School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 14
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    A CHILD IS BEING MUTILATED
    Rogers, J (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2009-01-01)
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Strategies for Community-Based Drug Law Enforcement: From Prohibition to Harm Reduction
    Canty, C ; Sutton, A ; James, S ; Stockwell, T ; Gruenewald, PJ ; Toumbouorou, JW ; Loxley, W (BLACKWELL SCIENCE PUBL, 2005-01-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Pathways Model of Assault A Qualitative Analysis of the Assault Offender and Offense
    Chambers, JC ; Ward, T ; Eccleston, L ; Brown, M (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2009-09-01)
    Research on offending behavior rehabilitation suggests that offenders would gain the maximum benefit from programs that reflect the individual needs of different types of offender. Multivariate theories of offending behavior are thus required to inform individualized rehabilitation. The aim of the current study was to construct a multivariate model for the prolific offense of assault. Qualitative methodology was used to construct a descriptive model of assault for 25 adult assault offenders. The model incorporated the development of violent behavior, types of anger, violence motivation, and the assault offense. The model consisted of 14 categories, 10 of which allowed for individual differences in behavior. A total of 35 participant transcripts were then coded through the model where the individual differences occurred. Five main offense types were found. The characteristics of the types of assault offense gave indications for how rehabilitation may be targeted for each group.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    VANQUISHING THE ENEMY OR CIVILIZING THE NEIGHBOUR? CONTROLLING THE RISKS FROM HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIES
    Haines, F (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2009-09-01)
    Inclusion of the local community in a continuous dialogue aimed at reducing the risks posed by hazardous industries such as chemical plants and oil refineries is an increasingly common feature of some regulatory regimes. This article explores the implications of this regulatory shift for the reduction of risk through research undertaken in a major Australian city. The study found that local communities, when given a formal voice in regulatory regimes, did push industry to consider an extended range of risks. These risks included the risk of explosion or major chemical spill threatening health and the environment (termed here actuarial risks) but also concerns about the orderliness within the local neighbourhood and proper relationships between industry and community (risks of a more socio-cultural nature). Further, the escalation of political risk was critical in determining which actuarial and socio-cultural concerns of the community were listened to. Regulatory innovations involving increased accountability of hazardous industry to the local community may increase pressure on targeted industry to reduce risk, but the ensuing risk management is likely to involve political and socio-cultural as well as actuarial risks.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Screen of the Crime: Judging the Affect of Cinematic Violence
    YOUNG, A (Sage Publications, 2009)
    Discussions of screen violence polarize around the question of whether images can cause people to behave differently. Proponents of this position point to the influence of images in other contexts; its critics reject the implication that individuals can be so simplistically motivated. Such debate is intensified by events such as the Columbine or Virginia Tech shootings, where cultural products are named as the causes of lethal violence. This article engages with the assumption that the violence in violent imagery is a relatively homogeneous category. It explores paradigms of cinematic violence through the analysis of exemplary scenes from four representative films ( The Matrix, Reservoir Dogs , Natural Born Killers and Elephant), each of which has been linked to violence flowing in and from the image. Each shows multiple killings in highly graphic ways, yet each deploys different representational techniques to produce a range of affective responses in the spectator. As such, the article seeks to answer the question of how to judge the affect of cinematic violence and to investigate the implication of the spectator in the affects and aesthetics of screen violence.
  • Item
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The importance of being ambiguous: Theorising white-collar crime
    Haines, F ; Sutton, A ; Brannigan, A ; Pavlich, G (Routledge-Cavendish, 2007-02-22)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Rotten States.Corruption, Post-Communism and Neoliberalism
    HOLMES, L (Duke University Press, 2006)