Management and Marketing - Research Publications

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    Explaining the relationship between ethnicity and depressive symptoms: The roles of climate for inclusion, job self-efficacy, and job demands
    Adamovic, M ; Sojo, V ; Schachtman, R ; Vargas, A (SPRINGER, 2022-06-13)
    Abstract Prior research indicates that employees from ethnic minority backgrounds are more likely to experience depression and other mental health problems than their ethnic majority counterparts. To understand what drives these negative outcomes, we integrate research on ethnic minorities at work with the job demands-resources (JDR) model. Based on the JDR model, we consider climate for inclusion as a key job resource for ethnic minority employees that mitigates the deleterious effects of ethnic minority status on job self-efficacy, perceived job demands, and depressive symptoms. We conducted a two-wave survey study (Time 1: N = 771; Time 2: N = 299, six months apart) with employees from five medium sized not-for-profit and local government organizations in Australia. Our empirical results indicate that ethnic minorities report a higher job-self-efficacy and fewer depressive symptoms when they perceive a high climate for inclusion.
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    What works, what’s fair? Using systematic reviews to build the evidence base on strategies to increase gender equality in the public sector
    Sojo Monzon, V ; Ryan, M ; Fine, C ; Wheeler, M ; McGrath, M ; Roberts, V ; Arthur-Hulme, L ; Hadoux, R ; Western, K ; Sojo Monzon, V ( 2022-05-24)
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    Happier workers, healthier patients: An analysis of healthcare worker engagement and health service outcomes in Victoria
    Bell, S ; Garud, N ; Pati, R ; Sojo Monzon, V ; Healy, J ; Adamovic, M (Safer Care Victoria, Victorian Managed Insurance Authority., 2022-01-21)
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    Exploring the impacts of the COVID-19 crisis for the employment prospects of refugees and people seeking asylum in Australia
    Cooney-O'Donoghue, D ; Adamovic, M ; Sojo, V (WILEY, 2021-08-31)
    As recent research indicates, refugees and people seeking asylum are suffering disproportionately from the COVID-19 pandemic and have become more and more "shut out" and marginalised. An important pathway to integration and self-reliance is sustainable employment. To explore the impacts of COVID-19 on the employment prospects of refugees and people seeking asylum, we conducted 35 interviews with managers from Australian organisations that employ or assist refugees and asylum seekers in finding employment and 20 interviews with refugees and people seeking asylum. Our interviews indicate that the labour market has become more difficult for these groups in the COVID-19 era due to (1) declines in job availabilities, (2) loss of jobs, (3) increased competition in the labour market and (4) increased discrimination and an "Australian first" mentality. Our interviews further suggest four strategies to improve employment prospects in the current situation: (1) pathways to permanent residency and citizenship for people seeking asylum; (2) access to healthcare and a financial safety net; (3) online training and education; and (4) social procurement.
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    Employment Precarity Strengthens the Relationships Between the Dark Triad and Professional Commitment
    Kaufmann, LM ; Wheeler, MA ; Sojo, VE (Frontiers Media SA, 2021)
    The Dark Triad traits of Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy have been found to negatively impact work behaviors including information sharing, reporting of unethical conduct, and mistreatment of colleagues and subordinates. However, research has found the Dark Triad can also be related to forms of organizational commitment which underpin positive work behaviors, including engaging in tasks and duties beyond those required (i.e., “going above and beyond”). Professional commitment is a broader form of commitment that has been found to be significantly related to organizational commitment, sharing antecedents, and having similar outcomes. Professional commitment, the affective, normative, and continuance commitment toward one's profession or occupation, has the benefit of applying to individuals employed by organizations as well as those working for themselves or between jobs. In this research, we explore relationships between professional commitment, using previous research on the relationship between the dark triad traits of Machiavellianism, psychopathy, and narcissism and organizational commitment, as a basis for predictions. We also explored two forms of precarious employment (career interruptions and part-time or casual work) as possible moderators of the dark triad-professional commitment relationship. Participants were 184 Australian professionals (52.2% men), a slight majority of whom had experienced a career interruption (69.6%) or a year or more of part-time or casual employment (70.7%). The results showed that psychopathy had a negative association with affective commitment, whereas Machiavellianism was positively related to normative commitment, and narcissism was positively related to normative and continuance commitment. Using regression analysis, we found that among individuals who have worked in part-time/casual employment longer, Machiavellianism and psychopathy had significantly stronger negative associations with affective commitment. In contrast, among individuals who have had a significant career interruption, Machiavellianism had significantly stronger positive association with continuance commitment. These findings help expand our understanding of both the dark triad and its contingent impact on workers' attachment to their profession.
