School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

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    Who Is the Subject of Queer Criminology? Unravelling the Category of the Paedophile
    McDonald, D ; Dwyer, A ; Ball, M ; Crofts, T (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)
    In the foreword to a recent special edition of Critical Criminology, Ball, Buist, and Woods write that queer criminology ‘can speak to a number of people and communities. It can take us down multiple paths, and it can remain an open space of intellectual and political contestation’ (2014: 4). Using this observation as a starting point, this chapter examines the subject to which queer criminology speaks. As this book attests, queer criminology is a comparatively new orientation. While criminology has addressed issues of sexual difference, it has generally posited a particular kind of ‘queer’ subject — predominantly those who identify as gay, lesbian, and more recently bisexual or trans. Compounding this shortcoming are the scenarios in which sexual difference has traditionally been interrogated. For example, victimisation has overwhelmingly been preoccupied with prejudice-motivated crime and interpersonal violence. On the other hand, research examining scenarios of queer criminality have typically pivoted around sexual deviance and sex work. Peterson and Panfil insightfully observe that the consequence of this tradition has been to produce a narrow frame of sexed and gendered difference within criminological scholarship (2014: 3)
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    Accountability in global economic governance
    MacDonald, K ; Brown, C ; Eckersley, R (Oxford University Press, 2018-04-05)
    Contemporary theoretical debates surrounding accountability in global economic governance have often adopted a problem-focused analytical lens—centred on real-world political controversies surrounding the accountability of global governing authorities. This chapter explores four distinctive problems of global accountability for which empirical inquiry has usefully informed normative analysis: first, the problem of unaccountable power within global governance processes; second, the problem of decentred political authority in global governance; third, problems establishing appropriate foundations of social power through which normatively desirable transnational accountabilities can be rendered practically effective at multiple scales; finally, problems associated with the need to traverse significant forms of social and cultural difference in negotiating appropriate normative terms of transnational accountability relationships. In relation to each, this chapter examines how systematic engagement between empirical and normative modes of analysis can both illuminate the theoretical problem and inform practical political strategies for strengthening accountability in global economic governance.
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    Canada, Australia and New Zealand and the Islamic State
    Conduit, D ; Malet, D ; West, L ; Covarrubias, J ; Lansford, T ; Pauly, RJ (ROUTLEDGE, 2016-01-01)
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    Charting a new course? Testing Rouhani's foreign policy agency in the Iran-Syria relationship
    Akbarzadeh, S ; Conduit, D ; Akbarzadeh, S ; Conduit, D (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016-04-08)
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    The ‘Inside-Track’ Approach to Change in Iran Under President Rouhani: The Case of Freedom on the Internet
    Conduit, D ; Akbarzadeh, S ; Barlow, R ; Akbarzadeh, S (Springer, 2018)
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    The Iranian Reform movement since 2009
    Conduit, D ; Akbarzadeh, S ; Akbarzadeh, S ; Conduit, D (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-09-27)
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    Moving towards Ecological Regulation: The Role of Criminalisation
    Haines, F ; Parker, C ; Holley, C ; Shearing, C (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2017)
    Contemporary society faces multiple and interacting environmental challenges that require transformational change in the conduct of business. We take one of these challenges, the need to combat anthropogenic climate change, to interrogate what is required in transforming business regulation towards what we term ‘ecological regulation’. This transition requires us to grapple with how business regulation is currently framed and how change will effect such regulation. Regulation is largely premised both on the benefits of economic competition and for the control of particular harms to take place in an discrete case-by-case manner. Current moral and legal strategies used by activists in attempting to engender a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by business interact with current forms of regulation in distinct ways. The former involves activists staking a moral case for criminalisation of ecological damage through naming and shaming strategies. This may shift the moral boundaries of acceptable business behaviour. The latter is achieved by ‘bracing’ greenhouse gas reduction with existing business regulation that can bring some legal accountability to bear. We show how these strategies begin to reframe regulatory regimes as well as what ecological regulation might look like if full legal authority in enshrining a respect for ecological limits were added the contemporary framing of business regulation.
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    Regulation and risk
    Haines, F ; Drahos, P (ANU Press, 2017)
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    Sovereignty, democracy, and global political legitimacy
    MacDonald, T ; Brown, C ; Eckersley, R (Oxford University Press, 2018-04-05)

    This chapter argues that the normative theories of democracy invoked in debates about global democracy construe the institutional ingredients of democracy’s political legitimacy too narrowly: they focus on contributions to political legitimacy made by institutions of democratic social choice-making, such as elections and public deliberative structures, while neglecting those made by institutionalized governance capabilities, of the kind historically embodied in sovereign states. This narrow focus becomes problematic when we shift our focus to democratization at the global level, where key governance functions of sovereign institutions are weak or absent. To understand the institutional prerequisites for political legitimacy within a global democracy, I argue that we therefore need to build and apply a broader theoretical understanding of political legitimacy that can more systematically account for its governance capability dimensions.

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    Global political justice
    MACDONALD, T ; Held, D ; Maffettone, P (Wiley, 2016)
    Scholarly debate on the subject of global justice has been overwhelmingly focused so far on the socio-economic aspects of justice. Much less attention has been given to those political aspects of global justice concerned with arrangements for public decision-making and the collective exercise and control of power. This gap is not adequately filled by literatures on global democracy, either, since these do not incorporate sufficient analysis of whether the democratic institutions that deliver political justice within states can achieve the same result when dealing with the very different forms of power and political agency that structure the domain of global politics. This collection brings together scholars from across the disciplines of political theory, normative ethics, and International Relations to undertake a fresh examination of some fundamental theoretical questions about the nature and significance of global political justice. Contributors tackle several dimensions of this complex theoretical topic, exploring questions about: the relationship of global political justice to other normative standards like ‘legitimacy’,‘democracy’, and ‘socio-economic’justice; the nature of global ‘public power’and the prospects for global political community; the justice and continued significance of traditional ordering principles of sovereignty and territoriality; and the relevance of standards of political justice (like political equality) to the regulation of international violence and principles of just war. This book was originally published as a special issue of Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.