Management and Marketing - Research Publications

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    COVID-19 is an opportunity to rethink I-O psychology, not for business as usual
    Bapuji, H ; Patel, C ; Ertug, G ; Allen, DG (CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2021-06-01)
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    Challenges and Insights from South Asia for Imagining Ethical Organizations: Introduction to the Special Issue
    Alamgir, F ; Bapuji, H ; Mir, R (SPRINGER, 2022-03-28)
    Abstract South Asia is a region that two billion world citizens call home. It connotes not only a geographical place but a discursive space that, despite its heterogeneities of ethnicity and political experience, is joined at the hip by a shared experience of colonialism, sovereignty, and globalized neoliberalism. As a result, South Asia is also a site of aspiration and struggle, as well as emancipation and exploitation. Research in business ethics has not adequately addressed the challenges faced by this region, and consequently overlooked the possibility that a fine-grained analysis of the organizational issues faced by this region can generate new insights on ethical organizations across the world. This special issue marks an important step in that direction and reveals potentially translocal insights about how ethical organizations can be reimagined.
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    A cross-disciplinary review of product recall research: A stakeholder-stage framework
    Li, H ; Bapuji, H ; Talluri, S ; Singh, P (Elsevier, 2022)
    Research on product recalls has recently witnessed a sharp increase; however, this stream of research is dispersed within and outside the discipline of management. In the current article, we review this research stream by adopting a stakeholder-stage framework that draws on stakeholder theory and crisis management literature. Specifically, we summarize and integrate the product recall research along two dimensions: the stakeholders involved (e.g., managers, employees, shareholders, consumers, suppliers, competitors, media, and regulators) and the key issues at different stages of a recall (before-recall, during-recall, and after-recall). We find that current research has focused on managers, shareholders, and consumers, but has paid limited attention to other equally important stakeholders such as suppliers, employees, competitors, media, and regulators. Also, researchers have predominantly examined the issues associated with the after-recall stage to minimize the consequences of recalls, while the before- and during-recall stages that prevent recalls and make them more effective are relatively underexamined. To address these gaps and extend the current research, we develop a range of future research opportunities that can make nuanced theoretical contributions and generate implications for practice and policy. By emphasizing the need to adopt a stakeholder management approach and consider recalls as a process, rather than an event, this review paves the way for enriching future research on product recalls.
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    "Educate, Agitate, Organize": Inequality and Ethics in the Writings of Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar
    Kumar, A ; Bapuji, H ; Mir, R (SPRINGER, 2021-02-25)
    Antibiotic residues in milk affects economics of dairy industry and poses health risks to consumers. This study aimed to assess health risks associated with presence of antibiotics in 173 raw and pasteurized milk sampled from northwestern Himalayan state of India. The oxytetracycline and amoxicillin were quantitatively analyzed using validated HPLC-DAD. Methods were selective and linear (R2 > 0.99) with decision limit and detection capability of 1.4 and 0.9 µg/kg and 2.5 and 1.5 µg/kg for oxytetracycline and amoxicillin, respectively. Recoveries ranged from 88-98% with relative standard deviation < 10%. Oxytetracycline and amoxicillin were detected in 8.1% and 1.2% samples, with 1.7% and 1.2% samples exceeding the tolerance limits, respectively. Health risk assessment revealed that estimated daily intakes of antibiotics through milk were lower than acceptable daily intakes (ADI). However, children might receive 9-21% of determined ADI through milk consumption only. Therefore, continuous, sub-therapeutic and long term exposures of antibiotics can pose health risk to consumers. Hence, current findings elucidate the need for vigilant monitoring of antibiotics accompanied by educational programs to farmers for adopting good husbandry practices and adherence to withdrawal periods to meet the expectations of food safety and safeguarding human health. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The online version of this article contains supplementary material available at (10.1007/s13197-021-04988-8).
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    Field Experiments in Routine Dynamics
    Bapuji, H ; Hora, M ; Li, H ; D’Adderio, L ; Dittrich, K ; Feldman, M ; Pentland, B ; Rerup, C ; Seidl, D (Cambridge University Press, 2021)
    Experimental approaches are gaining in popularity across disciplines, ranging from behavioral sciences to economics. In this chapter, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of field experiments and review their use by scholars to study routine dynamics. Based on these, we suggest that field experiments hold further promise to study routines given their potential to develop and test theory, while achieving internal and external validity. To further the adoption of field experiments to study routines, we outline a five-step procedure, including research questions and hypotheses, context and research setting, treatment and design, measurement and statistical tests, and managing field experiments. We conclude by discussing potential research questions and contexts suitable for field experiments.
