School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 66
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Transforming Nuclear Safeguards Culture: The IAEA, Iraq, and the Future of Non-Proliferation
    Findlay, T (MIT Press, 2022-06-21)
    In Transforming Nuclear Safeguards Culture, Trevor Findlay investigates the role that organizational culture may play in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons, examining particularly how it affects the nuclear safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the paramount global organization in the non-proliferation field. Findlay seeks to identify how organizational culture may have contributed to the IAEA's failure to detect Iraq's attempts to acquire illicit nuclear capabilities in the decade prior to the 1990 Gulf War and how the agency has sought to change safeguards culture since then. In doing so, he addresses an important piece of the nuclear nonproliferation puzzle: how to ensure that a robust international safeguards system, in perpetuity, might keep non-nuclear states from acquiring such weapons. Findlay, as one of the leading scholars on the IAEA, brings a valuable holistic perspective to his analysis of the agency's culture. Transforming Nuclear Safeguards Culture will inspire debate about the role of organizational culture in a key international organization—a culture that its member states, leadership, and staff have often sought to ignore or downplay.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Food Journeys: Stories from the heart
    Rodrigues, J ; Kikon, D (Zubaan, 2023-10-20)
    Food Journeys is a powerful collection that draws on personal experiences, and the meaning of grief, rage, solidarity, and life. Feminist anthropologist Dolly Kikon and peace researcher Joel Rodrigues present a wide-ranging set of stories and essays accompanied by recipes. They bring together poets, activists, artists, writers, and researchers who explore how food and eating allow us to find joy and strength while navigating a violent history of militarization in Northeast India. Food Journeys takes us to the tea plantations of Assam, the lofty mountains of Sikkim, the homes of a brewer and a baker in Nagaland, a chef’s journey from Meghalaya, a trip to the paddy fields in Bangladesh, and many more sites, to reveal why people from Northeast India intimately care about what they eat and consider food an integral part of their history, politics, and community. Deliciously feminist and bold, Food Journeys is both an invitation and a challenge to recognize gender and lived experiences as critical aspects of political life.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Seeds and Food Sovereignty: Eastern Himalayan Experiences
    Deka, D ; Rodrigues, J ; Kikon, D ; Karlsson, BG ; Barbora, S ; Tula, M (North Eastern Social Research Centre, 2023-03-06)
    Crops and seeds are everywhere. They nourish our bodies, families, and communities, but are also taken for granted. Simultaneously, an increasing number of community organisations, farmer movements, and individuals are challenging corporate control and commodification of seeds. In the name of seed and food sovereignty, they seek to enhance local control over agriculture and ensure peoples’ rights to nutritious, ecologically-sound and culturally-appropriate food. In this book, the authors bring together resource persons, students, and researchers working across the Eastern Himalayan region, and, in doing so, they hope to facilitate new ways of learning together. The Eastern Himalayas are commonly characterised as a biodiversity hotspot, and this also applies to agrobiodiversity. The authors hope that this book will inspire further engagements with the ongoing farming initiatives and food sovereignty movements on the ground. Also featuring, Seno Tsuhah, Manorom Gogoi, Amba Jamir, Bhogtoram Mawroh, Mahan Chandra Borah, and Vilazonuo Gloria.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    The Made-Up State: Technology, Trans Femininity, and Citizenship in Indonesia
    Hegarty, B (Cornell University Press, 2022-12-15)
    In The Made-Up State, Benjamin Hegarty contends that warias, who compose one of Indonesia's trans feminine populations, have cultivated a distinctive way of captivating the affective, material, and spatial experiences of belonging to a modern public sphere. Combining historical and ethnographic research, Hegarty traces the participation of warias in visual and bodily technologies, ranging from psychiatry and medical transsexuality to photography and feminine beauty. The concept of development deployed by the modern Indonesian state relies on naturalizing the binary of "male" and "female." As historical brokers between gender as a technological system of classifying human difference and state citizenship, warias shaped the contours of modern selfhood even while being positioned as nonconforming within it. The Made-Up State illuminates warias as part of the social and technological format of state rule, which has given rise to new possibilities for seeing and being seen as a citizen in postcolonial Indonesia.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Iran in the world: President Rouhani's foreign policy
    Akbarzadeh, S ; Conduit, D ; Akbarzadeh, S ; Conduit, D (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016-04-08)
