School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

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    Accountability in global economic governance
    MacDonald, K ; Brown, C ; Eckersley, R (Oxford University Press, 2018-04-05)
    Contemporary theoretical debates surrounding accountability in global economic governance have often adopted a problem-focused analytical lens—centred on real-world political controversies surrounding the accountability of global governing authorities. This chapter explores four distinctive problems of global accountability for which empirical inquiry has usefully informed normative analysis: first, the problem of unaccountable power within global governance processes; second, the problem of decentred political authority in global governance; third, problems establishing appropriate foundations of social power through which normatively desirable transnational accountabilities can be rendered practically effective at multiple scales; finally, problems associated with the need to traverse significant forms of social and cultural difference in negotiating appropriate normative terms of transnational accountability relationships. In relation to each, this chapter examines how systematic engagement between empirical and normative modes of analysis can both illuminate the theoretical problem and inform practical political strategies for strengthening accountability in global economic governance.
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    Containing conflict: Authoritative transnational actors and the management of company-community conflict
    MacDonald, K ; Malet, D ; Anderson, M (Georgetown University Press, 2017-01-01)
    Amidst intensified competition for land available to private investors in sectors such as mining, agribusiness and forestry, disputes over land between transnational investors and local communities are emerging in many parts of the world as an increasingly visible form of transnational conflict. Whereas land conflicts were once seen as a quintessentially ‘local’ problem, to be managed by national or sub-national political authorities, they are now becoming transnationally politicized. Such conflicts may be expressed in episodes of violent confrontation between members of local communities and police, military or private security officials. At other times, they take the form of non-violent resistance or protest, or are channeled through formal political, administrative or legal channels for managing social and political contestation.
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    Re-thinking market governance
    Macdonald, K ; Marshall, S ; Pinto, S (Routledge, 2012-12-01)
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    Contextualising the Business Responsibility to Respect: How Much Is Lost in Translation?
    Haines, F ; Macdonald, K ; Balaton-Chrimes, S (Brill | Nijhoff, 2012-01-01)
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    The Socially Embedded Corporation
    Macdonald, K ; Mikler, J (Wiley, 2013-03-26)
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    Transnational Business and the Politics of Social Risk: Re-Embedding Transnational Supply Chains
    MACDONALD, K ; Marshall, S ; Lange, B ; Haines, F ; Thomas, D (Hart Pub Limited, 2015-08-27)
    This collection, located in the wider debates about global capitalism and its regulation, tackles the challenge of finding a way forward for regulation.
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    How should we conceive of individual consumer responsibility to address labour injustices?
    Barry, C ; MacDonald, K ; Dahan, Y ; Lerner, H ; Milman-Sivan, F (Cambridge University Press, 2016)
    Many approaches to addressing labour injustices—shortfalls from minimally decent wages and working conditions— focus on how governments should orient themselves toward other states in which such phenomena take place, or to the firms that are involved with such practices. But of course the question of how to regard such labour practices must also be faced by individuals, and individual consumers of the goods that are produced through these practices in particular. Consumers have become increasingly aware of their connections to complex global production processes that often involve such injustice. For example, activist campaigns have exposed wrongful harm in factories producing clothes, shoes and mobile phones and farms producing coffee, tea and cocoa. These campaigns have promoted the message to ordinary people that by becoming connected to unjust labour practices through their purchasing behaviour, they acquire special additional moral responsibilities to contribute to reforming such practices, or to address the hardships suffered by the victims of the wrongdoing that result from them.