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    As You Sow, So Shall You Reap: Organizations and Economic Inequality
    Mitra, A ; Bapuji, H ; Ertug, G ; Shaw, J (WorldatWork, 2020)
    The 2019 report by the U.S. Census Bureau noted that income inequality in the United States reached its highest level since the Census Bureau started tracking it in 1967 (Semega et al. 2019). Income inequality, reasured as the Gini Index, was 0.397 in 1967 but climbed to 0.485 in 2018 (Semega et al. 2019). What might be disappointing to most U.S. workers is the fact that despite very low unemployment rates, the real median household income has not changed significantly over the past decade. The bottom line is that wealth gains go predominantly to those already at the top. The rising gap between rich and poor is a growing global concern on par with such issues as discrimination, social justice and climate change. Although economic inequality penetrated collective social conscience after the Occupy Wall Street protests in 2011, action came at a slower pace. But, several candidates for Democratic nomination in the 2020 U.S. presidential election include growing income inequality as a significant national issue in their platforms. Similarly, business leaders have begun to take steps to deal with related issues, such as the gender pay gap. In one of the most visible actions related to this issue, Melinda Gates has committed $1 billion to promote gender equality (Gates 2019).
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    COVID-19 and the Workplace: Implications, Issues, and Insights for Future Research and Action
    Kniffin, K ; Narayanan, J ; Anseel, F ; Antonakis, J ; Ashford, SJ ; Bakker, AB ; Bamberger, P ; Bapuji, H ; Bhave, DP ; Choi, V ; Creary, S ; Demerouti, E ; Flynn, F ; Gelfand, M ; Greer, L ; Johns, G ; Kesebir, S ; Klein, PG ; Lee, S ; Ozcelik, H ; Petriglieri, JL ; Rothbard, N ; Rudolph, C ; Shaw, JD ; Sirola, N ; Wanberg, C ; Whillans, A ; Wilmot, M ; van vugt, M (American Psychological Association, 2021)
    The impacts of COVID-19 on workers and workplaces across the globe have been dramatic. This broad review of prior research rooted in work and organizational psychology, and related fields, is intended to make sense of the implications for employees, teams, and work organizations.This review and preview of relevant literatures focuses on: (i) emergent changes in work practices (e.g., working from home, virtual teamwork) and (ii) emergent changes for workers (e.g, social distancing, stress, and unemployment). In addition, potentialmoderating factors (demographic characteristics, individual differences, and organizational norms) are examined given the likelihood that COVID-19 will generate disparate effects. This broad-scope overview provides an integrative approach for considering the implications of COVID-19 for work, workers, and organizations while also identifying issues for future research and insights to inform solutions.
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    Caste and Organization Studies: Our Silence Makes Us Complicit
    Chrispal, S ; Bapuji, H ; Zietsma, C (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2020-10-04)
    The caste system has received scant attention in organization studies, despite persisting over thousands of years, influencing the socioeconomic lives of over a billion people around the world and subjecting over 300 million people to severe socioeconomic discrimination. By overlooking caste, scholars risk conforming subaltern empirics to imperialist knowledge and miss the nuance and complexity that caste can bring to organization studies. We argue that the caste system is an institution that affects the workplace, yet it is difficult to dismantle because of its rooting in bodies and the sacred, which strips away agency. As an institution that is deeply embodied, caste has implications for institutional work, precarious work and modern slavery. We conclude with a call for scholarly engagement with caste to study its implications in the pursuit of grand challenges and inclusive organizations.
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    Tweeting the Marginalized Voices: A Netnographic Account
    Chrispal, S ; Bapuji, H ; Mir, R ; Fayard, A-L (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2020-07-26)
    Netnographic research allows researchers to study the cultures and behaviour of online communities through a multitude of ways. Still in its nascency, this method allows scholars to mould its techniques to suit the study of a particular online culture and community. Moreover, it opens pathways to study marginalized and oppressed communities that are often difficult to access or navigate in the real world. In our research, we focused on the Dalits, who are at the bottom of the caste system and studied the way they use Twitter to present their perspectives and bring awareness to their experiences. Through this chapter, we present netnography as a viable research method and illustrate it with our experience.
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    Corona crisis and inequality: Why management research needs a societal turn
    Bapuji, H ; Patel, C ; Ertug, G ; Allen, DG (SAGE Publications, 2020-09-01)
    As the world struggles to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, the stark inequalities in our societies have been laid bare, and the interplay between organizations and societies has also become evident yet again. This crisis underscores the need for management scholars to take a societal turn and examine how organizational practices interact with societal economic inequality. To illustrate this approach, we discuss organizational practices – corporate social responsibility, work design, recruitment and selection, and compensation management – that can contribute to the normalization, reinforcement, and reduction of economic inequalities in society. We conclude by calling on scholars of inequality, as well as of broader management research, to take a societal turn to enhance the relevance and impact of management research.