Management and Marketing - Research Publications

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    The Fear of COVID-19 Scale: Its Structure and Measurement Invariance Across 48 Countries
    Sawicki, AJ ; Zemojtel-Piotrowska, M ; Balcerowska, JM ; Sawicka, MJ ; Piotrowski, J ; Sedikides, C ; Jonason, PK ; Maltby, J ; Adamovic, M ; Agada, AMD ; Ahmed, O ; Al-Shawaf, L ; Appiah, SCY ; Ardi, R ; Babakr, ZH ; Baltatescu, S ; Bonato, M ; Cowden, RG ; Chobthamkit, P ; De Pretto, L ; Gouveia, VV ; Haretche, C ; Ilisko, D ; Aruta, JJB ; Jia, F ; Jovanovic, V ; Jukic, T ; Kamble, S ; Khachatryan, N ; Klicperova-Baker, M ; Koralov, M ; Kovacs, M ; Kretchner, M ; Fernandez, AL ; Liik, K ; Malik, NI ; Malysheva, K ; Moon, C ; Muehlbacher, S ; Nartova-Bochaver, S ; Torres-Marin, J ; Ozsoy, E ; Park, J ; Piccinelli, E ; Ramos-Diaz, J ; Ridic, O ; Samekin, A ; Starc, A ; Kieu, TTT ; Tomsik, R ; Umeh, CS ; Wills-Herrera, E ; Wlodarczyk, A ; Vally, Z ; Zand, S (AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC, 2022-01-20)
    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been a source of fear around the world. We asked whether the measurement of this fear is trustworthy and comparable across countries. In particular, we explored the measurement invariance and cross-cultural replicability of the widely used Fear of COVID-19 scale (FCV-19S), testing community samples from 48 countries (N = 14,558). The findings indicate that the FCV-19S has a somewhat problematic structure, yet the one-factor solution is replicable across cultural contexts and could be used in studies that compare people who vary on gender and educational level. The validity of the scale is supported by a consistent pattern of positive correlations with perceived stress and general anxiety. However, given the unclear structure of the FCV-19S, we recommend using latent factor scores, instead of raw scores, especially in cross-cultural comparisons. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).
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    Explaining the relationship between ethnicity and depressive symptoms: The roles of climate for inclusion, job self-efficacy, and job demands
    Adamovic, M ; Sojo, V ; Schachtman, R ; Vargas, A (SPRINGER, 2022-06-13)
    Abstract Prior research indicates that employees from ethnic minority backgrounds are more likely to experience depression and other mental health problems than their ethnic majority counterparts. To understand what drives these negative outcomes, we integrate research on ethnic minorities at work with the job demands-resources (JDR) model. Based on the JDR model, we consider climate for inclusion as a key job resource for ethnic minority employees that mitigates the deleterious effects of ethnic minority status on job self-efficacy, perceived job demands, and depressive symptoms. We conducted a two-wave survey study (Time 1: N = 771; Time 2: N = 299, six months apart) with employees from five medium sized not-for-profit and local government organizations in Australia. Our empirical results indicate that ethnic minorities report a higher job-self-efficacy and fewer depressive symptoms when they perceive a high climate for inclusion.
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    A Model of Leadership Transitions in Teams
    Marques-Quinteiro, P ; van Dijk, H ; Peterson, DR ; Adamovic, M ; Buengeler, C ; Santos, CM (SAGE Publications, 2022-04-01)
    Teams with shared leadership arrangements are ubiquitous in twenty-first century organizations. Although transitions in leadership are a common and key feature of such teams, there is little insight into how and when leadership arrangements transition over time. Bridging the shared leadership and team adaptation literatures, we present a model of Leadership Transitions in Teams to describe the adaptive process through which teams intentionally modify the existing leadership arrangement. The basic assumption underlying this model is that leadership transitions occur when there is a mismatch between the team’s needs and its current leadership arrangement. Such a mismatch results from an anticipated or observed change. If it is anticipated, team members can democratically discuss and try out a new leadership arrangement, preventing mismatch and thus lowered team effectiveness. In contrast, if the mismatch has already occurred, teams are more likely to adopt a less democratic process—either a coalition-based or intervening-based process—to change the leadership arrangement in their team to counteract faltering team effectiveness. We propose that the ways in which leadership transition episodes can unfold and relate to team effectiveness will depend on the type (determined by the timing of the leadership transition episode in relation to the change), approach (determined by the extent to which there is consensus on if and how to change the leadership transition episode), and boundary conditions of leadership transition episodes. We advance an agenda for research on leadership transitions in teams and outline practical implications for teams with shared leadership structures.