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    Why Does Workplace Gender Diversity Matter? Justice, Organizational Benefits, and Policy
    Fine, C ; Sojo Monzon, V ; Lawford-Smith, H (Wiley, 2020)
    Why does workplace gender diversity matter? Here, we provide a review of the literature on both justice‐based and organizational benefits of workplace gender diversity that, importantly, is informed by evidence regarding sex differences and their relationship with vocational behavior and outcomes. This review indicates that the sexes are neither distinctly different, nor so similar as to be fungible. Justice‐based gains of workplace gender diversity include that it may cause less sex discrimination and may combat androcentrism in products and services. We then consider potential instrumental benefits of workplace gender diversity to organizations, including for team and firm performance, innovation, occupational well‐being, and corporate governance. The evidence of positive association is currently strongest for occupational well‐being and governance. We recommend that policy makers ground gender diversity initiatives in this comprehensive and evidence‐based understanding of the benefits of workplace gender diversity.
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    The ‘good, bad and merit’ arguments in Australian news coverage of workplace gender diversity
    Sojo Monzon, V ; Fine, C ; Lawford-Smith, H ; Yang, Z ; Verspoor, C (The University of Melbourne and VicHealth, 2020-09-30)
    Research aims: In this study, we used the machine learning technique of topic modelling, as well as qualitative content analysis, on a large sample of articles published in high-circulation Australian printed media with the objectives to: 1. Explore the ways workplace gender diversity issues are discussed. 2. Identify the most common types of arguments for and against striving for greater workplace gender diversity. 3. Evaluate whether the year and month of publication, the type of diversity discussed and the sex of the author are related to the types of arguments for and against workplace gender diversity. Research contribution: Our findings indicate that the analysed articles were more likely to: • Focus on high-profile women (e.g., politicians, actors and influencers) and their life-styles, including trade-offs they had to make, rather than on discussions of the policies and practices organisations implement to manage workplace gender diversity, or on quantitative descriptions of the extent of gender inequality and lack of gender diversity. • Focus on discussions of sexism in the media industry and in particular high-profile workplace sexual harassment cases. • Present a narrow range of reasons for and against workplace gender diversity initiatives. • Focus on arguments in favour of increased workplace gender diversity when written by women (compared with men) and focus on risks to merit when written by men (compared with women).
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    More women in workplace leadership could make the difference post-Covid
    Sojo Monzon, V ; Ainsworth, S (KIng's College London, 2020-06-05)
    As we struggle to imagine what a post-Covid-19 world of work might look like, the disproportionate effects that the pandemic has had on women need to be made visible. We could be living through another era where the hard-fought rights and protections female workers currently enjoy are wound back and future efforts made more difficult.
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    Proceedings of Gender and Sexuality at Work: A Multidisciplinary Research and Engagement Conference 2020
    Sojo Monzon, V ; Wheeler, M ; Sojo Monzon, V ; Wheeler, M (The University of Melbourne, 2020-06-19)
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    Expressions of masculinity and associations with suicidal ideation among young males
    King, TL ; Shields, M ; Sojo, V ; Daraganova, G ; Currier, D ; O’Neil, A ; King, K ; Milner, A (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-12)
    Background Adolescent boys and young men are at particular risk of suicide. Suicidal ideation is an important risk factor for suicide, but is poorly understood among adolescent males. Some masculine behaviors have been associated with deleterious effects on health, yet there has been little quantitative examination of associations between masculinity and suicide or suicidal ideation, particularly among boys/young men. This study aimed to examine associations between conformity to masculine norms and suicidal ideation in a sample of adolescents. Methods A prospective cohort design, this study drew on a sample of 829 Australian boys/young men from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health. Boys were 15–18 years at baseline, and 17–20 years at follow-up. Masculine norms (Wave 1), were measured using the Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory (CMNI-22). Suicidal ideation (Wave 2) was a single-item from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Logistic regression analysis was conducted, adjusting for available confounders including parental education, Indigenous Australian identity and area disadvantage. Results In adjusted models, greater conformity to violent norms (OR = 1.23, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.03–1.47) and self-reliance norms (OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.15–1.70) was associated with higher odds of reporting suicidal ideation. Greater conformity to norms regarding heterosexuality was associated with reduced odds of reporting suicidal ideation (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.68–0.91). Conclusions These results suggest that conforming to some masculine norms may be deleterious to the mental health of young males, placing them at greater risk of suicidal ideation. The results highlight the importance of presenting young males with alternative and multiple ways of being a male. Facilitating a relaxation of norms regarding self-reliance, and encouraging help-seeking, is vital. Furthermore, dismantling norms that rigidly enforce masculine norms, particularly in relation to heteronormativity, is likely to benefit the broad population of males, not only those who do not conform to heterosexual and other masculine norms.