School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

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    Effects of Progesterone on Mammary Carcinogenesis by DMBA Applied Directly to Rat Mammae
    JABARA, AG ; MARKS, GN ; SUMMERS, JE ; ANDERSON, PS (Springer Nature, 1979-01-01)
    The effects and site(s) of action of progesterone on DMBA mammary carcinogenesis in the rat, when a small dose of the carcinogen was applied directly to the inguinal mammary gland, were investigated. No reduction in tumour yield was apparent when progesterone was administered s.c. for 18 days before dusting DMBA. This finding contrasts with a previously reported inhibitory effect on carcinogenesis when hormone treatment was followed by intragastric administration of DMBA. When progesterone injections were begun either 2 days before or 2 days after direct application of DMBA, and were continued until the end of the experiment (135 or 195 days) an enhancement in carcinogenesis was observed similar to that previously demonstrated after gastric intubation of DMBA. These findings, together with previously reported observations, suggest that progesterone may exert its inhibitory effect on carcinogenesis by acting at a site outside the breast, perhaps on the liver. However, it is likely that the hormone acts directly on the mammary tissue to exert its enhancing effect on tumorigenesis.
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    Aggression The Myth of the Beast Within
    Klama, J ; Kohn, T ; Durant, J ; Klopfer, P ; Honore, E ; Klopfer, L ; Lesley, B ; Nur, N ; Oyama, S ; Klopfer, M (John Wiley & Sons, 1988)
    Clears up popular misconceptions about aggression, traces the development of aggression in animals, and offers suggestions on taking advantage of our natural potential for cooperation
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    Combating Age Barriers in Job Recruitment and Training: UK Report
    TAYLOR, P ; Walker, A (European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions, 1996)
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    Too Old at 50
    TAYLOR, P ; Walker, A (Campaign for Work, 1991)
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    Gradual retirement in the United Kingdom
    TAYLOR, P ; Walker, A ; Delsen, L ; Reday-Mulvey, G (Dartmouth Publishing Company, 1996)
    6. Gradual. retirement. in. the. United. Kingdom. Philip. Taylor. and. Alan. Walker. The aging of the work force and the organisation of the public pension system are currently high on the political agenda in the UK. In recent years government ...
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    The art trade
    Casey, B ; Taylor, P ; Eckstein, J ; Moody, D ; Muir, A ; Shaw, C (Informa UK Limited, 1995-01)
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    Utilising older workers
    TAYLOR, P ; Walker, A (Department of Employment, 1995)
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    Managing an Ageing Workforce in Britain and France
    Guillemard, A-M ; Taylor, P ; Walker, A (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 1996-10)
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    Age discrimination and public policy
    Taylor, P ; Walker, A (MCB UNIV PRESS LTD, 1997-01-01)
    Reviews government and employer policies towards older workers and shows that there has been a massive decline in economic activity among older workers over the last two decades. The major cause is identified as economic recession which has encouraged employers, with the support of government, to target older workers for redundancy. In addition, older workers have been over‐represented in declining industries. Once out in the labour market older workers face considerable age discrimination. Recently, population ageing has encouraged all political parties to revise their policies on age and employment. Each now recognizes the value of older workers, although there is fundamental disagreement about the best means of encouraging employers to change their practices. The then Conservative government favoured a voluntary approach while the Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats have been more favourably disposed towards comprehensive legislation outlawing age discrimination. Argues that a combination of both approaches is desirable and, moreover, that it will also be necessary to revise policies on training, pensions and social security.