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    Societal emotional environments and cross-cultural differences in life satisfaction: A forty-nine country study
    Krys, K ; Yeung, JC ; Capaldi, CA ; Lun, VMC ; Torres, C ; van Tilburg, WAP ; Bond, MH ; Zelenski, JM ; Haas, BW ; Park, J ; Maricchiolo, F ; Vauclair, CM ; Kosiarczyk, A ; Kocimska-Zych, A ; Kwiatkowska, A ; Adamovic, M ; Pavlopoulos, V ; Fülöp, M ; Sirlopu, D ; Okvitawanli, A ; Boer, D ; Teyssier, J ; Malyonova, A ; Gavreliuc, A ; Uchida, Y ; Serdarevich, U ; Akotia, C ; Appoh, L ; Arévalo Mira, DM ; Baltin, A ; Denoux, P ; Dominguez-Espinosa, A ; Esteves, CS ; Gamsakhurdia, V ; Garðarsdóttir, RB ; Igbokwe, DO ; Igou, ER ; Işık, İ ; Kascakova, N ; Klůzová Kračmárová, L ; Kronberger, N ; Lee, JH ; Liu, X ; Barrientos, PE ; Mohorić, T ; Mustaffa, NF ; Mosca, O ; Nader, M ; Nadi, A ; van Osch, Y ; Pavlović, Z ; Poláčková Šolcová, I ; Rizwan, M ; Romashov, V ; Røysamb, E ; Sargautyte, R ; Schwarz, B ; Selecká, L ; Selim, HA ; Stogianni, M ; Sun, CR ; Xing, C ; Vignoles, VL (Informa UK Limited, 2022-01-01)
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    Exploring the impacts of the COVID-19 crisis for the employment prospects of refugees and people seeking asylum in Australia
    Cooney-O'Donoghue, D ; Adamovic, M ; Sojo, V (WILEY, 2021-08-31)
    As recent research indicates, refugees and people seeking asylum are suffering disproportionately from the COVID-19 pandemic and have become more and more "shut out" and marginalised. An important pathway to integration and self-reliance is sustainable employment. To explore the impacts of COVID-19 on the employment prospects of refugees and people seeking asylum, we conducted 35 interviews with managers from Australian organisations that employ or assist refugees and asylum seekers in finding employment and 20 interviews with refugees and people seeking asylum. Our interviews indicate that the labour market has become more difficult for these groups in the COVID-19 era due to (1) declines in job availabilities, (2) loss of jobs, (3) increased competition in the labour market and (4) increased discrimination and an "Australian first" mentality. Our interviews further suggest four strategies to improve employment prospects in the current situation: (1) pathways to permanent residency and citizenship for people seeking asylum; (2) access to healthcare and a financial safety net; (3) online training and education; and (4) social procurement.
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    Personal Life Satisfaction as a Measure of Societal Happiness is an Individualistic Presumption: Evidence from Fifty Countries
    Krys, K ; Park, J ; Kocimska-Zych, A ; Kosiarczyk, A ; Selim, HA ; Wojtczuk-Turek, A ; Haas, BW ; Uchida, Y ; Torres, C ; Capaldi, CA ; Bond, MH ; Zelenski, JM ; Lun, VMC ; Maricchiolo, F ; Vauclair, CM ; Poláčková Šolcová, I ; Sirlopú, D ; Xing, C ; Vignoles, VL ; van Tilburg, WAP ; Teyssier, J ; Sun, CR ; Stoyanova, S ; Serdarevich, U ; Schwarz, B ; Sargautyte, R ; Røysamb, E ; Romashov, V ; Rizwan, M ; Pavlović, Z ; Pavlopoulos, V ; van Osch, Y ; Okvitawanli, A ; Nadi, A ; Nader, M ; Nur Fariza, M ; Mosca, O ; Mohorić, T ; Barrientos, PE ; Malyonova, A ; Liu, X ; Lee, JH ; Kwiatkowska, A ; Kronberger, N ; Klůzová Kračmárová, L ; Kascakova, N ; Işık, İ ; Igou, ER ; Igbokwe, DO ; Hanke-Boer, D ; Gavreliuc, A ; Garðarsdóttir, RB ; Fülöp, M ; Gamsakhurdia, V ; Esteves, CS ; Domínguez-Espinosa, A ; Denoux, P ; Charkviani, S ; Baltin, A ; Mira, ADM ; Appoh, L ; Albert, I ; Akotia, CS ; Adamovic, M (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-06-01)
    Abstract Numerous studies document that societal happiness is correlated with individualism, but the nature of this phenomenon remains understudied. In the current paper, we address this gap and test the reasoning that individualism correlates with societal happiness because the most common measure of societal happiness (i.e., country-level aggregates of personal life satisfaction) is individualism-themed. With the data collected from 13,009 participants across fifty countries, we compare associations of four types of happiness (out of which three are more collectivism-themed than personal life satisfaction) with two different measures of individualism. We replicated previous findings by demonstrating that societal happiness measured as country-level aggregate of personal life satisfaction is correlated with individualism. Importantly though, we also found that the country-level aggregates of the collectivism-themed measures of happiness do not tend to be significantly correlated with individualism. Implications for happiness studies and for policy makers are signaled.
