Management and Marketing - Research Publications

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Now showing 1 - 10 of 108
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    Discourse and institutions
    Phillips, N ; Lawrence, TB ; Hardy, C (ACAD MANAGEMENT, 2004-10-01)
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    DISCOURSE AND DEINSTITUTIONALIZATION: THE DECLINE OF DDT
    Maguire, S ; Hardy, C (ACAD MANAGEMENT, 2009-02-01)
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    Testosterone-status mismatch lowers collective efficacy in groups: Evidence from a slope-as-predictor multilevel structural equation model
    Zyphur, MJ ; Narayanan, J ; Koh, G ; Koh, D (ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE, 2009-11-01)
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    Merging, Masquerading and Morphing: Metaphors and the World Wide Web
    Pablo, Z ; Hardy, C (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2009-08-01)
    We examine the role of metaphors in relation to Web-based phenomena through a comparative study of 29 Web portals, established under a World Bank project known as the Development Gateway. Our analysis suggests that three metaphors — expert, market and community — are particularly significant across these portals, either separately or in combination. The study indicates three particular ways in which these metaphors can combine — merging, masquerading and morphing. We conclude by discussing the implications of using metaphor to understand how practitioners design Web portals and how users engage with them.
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    Work, organisation and Enterprise Resource Planning systems: an alternative research agenda
    Dery, K ; Grant, D ; Harley, B ; Wright, C (WILEY, 2006-11-01)
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    Driving a resource orientation: reviewing the role of resource and capability characteristics
    Chmielewski, DA ; Paladino, A ; Ghobadian, A (EMERALD GROUP PUBLISHING LTD, 2007-01-01)
    Purpose This study seeks to introduce the role of resource and capability characteristics as drivers of a resource orientation (RO) and to examine empirically these relationships in different market conditions. Design/methodology/approach This study was conducted using a nation‐wide survey distributed to key informants of multiple business units. Multiple regression was used to assess the relationships. RO is used as a proxy for the implementation of the resource‐based view (RBV). The RO is also tested against performance outcomes to examine the robustness of the model that has been examined. Findings Findings showed significant relationships between resource and capability characteristics and RO. These relationships were shown to be robust across various market conditions. RO also depicted significant, positive relationships with all four performance indicators that were assessed. Industry conditions were found to strengthen some of these relationships. Research limitations/implications The results are limited to cross‐sectional data that prevent the determination of causality. In addition, it is a nation‐specific study that may not be generalisable to alternative settings. This presents an opportunity for further research to replicate this study in other nations and/or industries. The research presents implications for further theory development and suggests that management can focus on developing unique resource bundles to improve company performance; however, they will need to be attentive to the competitive environment in which they compete. Originality/value This is the first study that empirically evaluates drivers of an RO and further tests the scale that was applied by Paladino. Additionally, this study illustrates that the RBV can be empirically tested through the use of an RO to have a demonstrable impact on financial and non‐financial elements of performance.
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    The fox and the hedgehog go to work - A natural history of workplace collusion
    Sewell, G (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2008-02-01)
    The author argues that an ironic approach to collusion can help shift the focus of resistance away from the relatively rare events surrounding implacable opposition or total unanimity to the quotidian aspects of workplace politics. Collusion is characterized as an outcome of organizational politics conducted between the traditionally opposed parties of radical industrial sociology (i.e., managers and workers) under the guidance of an ironic mode of cognition. Irony is depicted as a foxlike way of gaining “a perspective on perspectives,” which provides a means of understanding stalemate, accommodation, and collusion by showing how opposing ideological positions are indebted. It also illuminates the moments when collusion breaks down and resisting parties become implacably opposed hedgehogs (one position prevails over the other), leading to overt conflict and resistance.
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    Online consultation: E-Democracy and E-Resistance in the Case of the Development Gateway
    Ainsworth, S ; Harley, B (SAGE Publications, 2005-01-01)
    To explore the implications of the Internet for the relationship between organizational communication and power, this article compares two online forums established in response to the introduction of a new e-organization: the Development Gateway. The article analyzes postings to the forums to explore the capacity of the Internet to foster democracy, and to investigate how power and resistance are exercised through this medium. Findings show that, rather than equate resistance with participation, as some models of democracy do, the dynamics of power and resistance are more complex, and resistance and power can take participative and nonparticipative forms.!