Management and Marketing - Research Publications

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    The Effects of Age and Drug Dependency on the Emotional Exhaustion and Job Satisfaction of Adult Streetworkers in Australia
    Cregan, C ; Kulik, CT ; Salinger, D (SPRINGER/PLENUM PUBLISHERS, 2013-07-01)
    This multi-method study investigated a sample of adult streetworkers (n = 107) in Melbourne, Australia in 2008. We contacted outdoor prostitutes through four "drop-in" centers run by not-for-profit organizations. Drug use was the over-riding common characteristic of most of these streetworkers. Using emotional labor theory as a theoretical framework, we hypothesized that individuals who worked on the streets solely to earn money to buy drugs would experience the highest levels of emotional exhaustion and the lowest levels of job satisfaction. We predicted these effects would be most evident for older drug dependent streetworkers. Content analysis of open-ended interview responses identified acting, age, and drug dependency as key themes. Moderator hierarchical regression analysis of responses to closed-ended questions with tests for mediation supported the hypotheses. It also demonstrated that older drug dependent streetworkers felt most trapped in their occupation and this sense of being locked-in was associated with emotional exhaustion but not with job satisfaction. The evidence that age and drug dependency affects the psychological outcomes associated with streetwork suggests that the efforts of police and the courts will be ineffective in dealing with people whose addiction traps them in an occupation that offers few intrinsic rewards. Decriminalization would encourage police to protect streetworkers from violence. Agencies could seek financial support to provide welfare and exit strategies.
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    Short-term and long-term stability in electronic communication networks
    Quintane, E ; Pattison, PE ; Robins, GL ; Mol, JM (Academy of Management, 2013-01-01)
    Network researchers typically focus on patterns of stable relationships, where stability represents the unfolding of social processes over long time frames. By contrast, we argue and empirically demonstrate that social interactions exhibit regularities across different time frames (short and long-term), reflecting distinct social processes.
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    The development of post-project buyer-seller interaction in service-intensive projects
    Ojansivu, I ; Alajoutsijärvi, K ; Salo, J (Elsevier BV, 2013-11-01)
    The purpose of this research is to enhance the understanding of post-project buyer-seller interaction, a topic previously studied mainly from the perspective of social exchange or sleeping relationships. With the advent of service-intensive projects, however, the dynamics of post-project interaction has changed, demanding a broader theorization. This research extends the scope of project marketing, by proposing a research framework illustrating interaction development in a longitudinal setting. We utilize the framework to analyze three projects, two of which continued for more than a decade, through a qualitative case study. The research provides empirical insight into the interaction orientations and development patterns arising in the post-project stage. It suggests that post-project interaction develops through three main orientations (cooperative development, buyer-led development, and seller-led maintenance) that vary over time, thus creating unique development patterns. The study concludes with five practical recommendations for managers to deal with evolving post-project interaction.
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    Organizational and Epistemic Change: The Growth of the Art Investment Industry
    Coslor, EH ; Spaenjers, C (Academy of Management, 2013-01)
    This case shows how an emergent knowledge community is necessary to support and legitimate the efforts of entrepreneurs in new areas of financial investment, due to strong, institutionalized expectations about the rational evaluation and monitoring of financial assets. Using the concept of epistemic cultures to complement an organizational field narrative, this paper examines the development of artwork as a recognizable financial investment category. Despite a long history of attention to art investment, the legitimacy of art as an asset is still emerging. Legitimacy questions have decreased since the 1960s due to the growth of an epistemic culture around art investing, facilitated by new market actors who met the need of professional investors for transparency and accountability. Technical knowledge about art investments came from economists, art price service providers, art market analysts, and others. We also see the development of a more practical knowledge about how best to structure the investment and to profit from art investment. The growth of knowledge – through a series of experiments and failures – around the properties and optimal structure of art investments was just as important for the emergence of the industry as having investors who were willing to enter the new area.
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    Work and Wages at a Melbourne Factory, the Guest Biscuit Works 1870-1921
    Fahey, C ; Sammartino, A (Wiley, 2013)
    The story of wages in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Australia has largely been told through official published statistics and the experiences of skilled artisans and construction labourers. Utilising wage book data from an early successful manufacturing plant - a biscuit factory - we reveal the earning histories of several neglected groups of Australian workers. We specifically investigate the effects of the 1890s depression, the introduction of a wages board, and shifting demographics on the wages of unskilled factory hands, women, juvenile workers, and commercial clerks. We demonstrate that typical Australian wage series studies have misinterpreted the impact of these phenomena.
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    Dissecting home regionalisation: how large does the region loom?
    Sammartino, A ; Osegowitsch, T (Emerald, 2013)
    Purpose: The paper aims to motivate more rigorous theoretical and empirical specification of the home regionalization phenomenon, in particular the dynamics of shifting advantage over time within a multinational enterprise. It aims to improve dialogue among regionalization researchers. Design/methodology/approach: Contrasting the economizing and behavioral perspectives on internationalization, the paper presents five different archetypes of the home‐regionalization phenomenon. These archetypes are predicated on strategic management stylizations of competitive advantage. Findings: The paper demonstrates that the notion of home regionalization as a dominant and superior model for firm internationalization remains a promising yet under‐explained and inconsistently articulated thesis. By introducing and exploring the archetypes, it shows the diversity of home‐regionalization theses, and the prospect that multiple forms of regionalization may be at play for different firms, industries and locations. Originality/value: The paper presents the full complement of archetypes of the home‐regionalization phenomenon and explores their corresponding assumptions. These explorations open up new empirical and theoretical research avenues for distinguishing any genuine region effects.
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    Strategic sourcing in the UK bioenergy industry
    Scott, JA ; Ho, W ; Dey, PK (ELSEVIER, 2013-12-01)
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    Multi-level genetic algorithm for the resource-constrained re-entrant scheduling problem in the flow shop
    Lin, D ; Lee, CKM ; Ho, W (Elsevier BV, 2013)
    The re-entrant flow shop scheduling problem (RFSP) is regarded as a NP-hard problem and attracted the attention of both researchers and industry. Current approach attempts to minimize the makespan of RFSP without considering the interdependency between the resource constraints and the re-entrant probability. This paper proposed Multi-level genetic algorithm (GA) by including the co-related re-entrant possibility and production mode in multi-level chromosome encoding. Repair operator is incorporated in the Multi-level genetic algorithm so as to revise the infeasible solution by resolving the resource conflict. With the objective of minimizing the makespan, Multi-level genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed and ANOVA is used to fine tune the parameter setting of GA. The experiment shows that the proposed approach is more effective to find the near-optimal schedule than the simulated annealing algorithm for both small-size problem and large-size problem.
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    Organizing Processes and the Construction of Risk: A Discursive Approach
    Maguire, S ; Hardy, C (Academy of Management, 2013)
    This study examines the organizing processes through which products “become” risky. Drawing on a case study of chemical risk assessment and management processes in Canada and comparing two chemicals, it identifies a series of enacted practices that bundle into two forms of social ordering: “normalizing” and “problematizing.” By bringing the past to bear differently on organizing processes, these two forms of social ordering structure the discursive work of actors in both their attempts to stabilize and their attempts to destabilize and change meanings of risk objects. As a result, objects “become” risky or safe in different ways.