School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

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    Teaching Policy Design: Themes, Topics & Techniques
    Bali, AS ; Bakir, C ; Howlett, M ; Lewis, JM ; Schmidt, S (Editora Blucher, 2021-12-01)
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    Development of the Suicide Ideation Attributes Scale-Modified (SIDAS-M) for autistic adults
    Hedley, D ; Batterham, P ; Gallagher, E ; Denney, K ; Hayward, S ; Uljarević, M ; Bury, S ; Clapperton, A ; Robinson, J ; Trollor, J ; Stokes, M (INSAR, 2021)
    There are currently few instruments specifically designed or adapted to assess suicide risk in the autistic population. The Suicidal Ideation Attributes Scale (SIDAS) is a 5-item assessment of suicidal ideation that is commonly used and well-validated in suicide research. Unlike other instruments that primarily assess past suicidal behavior (e.g., Suicide Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised; SBQ-R), SIDAS focuses on recent (4-week) ideation making it useful for identifying current risk. SIDAS demonstrates a single factor, good internal consistency, and convergent validity. In addition to strong psychometric properties, its clear questions and straightforward design make it a strong candidate for suicide risk assessment in the autistic population. Therefore, we followed current gold-standard recommendations for measurement development and modification, as well as coproduction with autistic people, to derive and validate a modified version of the instrument (SIDAS-M) specifically adapted for use with autistic adults with a diverse range of abilities.
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    Post-Symposium Reflections: A Panel Discussion
    Polaschek, D ; Daffern, M ; Day, A ; Tamatea, A ; Tamatea, A (University of Waikato, 2021-06)
    A panel discussion to share and discuss reflections.
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    The Economic Cost of Child and Adolescent Bullying in Australia
    Jadambaa, A ; Brain, D ; Pacella, R ; Thomas, HJ ; McCarthy, M ; Scott, JG ; Graves, N (ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2021-02-22)
    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis and estimate the economic costs attributable to child and adolescent bullying victimization in Australia. METHOD: The costs of bullying victimization were measured from a societal perspective that accounted for costs associated with health care, education resources, and productivity losses. A prevalence-based approach was used to estimate the annual costs for Australians who experienced bullying victimization in childhood and adolescence. This study updated a previous systematic review summarizing the association between bullying victimization and health and nonhealth outcomes. Costs were estimated by calculating population attributable fractions to determine the effects of bullying victimization on increased risk of adverse health outcomes, such as anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, intentional self-harm, and tobacco use. A top-down approach to cost estimation was taken for all outcomes of interest except for costs incurred by educational institutions and productivity losses of victims' caregivers, for which a bottom-up cost estimation was applied. RESULTS: Annual costs in Australian dollars (AUD) in 2016 on health and nonhealth outcomes attributable to child and adolescent bullying victimization were estimated at AUD $763 million: AUD $750 million for health system costs with AUD $147 million for anxiety disorders, AUD $322 million for depressive disorders, AUD $57 million for intentional self-harm, and AUD $224 million for tobacco use; AUD $7.5 million for productivity losses of victims' caregivers; and AUD $6 million for educational services. CONCLUSION: The findings from this study suggest a substantial annual cost to Australian society as a result of bullying victimization with more than 8% of annual mental health expenditure in Australia estimated to be attributable to bullying victimization.
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    Framing Unpacked: A Semi-Supervised Interpretable Multi-View Model of Media Frames
    Khanehzar, S ; Cohn, T ; Mikolajczak, G ; Turpin, A ; Frermann, L (Association for Computational Linguistics, 2021)
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    The IAEA’s Role in Nuclear Security Since 2016
    Findlay, T (Nuclear Threat Initiative, 2019-02-01)
    The paper considers the performance of the International Atomic Energy Agency following the last Nuclear Security Summit in 2016
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    Regional Tools to Strengthen Nuclear Security: Asia-Pacific
    Findlay, T (Nuclear Threat Initiative, 2019-11-30)
    The paper considers the practice of nuclear security in the Asia-Pacific region and how it might be strengthened.
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    The Analytic Possibilities of 'Culture' in a Post-Prison Context
    Johns, D (Elsevier BV, 2014)
    This paper is focused on the use and usefulness of ‘culture’ as an analytical tool, in the context of prisoners’ return to the community. Whereas the analytic dimensions of the culture concept have been explored in anthropological circles, its criminological applications have been limited. While the growth of ‘cultural criminology’ signifies a resurgent interest in ethnography, subjectivity, lived experience and the phenomenological, for instance, it can be argued that its concept of culture lacks explanatory or analytical power. This paper considers the analytic possibilities of ‘culture’ as a tool for uncovering aspects of the post-imprisonment experience. It draws on interviews with released prisoners and post-release support workers, conducted for PhD research on the post-release experience of men in Victoria, to illustrate how culture applied in this way can illuminate processes underpinning and constituting the cycle of reimprisonment, or what Halsey (2006) has termed the ‘reincarceration assemblage’. Seeing culture as both a ‘product and producer’ (Sampson & Bean, 2006) of this assemblage reveals elements which contribute to the continuation of the cycle, and which can counteract efforts – on the part of ex-prisoners themselves and society more broadly – towards reintegration and reduced reoffending. A cultural perspective can thus provide a way of understanding men’s experience of getting out and staying out of prison, and how penological thinking may make use of such a lens.
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    A Social Ecological Approach to ‘Child Friendly’ Youth Justice
    Johns, D ; Bateman, T ; Goodfellow, P ; Little, R ; Wigzell, A (National Association for Youth Justice (NAYJ), 2018)
    This paper draws on research on young people’s prolific offending in Wales, and youth justice responses to it, between 2009 and 2015. A case study of twelve young people, and the YOT workers who supervised and supported them through their teenage years, illustrates how seeing young people through the lens of interactions and relationships – with family, peers, community and the broader socio-cultural-political context – gives insight into the type of interventions that can most effectively disrupt their offending and enhance their wellbeing. These insights have implications for the way in which youth offending teams engage with young people, to bring about positive change in their lives. We argue that interrupting persistent and prolific offending patterns requires a long-term, relationship-focused approach that supports young people’s positive identity development, in its social context. I outline the key features of such an approach and how and why it exemplifies ‘child-friendly’ youth justice.