Management and Marketing - Research Publications

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    Aortic Elastic Properties and Myocardial Performance Index Are Impaired in Patients with Lichen Planus.
    Koseoglu, C ; Erdogan, M ; Ertem, AG ; Koseoglu, G ; Akoglu, G ; Aktas, A ; Ozdemir, E ; Kurmus, O ; Durmaz, T ; Keles, T ; Bozkurt, E (S. Karger AG, 2016)
    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the elastic properties of the aorta and the myocardial performance index of the left ventricle (LV) in patients with lichen planus (LP). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 54 patients with LP and 50 controls were enrolled in the study. The 2 groups were well-matched regarding age, gender, body mass index, any smoking history, diabetes mellitus and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP). The echocardiographic examination was performed on the study subjects and the controls. Aortic elasticity parameters and the myocardial performance index of the LV were calculated. The Student t test, the x03C7;2 test and multiple linear regression were used for the statistical analysis. RESULTS: Aortic strain (AS, 4.77 ± 1.81 vs. 8.95 ± 2.22; p < 0.001) and aortic distensibility (AD, 0.25 ± 0.009 vs. 0.42 ± 0.120; p < 0.001) were significantly lower, and aortic stiffness index β (ASIβ, 3.65 ± 1.03 vs. 2.70 ± 0.91; p < 0.001) was significantly higher in the LP group than in the controls. The myocardial performance index (Tei index) was significantly higher in the LP group than in the control group (p = 0.001). The duration of the LP was negatively correlated with AS (r = -0.364, p < 0.001) and AD (r = -0.279, p = 0.006), and positively correlated with the Tei index (r = 0.324, p = 0.001) and ASIβ (r = 0.364, p < 0.001). After adjustment for relevant confounders (age, male gender, smoking, SBP, DBP, diabetes mellitus and low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), LP and its duration were still associated with AS, AD and ASIβ. CONCLUSION: In this study, AS and AD were lower and ASIβ and myocardial performance index higher in LP patients than in controls.
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    Comparative assessment of embodied energy of recycled aggregate concrete
    Wijayasundara, M ; Crawford, RH ; Mendis, P (Elsevier, 2017)
    Concrete waste can be recycled to produce an aggregate product; referred to as recycled concrete aggregate (RCA). While RCA is mainly used as a road base filler material, it has the potential to replace natural coarse aggregate (NA) in structural concrete. In determining the environmental performance of the resultant concrete product from this substitution, referred to as recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) against its counterpart, natural aggregate concrete (NAC), it is important to consider the effects of the entire life cycle including the upstream processes associated with each. This paper evaluates “cradle-to-gate” embodied energy (EE) of RAC received at a construction site, in comparison to NAC, using the input-output-based hybrid approach, using an Australian context. The paper constructs a model to evaluate EE of RAC and analyses the incremental energy of RAC as opposed to NAC, to identify what contribute to the difference out of four primary factors discussed in previous research. It was found that the EE of RAC is marginally different to that of NAC by +2.1 to −1.1%, and the variation was subject to the magnitude and direction of the four factors considered. The mix composition, primarily the binder composition, was found to have the highest contribution to the difference, significantly standing out from the direct energy difference between RCA and NA, difference of sourcing distance between RCA and NA and the difference of direct manufacturing energy between RAC and NAC.
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    Methodology for the integrated assessment on the use of recycled concrete aggregate replacing natural aggregate in structural concrete
    Wijayasundara, M ; Mendis, P ; Crawford, RH (Elsevier, 2017)
    Recycled concrete waste in the form of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) is presently used mostly as a road base filler in Australia. However, instead of producing natural aggregate (NA) to manufacture natural aggregate concrete (NAC) to use in structural concrete, there is potential to use RCA to manufacture recycled aggregate concrete (RAC). While the material performance of RAC compared to NAC is analysed in the existing literature, it is not evident whether the use of RCA in structural concrete results in financial and environmental benefits. Previous literature analysing these aspects mostly focuses on a single area of investigation. This paper presents an integrated methodology for the assessment of the use of RCA replacing NA in structural concrete, considering technical, financial, environmental and social perspectives. Cost-benefit assessment (CBA) has been used to evaluate the internalised impacts as well as external costs concerning the use of both RAC and NAC. The scope of each discipline-focused assessment is presented demarcating the relevant scope for further study, and the specific tools and methodologies to be adopted are specified. Finally, amalgamating the different discipline-focused assessments, a unique approach for comparing a sustainable, alternative raw material for concrete, is presented in this paper.
