School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

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    Ideas and crisis in policy and administration: Existing links and research frontiers
    Hannah, A ; Baekkeskov, E ; Tubakovic, T (WILEY, 2022-05-22)
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    The Hope Burden: Envisioning a better world is hard work, even when you’re young
    Ravn, S (Sociological Review Foundation, 2022-04-05)
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    Perceptions of Safety Among Taxi and Rideshare Service Patrons: Gender, Safekeeping And Responsibilisation
    Fileborn, B ; Cama, E ; Young, A (Queensland University of Technology, 2022-01-01)
    Rideshare and taxi services may commonly be perceived as safer modes of travel, particularly in comparison to public transport, and the introduction of rideshare services such as Uber has transformed urban mobilities. Yet, there is emerging anecdotal evidence to suggest that both taxi and rideshare services are sites of sexual harassment and violence. However, little is known about passengers’ perceptions of safety when using taxis and rideshare services, an issue with significant implications for mobility, civic participation and social inclusion. To address this gap, we explore findings from an online survey and one-on-one interviews with rideshare and taxi patrons to examine their perceptions of safety when using taxi and rideshare services and the factors that facilitate or impede feelings of safety, including the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic. In closing, we consider the implications of the findings for conceptualisations of safety, developing policy and practice, and future research.
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    Evolving Understandings of Bingo in Four Decades of Literature: From Eyes Down to New Vistas
    Maltzahn, K ; Cox, J ; MacLean, S ; Whiteside, M ; Lee, H (University of Alberta Libraries, 2022-03-07)
    Bingo is a distinct, enduring but understudied form of gambling. It provides comfort and pleasure to many of its players while also causing harm to some. While traditionally seen as low harm, it is being reshaped by technological and regulatory change. Despite this, there is no recent overview of the literature on bingo. This narrative review seeks to fill this gap by exploring the development of literature on bingo since the 1980s, first providing a chronological overview of writing on bingo and then a brief account of major themes in the literature. The literature reviewed was primarily identified through searches of academic databases using search terms such as betting, bingo, electronic and gambling. We find that bingo research makes a number of important contributions: it allows better understanding of groups of overlooked gamblers, corrects biases in gambling literature, highlights the importance of social and structural factors in understanding gambling and employs methodological approaches that are congruent with the people and practices being studied.  Additionally, it provides new perspectives on gambling in terms of skill, affect, harm and control and offers a distinct viewpoint to analyse gambling and other phenomena.
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    Remnants of mutilation in anti-FGM law in Australia: a reply to 'The prosecution of Dawoodi Bohra women' by Richard Shweder
    Rogers, J (BRISTOL UNIV PRESS & POLICY PRESS, 2022-02-01)
    This article examines the absence of discussion about male circumcision in the first legal case against female circumcision in Australia, the Vaziri and Magennis case of 2015, 2018 and 2019, where the High Court of Australia prosecuted three people for practising female circumcision. It engages with the work of Rick Shweder on this case, arguing that what powerfully informs legal cases on this topic in Australia is less anthropological or medical evidence, than anti-female genital mutilation advocacy in the forms of literature and activism. These forms of anti-female genital mutilation discourse, the article argues, obscure the obvious comparison between male circumcision – as a ritual or ceremony that results in the production of a man as a man of God or of the nation – and female circumcision, which is understood as a mutilation. In lieu of the missed comparison, the result of this representation in legal and fictional texts is a rendering of the woman as unable to authorise her own agency, that is, as a remnant of mutilation, a rendering that is far from accurate.
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    Harm Imbrication and Virtualised Violence: Reconceptualising the Harms of Doxxing
    Anderson, B ; Wood, MA (QUEENSLAND UNIV TECHNOLOGY, 2022-01-01)
    This article develops a framework for analysing the harms of doxxing: the practice of publishing personal identifying information about someone on the internet, usually with malicious intent. Doxxing is not just a breach of privacy, nor are its effects limited to first‑order harms to an individual’s bodily integrity. Rather, doxxing increases the spectre of second-order harms to an individual’s security interests. To better understand these harms—and the relationships between them—we draw together the theories of Bhaskar, Deleuze and Levi to develop two concepts: the virtualisation of violence and harm imbrication. The virtualisation of violence captures how, when concretised into structures, the potential for harm can be virtualised through language, writing and digitisation. We show that doxxed information virtualises violence through constituting harm-generating structures and we analyse how the virtual harm-generating potential of these structures is actualised through first- and second-order harms against a doxxing victim. The concept of harm imbrication, by contrast, helps us to analyse the often-imbricated and supervenient relationship between harms. In doing so, it helps us explain the emergent – and supervenient – relationship between doxxing’s first- and second-order harms.
