelled, multidimensional complexity and cumulative organizing. We conclude the work by discussing the paper's contribution to service research.
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    Towards a Bhaskarian Metatheory for Marketing Systems
    Simmonds, H (SAGE Publications, 2024)
    Marketing systems, while being pivotal to contemporary progress, have been linked to multifaceted global challenges, notably increasing inequalities and accelerated climate change repercussions. These challenges are not natural phenomena, but rather, human-induced crises, emerging predominantly from flawed systems of perception and action. Unfortunately, these flawed perspectives are also embedded within research and theoretical practices, leading to overly simplistic and disjointed results. This paper champions the introduction and application of corrective metatheories, specifically targeting these tendencies of reductionism, to bring coherence to the various domains of existence – be they subjective, intersubjective, interobjective, or objective. Using Roy Bhaskar's philosophy of critical realism, this paper elucidates how this particular metatheoretical approach can address the complexities inherent to marketing systems. Through Critical Realism, the paper aims to challenge reductionist narratives, critique societal shortcomings, and promotes both individual and collective potentials to support overall flourishing.
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    The ontology and epistemology shaping our understanding of inclusion: A critical review of the research literature on disability and inclusion
    Spivakovsky, C ; McVilly, K ; Zirnsak, T ; Ainsworth, S ; Graham, L ; Harrison, M ; Sojo Monzon, V ; Gale, L ; Genat, A (Wiley, 2023-06-29)
    People with disability continue to face barriers to substantive and meaningfulinclusion in accommodation and community settings. The aim of this system-atic review was to examine the characteristics of the literature on‘inclusion’,‘integration’,‘exclusion’, and‘segregation’for people with disability inaccommodation and community settings. This literature is important becauseit provides the evidence base that informs policy and practice. We identified457 articles that primarily related to the experiences of people with intellectualdisability and psycho-social disability.We found: (1) the volume of publicationsrelating to the‘inclusion’,‘integration’,‘exclusion’and‘segregation’of peoplewith disability in accommodation and community living settings has increasedeach year since 2006; (2) high-income western countries were overrepresented inresearch outputs; (3) most research has been undertaken in the health sciences;(4) only 30% of literature directly engaged with people with disability; (5) lessthan 50% of the publications we reviewed (223 out of 457 manuscripts) identifiedinclusion, integration, exclusion andsegregation as their primary focus; (6)‘inclu-sion’,‘integration’,‘exclusion’and‘segregation’were predominantly used in thecontext of specific populations—psycho-social disability and intellectual disabil-ity; (7) there is great variation in the attention paid to the experiences of differentcommunities of people with disability; and (8) the notable absence of currentscholarly literature on the experiences and outcomes of people with disability liv-ing at home with parents and/or siblings. Each of these findings have importantimplications for the research agenda, policy, and practice
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    Addressing Climate Change with Behavioral Science: A Global Intervention Tournament in 63 Countries
    Chow, D (American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2024)
    Effectively reducing climate change requires dramatic, global behavior change. Yet it is unclear which strategies are most likely to motivate people to change their climate beliefs and behaviors. Here, we tested 11 expert-crowdsourced interventions on four climate mitigation outcomes: beliefs, policy support, information sharing intention, and an effortful tree-planting behavioral task. Across 59,440 participants from 63 countries, the interventions’ effectiveness was small, largely limited to non-climate-skeptics, and differed across outcomes: Beliefs were strengthened most by decreasing psychological distance (by 2.3%), policy support by writing a letter to a future generation member (2.6%), information sharing by negative emotion induction (12.1%), and no intervention increased the more effortful behavior–several interventions even reduced tree planting. Finally, the effects of each intervention differed depending on people’s initial climate beliefs. These findings suggest that the impact of behavioral climate interventions varies across audiences and target behaviors.
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    How does fairness promote innovative behavior in organizational change?: The importance of social context
    Kim, M ; Choi, D ; Guay, RP ; Chen, A (Wiley, 2023)
    This study examined how and when employee perceptions of change fairness increase their engagement in innovative behavior during organizational change. Drawing upon fairness heuristic theory, we suggest that change fairness plays a pivotal role as a key heuristic about trustworthiness of leaders and managers in motivating employees to engage in innovative behavior. We also suggest that this change fairness effect becomes stronger or weaker depending on social contexts (change norms, change norm strength, and status differentiation) within a group. Our findings from survey data (N = 318; 35 teams) supported our hypotheses, showing that change fairness is positively related to innovative behavior and that this relationship becomes weaker when (a) group members demonstrate supportive behaviors for the planned change on average (positive change norms), (b) all group members uniformly demonstrate change-supportive behaviors (strong change norms), and (c) group members' social status perceptions are similar (low status differentiation). We provide insights into theory development and change implementation in practice by highlighting the crucial role of fairness as a key decision heuristic about the trustworthiness of management and demonstrating how social contexts substitute the fairness effect on innovative behavior.