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    Integrated assessment of the use of recycled concrete aggregate replacing natural aggregate in structural concrete
    Wijayasundara, M ; Mendis, P ; Crawford, RH (Elsevier, 2018)
    The use of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) replacing natural aggregate (NA) to produce concrete named as recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) has gained increased importance in the last few decades. Despite many visible advantages associated with the initiative, RAC is not manufactured at commercial scale to replace natural aggregate concrete (NAC) used as structural concrete in Australia presently. To identify whether the production of RAC should be favoured against NAC, an integrated assessment combining multiple criteria is essential as the previous research findings provide mixed outcomes on financial viability, product performance and environmental performance. This paper uses an integrated assessment methodology employing cost-benefit analysis (CBA) which combines the financial, direct and indirect environmental, social outcomes associated with the initiative to evaluate its suitability. By combining several qualitative and quantitative studies published by the author/s, an integral result to compare the use of RCA replacing NA in structural applications is conducted in this study. Net present value (NPV) to society associated with a unit volume of RAC is evaluated as a representative indicator to compare RAC against NAC in this paper. The results state that a unit volume of RAC results in a positive NPV of 4.2–6.0% of the price of NAC for 30% replacement (and 16.3–22.6% for 100%), prior to being used in a building r. Simulation of application of the RAC to two case study buildings indicate that the average price of concrete used in the buildings is decreased by 4.1–6.1%. The results indicate that, if the external benefit associated with the production of RAC is internalised and passed on to the purchaser of the product, production of RAC in structural buildings result in a positive NPV and saving of building material costs to the contractor.
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    Net incremental indirect external benefit of manufacturing recycled aggregate concrete
    Wijayasundara, M ; Mendis, P ; Crawford, RH (Elsevier, 2018-08-01)
    Concrete waste (CW) either reaches landfill with mixed waste or crushed to produce crushed concrete (CC) used as a road-base product in Australia. The coarse portion of CC, referred to as recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) has the potential to be used as an aggregate in structural concrete replacing natural aggregate (NA). The environmental performance of RAC has been studied in comparison to NAC, in terms of direct environmental implications (DEI) concerning the processes in the production chain of these products. However, when replacement at industry level is considered, the implications go beyond the DEI, and affect a series of other products/processes within a system boundary, referred to as indirect environmental implications (IEI). This paper quantifies the key IEI associated with the use of RCA in structural concrete and evaluates the external costs and benefits associated with it using economic evaluation methods. The net benefit associated with the avoidance of landfill of CW, extraction of NA, and transportation of waste and by-products are the major externalities identified and quantified in this paper. Evaluation of these suggest that there is a significant net benefit ranging from 9% to 28% of the price of natural aggregate concrete (NAC) with the production of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC), for RCA replacement rates between 30% and 100%.
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    Publishing human resource management research in different kinds of journals
    Harley, B ; Clark, T ; Wright, M ; Ketchen, DJ (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016-01-01)
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    Is leader-member exchange (LMX) differentiation beneficial or detrimental for group effectiveness? A meta-analytic investigation and theoretical integration
    Yu, A ; Matta, FK ; Cornfield, B (Academy of Management, 2018-06-01)
    Despite the burgeoning number of studies that have examined leader-member exchange (LMX) differentiation, definitive conclusions regarding its effects remain scarce. We propose a theoretical framework for studying LMX differentiation through an equity-equality perspective derived from allocation preferences theory, allowing us to elucidate both the beneficial and detrimental influences LMX differentiation can have on workgroups. In a meta-analytic investigation including 4,114 workgroups and 21,745 individuals, we found that LMX differentiation was detrimental to collective harmony and solidarity, as indicated by a consistent negative relationship with emergent states and group processes. A theoretical integration of our predictions within an input-mediator-outcome model of group effectiveness revealed a more complex pattern of relationships with group performance. By simultaneously considering the proximal and distal nature of group outcomes, we found that emergent states and group processes not only mediated the negative indirect relationship, but also suppressed the positive direct relationship between LMX differentiation and group performance. These findings demonstrate the utility of an equity-equality framework for understanding LMX differentiation in workgroups and imply that there are tradeoffs associated with differentiation that must be considered when predicting group effectiveness criteria.