    This book evaluates President Hassan Rouhani's foreign policy during his first two years in office, looking at the case studies of Armenia, Azerbaijan, the UAE, Turkey, and Syria, as well as the Iran-US relationship. President Rouhani came to power in Iran in 2013 promising to reform the country's long-contentious foreign policy. His top priorities were rehabilitating the Iranian economy, ending the nuclear dispute, rebuilding relations with the US, and mending ties with Iran's neighbors. It is argued here that while President Rouhani has made progress in the Iran-US relationship, in nuclear negotiations and some bilateral relationships, his broader success has been hampered by regional political developments and domestic competition. Further, it is contended that his future success will be guided by emerging regional tensions, including whether Iran's neighbors will accept the terms of the nuclear agreement.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    New Opposition in the Middle East
    Conduit, D ; Akbarzadeh, S ; Conduit, D ; Akbarzadeh, S (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-09-27)
    This book uses a Contentious Politics lens to examine patterns of contestation since 2009 and 2011 among the Middle East's most important opposition actors. The volume is comprised of seven chapters that ask questions in relation to the responsiveness of opposition groups to their political environments, the long-term legacies of authoritarianism, and whether the post-2009/2011 political environment is better or worse for Middle Eastern oppositions. It interrogates the ways in which oppositions have morphed in relation to this changed operating environment, subjectively interpreting the costs and benefits of contestation in order to maximise political opportunities. To some oppositions, changes in the power balance between regime structures and opposition agents led to unprecedented opportunity for political action, while for others, structures were galvanised to restrict opposition activities. In total, the volume shows that even though the Arab Uprisings and Green Movement achieved few of their overt goals, the events unleashed smaller shifts across the region that have led to a fundamental change in the politics of contestation amongst the region�s oppositions. These patterns echo experiences in other parts of the world, including the coloured revolutions in post-Soviet states, and the political environment in Chile after Pinochet.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Muslim Brotherhood in Syria
    Conduit, D (Cambridge University Press, 2019)
    Having played a role in every iteration of Syrian politics since the country gained independence in 1946, the Muslim Brotherhood were the most prominent opposition group in Syria on the eve of the 2011 uprising. But when unrest broke out in March 2011, few Brotherhood flags and slogans were to be found within the burgeoning protest movement. Drawing on extensive primary research including interviews with Brotherhood members, Dara Conduit looks to the group's history to understand why it failed to capitalise on this advantage as the conflict unfolded, addressing significant gaps in accounts of the group's past to assess whether its reputation for violence and dogmatism is justified. In doing so, Conduit reveals a party that was neither as violent nor as undemocratic as expected, but whose potential to stage a long-awaited comeback was hampered by the shadow of its own history.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Barbarity of Our Own Countrymen
    Botsman, P (Working Papers, 2020)
    The ghost of Charles Throsby haunts south-west Sydney, the Illawarra, and the regions south to Lake George and west to Bathurst. He opposed the pattern of violence that would extend from Sydney to Tasmania and to the Port Phillip district (Victoria). The words of his Glenfield Farm letter of 5 April, 1816 reflect on Australia' s original sins: of barbarous violence, appropriation of Aboriginal lands, environmental destruction and subjugation of Aboriginal culture. "The barbarity of our fellow countrymen" is a 30,000 word reflection on the so-called "Sydney Wars" of 1814-1816 which set a pattern for the brutal usurpation of Aboriginal lands in Van Diemens Land (Tasmania), the Port Phillip district (Victoria) and other colonial settlements across the nation.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Unequal Lives: Gender, Race and Class in the Western Pacific
    Bainton, NA ; McDougall, D ; Alexeyeff, K ; Cox, J ; BAINTON, NA ; McDougall, D ; Alexeyeff, K ; Cox, J (ANU Press, 2021)
    This collection is a major contribution to academic and political debates about the perverse effects of inequality, which now ranks among the greatest challenges of our time. The inspiration for this volume derives from the breadth and depth of Martha Macintyre’s remarkable scholarship. The contributors celebrate Macintyre’s groundbreaking work, which exemplifies the explanatory power, ethical force and pragmatism that ensures the relevance of anthropological research to the lives of others and to understanding the global condition.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Ceasefire City Militarism, Capitalism, and Urbanism in Dimapur
    Kikon, D ; McDuie-Ra, D (Oxford University Press, 2021-01-30)
    While residents of Dimapur often talked about the crumbling infrastructure of the city, musicians and performers connected with everyday challenges that were not limited to power failures, load shedding, and unemployment, but also with ...