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    Anti-racism as an organising principle: Racial inequality in and around organisations
    Evans, M ; Liu, H ; Sojo, V ; Heyden, M (SAGE Publications, 2024)
    We start this special issue with an acknowledgement of the Traditional Owners of the Land on which we, the four co-editors, live and write: the Wiradjuri people of the southern Wiradjuri Nation lands, the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation and the Kombumerri people of the Yugambeh language region. Sovereignty was never ceded. We are stuck. Let’s face it. Stuck inside the belly of the colonial project (i.e. powerful ethno-nations’ practices of dispossession of land, settling of their people on the conquered territory and domination of the original custodians of the land through violent, structural and normative means). Even now, especially now, the aims of the colonial project reverberate across our society, our institutions and our organisations and shape our lives. Those aims were brought to these shores with the purpose of extinguishing what already existed. The wholesale denial of First National sovereignty, cultures, languages, livelihoods and humanity lay a veneer over colonised countries. This false foundation is the canvas on which the business model of the colonial project has taken root (O’Sullivan, 2021), with its business strategies settler colonialism, extractive colonialism, missionary colonialism (Shoemaker, 2015), making money and setting the pace for what success looks like in the colonised nations. [From Introduction to the special issue]
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    Information or pressure? The effect of director experience on CEO CSR compensation adoption and design
    Li, Z ; Yang, L (Wiley, 2023)
    We investigate the impact of director experience in integrating social responsibility criteria into CEO compensation (corporate social responsibility [CSR] contracting) in other firms on the adoption and design of CSR contracting within focal firms and address the question of whether such experience brings information or pressure to focal firms. Using hand‐collected data of a sample from the Standard and Poor's (S&P) 500 index, we find that director experience is positively associated with the likelihood of CSR contracting adoption. This effect is particularly pronounced in challenging situations where firms require more information for the adoption, such as when they have diverse stakeholders with varying CSR interests and operate in unpredictable market environments. Additionally, director experience has a positive effect on the use of quantitative CSR targets in initial contract design, especially in these challenging scenarios. Interestingly, the positive effect of director experience on CSR contracting adoption does not vary with firms’ peer legitimacy pressure. Our findings suggest that director CSR contracting experience provides valuable information that fosters learning rather than imposing institutional pressure that leads to isomorphism when firms make CSR contracting decisions. By disentangling the intertwined role of director experience, our research offers insights into how it influences the adoption and design of innovative management control practices within firms.
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    How fear of Covid‐19 predicts differential attitudes between nonphysician healthcare workers and other essential occupations
    Ng, GTT ; Chow, DYL (Wiley, 2023-11-30)
    We examine two competing hypotheses about how individual differences in fear of Covid‐19 influence attitudes toward nurses, hospital janitors and garbage collectors. On one hand, fear of Covid‐19 can predict less warmth toward nurses because fear may lead to avoidance and contempt. On the other hand, fear of Covid‐19 can predict greater warmth toward nurses because greater fear of Covid‐19 could alternatively imply greater cognizance of the contribution that nurses make, and the risk they undertake. Also, we hypothesize that fear of Covid‐19 does not predict greater warmth toward hospital janitors or garbage collectors. Findings of two studies (cross‐sectional and longitudinal) generally showed that increased fear of Covid‐19 (mainly on the psychological dimension) predicted greater warmth toward nurses, but not toward hospital janitors and garbage collectors. In the pandemic context, it appears that healthcare workers directly involved in patient care are not so much stigmatized, as appreciated, for their risk and contribution. However, other essential workers that are not involved in direct patient care appear less valued.
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    Taking the long view of the multinational
    Sammartino, A ; Merrett, D ; van der Eng, P ; Ville, S (EMERALD GROUP PUBLISHING LTD, 2023-03-20)
    Purpose This paper argues for the benefits to international business (IB) of taking a much longer view at the engagement by multinational enterprises (MNEs) with host locations. Design/methodology/approach The authors showcase a project tracking the engagement by MNEs with Australia over the past two centuries. Extensive archival work has been undertaken to identify and document modes of entry, home countries, industries, operational modes and company types among the MNEs operating in Australia. The authors also describe the shifting nature of Australia as a host location. Findings The authors demonstrate the historical and ongoing diversity of ways in which MNEs interact with a host. They show that different organisational forms have prevailed over time, and that considerable operational mode changes can best be observed when a long lens is adopted. The authors show how these mode changes interact with host country dynamics, and also the broader context of the MNE and its altering strategies. Research limitations/implications The authors urge IB scholars to embrace longer timeframes to capture the complexity of MNEs’ growth and adaptation more meaningfully. Originality/value By taking such a long-run perspective, the authors shed new light on the importance of moving beyond simple snapshots to analyse key IB constructs and phenomenon.
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    Toward a "human being to commodity model" as an explanation for men's violent, sexual consumption of women
    Yeh, MA ; Eilert, M ; Vlahos, A ; Baker, SM ; Stovall, T (WILEY, 2021-09)
    Abstract This research proposes a consumer behavior model that highlights how women may be valuated across a continuum of living human being to commodity. We use the social epidemic of men's sexual violence against women to build a model that reframes sexual violence as men's violent consumption of women. Our model describes the process through which men can think about women as a commodity. We propose different paths through which commoditization occurs—men perceiving women as instrumental, interchangeable, and violable, as well as denying their subjectivity and autonomy—which can lead to violent consumption (the commitment of sexual violence). While sexual violence is a complex problem that defies easy solutions, we believe our nuanced and concrete model is more informative to actions to stop sexual violence than existing theories. We also discuss the role of other factors, including the marketplace, in enabling, attenuating, and reversing this process.