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    Self-managed aged home care in Australia - Insights from older people, family carers and service providers
    Laragy, C ; Vasiliadis, SD (WILEY, 2021-12-30)
    This paper presents findings from the evaluation of an Australian trial of self-managed home aged care. The self-management model was codesigned by advocacy organisation COTA Australia, consumers and service providers. The primary aim of the evaluation was to examine whether self-management improved consumers' perceptions of their choice, control, and wellbeing. The secondary aim was to examine whether provider prior experience with self-managed packages significantly influenced consumers' perceptions of choice, control and wellbeing, thereby confounded trial effects. A pre-test post-test quasi-experimental design and mixed-methods design were used to collect data over nine months in 2018-2019. The pre-trial methods and findings have been published. The post-trial evaluation replicated the pre-trial data collection method of an online survey (n = 60) and semi-structured telephone interviews with consumers (n = 9), family carers (n = 13), and consumers and carers jointly (n = 2), totalling 24 interviews. Semi-structured telephone interviews were also conducted with CEOs and senior managers from each of the seven providers (n = 14). Three providers had prior experience supporting self-management. Parametric and non-parametric tests examined the statistical data. Qualitative data were analysed thematically and framed according to self-determination principles and ecological systems theory. Both datasets demonstrated that consumers reported greater choice and control at post-trial than pre-trial. This finding was not affected by providers' prior experience with self-management; therefore, it was not a confounding factor. Participants reported improved wellbeing in interviews, however this was not reinforced statistically. Key desirable features of self-management included greater autonomy and control over spending, recruiting support staff and paying lower administration fees. There was no evidence of increased risks or fraud. The research limitations included a small sample size, convenience sampling with providers recruiting interview participants, no control group and differences in trial implementation. The findings support the expansion of self-management opportunities and more comprehensive evaluations that use mixed methods.
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    Children's sleep and fathers' health and wellbeing: A systematic review
    Coles, L ; Thorpe, K ; Smith, S ; Hewitt, B ; Ruppanner, L ; Bayliss, O ; O'Flaherty, M ; Staton, S (W B SAUNDERS CO LTD, 2021-12-09)
    Night-waking is typical across infancy and early childhood, inevitably disrupting family sleep. For some children, sleep problems develop and endure throughout childhood. This systematic review focused on fathers, and synthesised the evidence pertaining to the effects of children's sleep (from birth to 12 years) on fathers' health and wellbeing. A total of 29 studies were included. Key outcomes reported for fathers were: sleep and fatigue; mental and general health; and family functioning. An association between child sleep and father's sleep was observed when child's sleep was measured via actigraphy or paternal report, but not when measured via maternal report, suggesting that mothers may not always be aware of disruptions that awaken fathers. Findings showed poorer child sleep was associated with poorer general health and wellbeing among fathers, however, associations of poor child sleep with depression were fewer, and less frequent than those reported for mothers in the same households. Poor child sleep was negatively associated with the quality of family relationships, both within the couple and between parent and child. Future studies seeking to understand the interplay of child sleep and family wellbeing should apply objective measurement of sleep and integrate formal measures of family dynamics into the study design.
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    Social Sustainability and Ulaanbaatar's 'Ger Districts': Access and Mobility Issues and Opportunities
    Hamiduddin, I ; Fitzpatrick, D ; Plueckhahn, R ; Sangi, U ; Batjargal, E ; Sumiyasuren, E (MDPI, 2021-10-01)
    This paper explores the concept of social sustainability in Ulaanbaatar’s ger districts in relation to access and mobility. Although ger districts are well-established in Mongolian culture as ephemeral encampments with transient residents, contemporary ger districts have become large and permanent residential districts that are now home to an estimated one-third of the country’s population. The more recent growth of the ger districts has taken place in three decades since Mongolia embraced market-based liberal economics, coinciding with waves of socially and economically-motivated urbanisation. More recently, difficult environmental conditions in rural Mongolia have created new waves of migration. The unfolding situation means that the ger districts have grown with little of the forward planning present in other built areas of the city. In turn, this has led to significant imbalances in the provision of transport services into the ger districts and the problems of access and mobility that this paper has highlighted. This paper has identified community-based local transport and delivery services as one potential means for addressing existing access and mobility shortcomings. Such approaches could provide temporary or complementary services alongside other public policy approaches.