Management and Marketing - Research Publications

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    What works, what’s fair? Using systematic reviews to build the evidence base on strategies to increase gender equality in the public sector
    Sojo Monzon, V ; Ryan, M ; Fine, C ; Wheeler, M ; McGrath, M ; Roberts, V ; Arthur-Hulme, L ; Hadoux, R ; Western, K ; Sojo Monzon, V ( 2022-05-24)
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    Paper Promises? Evaluating the early impact of Australia’s Modern Slavery Act
    Dinshaw, F ; Sinclair, A ; Nolan, J ; Marshall, S ; Zirnsak, M ; Adams, K ; Keegan, P ; Boersma, M ; Bhakoo, V ; Moore, H (Human Rights Law Centre, Uniting Church in Australia, UNSW Sydney, University of Melbourne, RMIT University, 2022)
    The Modern Slavery Act 2018 (Cth) (MSA) was widely hailed as a critical first step by Australia towards tackling the global problem of modern slavery, with the government proclaiming that it would transform the way businesses respond to modern slavery by prompting a business-led ‘race to the top’.
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    Happier workers, healthier patients: An analysis of healthcare worker engagement and health service outcomes in Victoria
    Bell, S ; Garud, N ; Pati, R ; Sojo Monzon, V ; Healy, J ; Adamovic, M (Safer Care Victoria, Victorian Managed Insurance Authority., 2022-01-21)
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    The ‘good, bad and merit’ arguments in Australian news coverage of workplace gender diversity
    Sojo Monzon, V ; Fine, C ; Lawford-Smith, H ; Yang, Z ; Verspoor, C (The University of Melbourne and VicHealth, 2020-09-30)
    Research aims: In this study, we used the machine learning technique of topic modelling, as well as qualitative content analysis, on a large sample of articles published in high-circulation Australian printed media with the objectives to: 1. Explore the ways workplace gender diversity issues are discussed. 2. Identify the most common types of arguments for and against striving for greater workplace gender diversity. 3. Evaluate whether the year and month of publication, the type of diversity discussed and the sex of the author are related to the types of arguments for and against workplace gender diversity. Research contribution: Our findings indicate that the analysed articles were more likely to: • Focus on high-profile women (e.g., politicians, actors and influencers) and their life-styles, including trade-offs they had to make, rather than on discussions of the policies and practices organisations implement to manage workplace gender diversity, or on quantitative descriptions of the extent of gender inequality and lack of gender diversity. • Focus on discussions of sexism in the media industry and in particular high-profile workplace sexual harassment cases. • Present a narrow range of reasons for and against workplace gender diversity initiatives. • Focus on arguments in favour of increased workplace gender diversity when written by women (compared with men) and focus on risks to merit when written by men (compared with women).