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    Structure of Dark Triad Dirty Dozen Across Eight World Regions
    Rogoza, R ; Żemojtel-Piotrowska, M ; Jonason, PK ; Piotrowski, J ; Campbell, KW ; Gebauer, JE ; Maltby, J ; Sedikides, C ; Adamovic, M ; Adams, BG ; Ang, RP ; Ardi, R ; Atitsogbe, KA ; Baltatescu, S ; Bilić, S ; Bodroža, B ; Gruneau Brulin, J ; Bundhoo Poonoosamy, HY ; Chaleeraktrakoon, T ; Del Carmen Dominguez, A ; Dragova-Koleva, S ; El-Astal, S ; Eldesoki, WLM ; Gouveia, VV ; Gundolf, K ; Ilisko, D ; Jukić, T ; Kamble, SV ; Khachatryan, N ; Klicperova-Baker, M ; Kovacs, M ; Kozytska, I ; Larzabal Fernandez, A ; Lehmann, K ; Lei, X ; Liik, K ; McCain, J ; Milfont, TL ; Nehrlich, A ; Osin, E ; Özsoy, E ; Park, J ; Ramos-Diaz, J ; Riđić, O ; Qadir, A ; Samekin, A ; Tiliouine, H ; Tomsik, R ; Umeh, CS ; van den Bos, K ; Van Hiel, A ; Vauclair, CM ; Włodarczyk, A (SAGE Publications, 2021-06-01)
    The Dark Triad (i.e., narcissism, psychopathy, Machiavellianism) has garnered intense attention over the past 15 years. We examined the structure of these traits’ measure—the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen (DTDD)—in a sample of 11,488 participants from three W.E.I.R.D. (i.e., North America, Oceania, Western Europe) and five non-W.E.I.R.D. (i.e., Asia, Middle East, non-Western Europe, South America, sub-Saharan Africa) world regions. The results confirmed the measurement invariance of the DTDD across participants’ sex in all world regions, with men scoring higher than women on all traits (except for psychopathy in Asia, where the difference was not significant). We found evidence for metric (and partial scalar) measurement invariance within and between W.E.I.R.D. and non-W.E.I.R.D. world regions. The results generally support the structure of the DTDD.
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    Between fit and flexibility? The benefits of high-performance work practices and leadership capability for innovation outcomes
    Gahan, P ; Theilacker, M ; Adamovic, M ; Choi, D ; Harley, B ; Healy, J ; Olsen, JE (Wiley, 2021-04-01)
    The idea that human resource management (HRM) plays a strategic role in generating sustainable competitive advantage for organisations or intermediate outcomes such as innovation is a central tenet in HRM theory and research. Yet, the explanation for this relationship remains unclear. We contribute to understanding how HRM plays a role by integrating insights drawn from HRM and strategic management. We explore how configurations of high‐performance work systems (HPWS) and leadership competence (LC) provide micro‐foundations for organisational capabilities associated with innovation. We also examine the moderating role of external environmental conditions. We find support for the proposition that HPWS and LC contribute to capabilities associated with innovation. Importantly, in stable environments, the formation of the capabilities required for innovation is more strongly associated with HPWS, whereas in more dynamic environments, LC plays a more pronounced role. These findings have implications for understanding the strategic role HRM plays and for management practice.
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    Analyzing discrimination in recruitment: A guide and best practices for resume studies
    Adamovic, M (Wiley, 2020-12-01)
    Resume studies are natural field experiments in which researchers standardize the content of resumes and vary them by individual characteristics. Researchers submit the resumes to job advertisements and compare the employers' responses toward the different resumes to measure labor market discrimination. Despite the robustness of this method, its use has not been fully exploited in human resource management and organizational psychology research. Based on a literature review, we provide an overview of the best practices for resume studies and a step‐by‐step plan to guide researchers. We also explain challenges in the design and implementation of these studies and how they can be addressed. Finally, we suggest avenues for future research and how future studies can contribute to reduce hiring discrimination.
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    Bringing the Leader Back in: Why, How, and When Leadership Empowerment Behavior Shapes Coworker Conflict
    Adamovic, M ; Gahan, P ; Olsen, JE ; Harley, B ; Healy, J ; Theilacker, M (SAGE Publications, 2020)
    With the diffusion of team-based work organizations and flatter organizational hierarchies, many leaders empower employees to perform their work. Empowerment creates an interesting tension regarding coworker conflict, enhancing trust and giving employees more autonomy to prevent conflict, while also increasing workload and the potential for coworker conflict. Recent conflict research has focused on how characteristics of individuals, groups, and tasks contribute to conflict among coworkers. We extend this work by exploring the role of leader empowerment behavior (LEB) in influencing coworker conflict. Our model integrates research on LEB and coworker conflict to help organizations manage coworker conflict effectively. To test our model at the workplace level, we utilize data drawn from matched surveys of leaders and employees in 317 workplaces. We find that LEB relates negatively to relationship and task conflict through affective and cognitive trust in leaders. We further find that LEB relates negatively to relationship and task conflict through reduced workload, but only when employees have a clear role description. In contrast, if employees have unclear roles, LEB has a U-curve relationship with workload: a moderate level of LEB reduces workload, but a high level of LEB increases workload, in turn increasing coworker conflict. Finally, relationship conflict has a direct negative effect on task performance, whereas task conflict has an indirect negative effect through relationship conflict.