School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

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    Australia's trade policy dilemmas
    Capling, A (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2008-06-01)
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    Listening, learning, steering: new governance, communication and interactive policy formation
    Crozier, M (POLICY PRESS, 2008-01-01)
    Western political systems have undergone significant shifts in recent decades. In the era of post-war mass democracy governments governed and political communication informed. Now, however, governance includes non-government as well as government actors, and a communications dynamic pervades the entire political system. This article examines the integration of governance and communication, conceptualising the interactive strategies associated with new governance patterns in communications terms. The core argument is that the emergence of recursive forms of communication and knowledge production are indicative of systemic imperatives at work that are producing novel patterns of social coordination and policy formation.
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    From cosmopolitan nationalism to cosmopolitan democracy
    Eckersley, R (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2007-10-01)
    This article offers both a critique and reconstruction of cosmopolitan democracy. It argues that cosmopolitan democracy promotes an excessively individualist account of political life and a functionalist approach to political community that are likely to undermine the kinds of national communities and citizens that are most likely to mobilise against global injustices. It argues that the alleviation of global injustices depends on the rescuing and reframing, rather than weakening, of national identities so that they take on a more cosmopolitan character. Cosmopolitan democracy is dependent upon cosmopolitan nationalism, based on a commitment to common liberty and justice at home and abroad.
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    A green public sphere in the WTO?: The Amicus curiae interventions in the transatlantic biotech dispute
    Eckersley, R (SAGE Publications, 2007-09-01)
    The WTO's decision-making model of executive multilateralism has been widely criticized for its lack of accountability to civil society. However, through the mechanism of the amicus curiae brief, nongovernment organizations and other civil society actors have found a way of directly `inserting' the public interest concerns of civil society into the dispute resolution arm of the WTO, which has proved to be more amenable to `critical public reason' than the trade negotiation arm. This article critically explores both the text and context of the amicus briefs submitted in the transatlantic biotech dispute and highlights their role in generating a green cosmopolitan public sphere that seeks more reflexive modernization and facilitates horizontal forms of regime accountability. Cosmopolitan public spheres are conceptualized as specialized, intermediary structures, with multiple strategic and communicative functions, that mediate between supra-national governance structures and regional and domestic civil societies.
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    Ambushed: The Kyoto Protocol, the Bush administration's climate policy and the erosion of legitimacy
    Eckersley, R (Palgrave Macmillan (part of Springer Nature), 2007-03-01)
    The Kyoto Protocol has been ratified by 164 states and is now fully operational. However, the Bush administration's repudiation of the Protocol combined with the weakness of the targets raise a confronting question for students of legitimacy: is it possible for a regime to be legitimate but ineffective in solving the problem it is designed to address? I argue that effectiveness is an important component of the Protocol's legitimacy but that the parties have been reluctant to make an issue of effectiveness during the early phase of the Protocol's operation. However, the legitimacy of the Protocol is likely to wane, and the chronic international legitimacy crisis of the Bush administration's climate change policy is likely to become acute, as a result of poor performance. I conclude by suggesting what might constitute significant and timely adaptation that might resolve the US's chronic legitimacy crisis and the Protocol's waning legitimacy.
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    The proto-politics of reconciliation: Lefort and the aporia of forgiveness in Arendt and Derrida
    Schaap, A (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2006-12-01)
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    Governance and competition: The role of non-profit organisations in the delivery of public services
    Considine, M (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2003-03-01)
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