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    When does virtuality help or hinder teams? Core team characteristics as contingency factors
    Schaubroeck, JM ; Yu, A (Elsevier, 2017-12-01)
    In this paper, we seek to encourage scholars to consider how reliance on technology-mediated communications can bring both promises and perils to team-based work structures. Specifically, we argue that a team's core characteristics (including skill differentiation, temporal stability, and authority differentiation) will differentially affect the challenges and opportunities presented by the team's reliance on virtual means of communication. First, we will discuss how varying degrees of each core characteristic can affect outcomes when teams rely on virtual communication. We then propose how configurations of the three characteristics and virtuality can enhance understanding in both research and practice. We advance propositions that we hope will serve as a starting point for scholarly discussion about how the literature on virtual teams can leverage the existing theories and knowledge on team structure and interdependencies.
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    How Does It Feel to Be Treated Like an Object? Direct and Indirect Effects of Exposure to Sexual Objectification on Women's Emotions in Daily Life
    Koval, P ; Holland, E ; Zyphur, MJ ; Stratemeyer, M ; Knight, JM ; Bailen, NH ; Thompson, RJ ; Roberts, T-A ; Haslam, N (American Psychological Association, 2019-06-01)
    Exposure to sexual objectification is an everyday experience for many women, yet little is known about its emotional consequences. Fredrickson and Roberts' (1997) objectification theory proposed a within-person process, wherein exposure to sexual objectification causes women to adopt a third-person perspective on their bodies, labeled self-objectification, which has harmful downstream consequences for their emotional well-being. However, previous studies have only tested this model at the between-person level, making them unreliable sources of inference about the proposed intraindividual psychological consequences of objectification. Here, we report the results of Bayesian multilevel structural equation models that simultaneously tested Fredrickson and Roberts' (1997) predictions both within and between persons, using data from 3 ecological momentary assessment (EMA) studies of women's (N = 268) experiences of sexual objectification in daily life. Our findings support the predicted within-person indirect effect of exposure to sexual objectification on increases in negative and self-conscious emotions via self-objectification. However, lagged analyses suggest that the within-person indirect emotional consequences of exposure to sexual objectification may be relatively fleeting. Our findings advance research on sexual objectification by providing the first comprehensive test of the within-person process proposed by Fredrickson and Roberts' (1997) objectification theory.
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    How do emerging multinationals configure political connections across institutional contexts?
    Chen, L ; Li, Y ; Fan, D (WILEY, 2018-08-01)
    Research Summary Forming informal ties with political agents is viewed as a viable strategy for multinational enterprises seeking to enter emerging countries. Less is known about the conditions under which political connection is most helpful for firms dealing with cross‐border institutional distance. We discuss the distinctive mechanisms through which emerging multinationals may benefit from both home and host political connections. Based on the strategy tripod perspective, we postulate that the importance of different types of connections depends on the overall configurations of a firm’s resources and industry characteristics, and these may change with institutional distance. Our analysis of a sample of Chinese high‐tech manufacturing firms yields new insights into political connections, institutional distance, and the strategy tripod perspective. Managerial Summary Political connections play an important role in firms’ international expansion. In this study, we consider the importance of home political connections and host political connections in overcoming institutional barriers to foreign entry. We show that this importance varies, depending on firms’ resource bases and industry dynamics, and it may switch from a useful asset to a dispensable one under certain circumstances. We reach our conclusion from an analysis of Chinese high‐tech manufacturing firms’ foreign direct investment.