School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

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    Employees, employers and the institutions of work: The global competition for terrain in the ageing workforce agenda
    Jorgensen, B ; Taylor, P (Emerald, 2008-03-03)
    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess risks and prospects for older workers and to provide a number of recommendations designed to marshal the interests of employees, business and government. Design/methodology/approach The paper examines the terrain of competing interests and dynamic complexities of workforce ageing, by elaborating on the topic of economic globalisation, the policy approaches adopted by government, the actions taken by industry and the working and life preferences of older workers. Findings In the absence of a deep understanding of the current relationship between demographic ageing, the labour market and economic globalisation, the policy aspirations of government face the prospect of limited success. The currently popular premise, that ageing populations go hand‐in‐hand with ageing workforces, appears to be contradicted by much of the available evidence, which points to rather more complex scenarios, in which outcomes are uncertain, but clearly where late career workers may not necessarily fare well. Originality/value The paper brings analysis to the area of ageing populations and the labour market in the context of globalization – a complex and important topic that is usually dealt with far too simply.
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    Older workers, government and business: Implications for ageing populations of a globalising economy
    Jorgensen, B ; Taylor, P (John Wiley & Sons, 2008-03)
    Though there is a consensus surrounding the importance of people working at older ages – and in a more flexible way – trends in employment and trade patterns mean that existing policies are not as effective as they need to be.
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    They know it when they see it: The UK gender recognition act 2004
    Jeffreys, S (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2008-05)
    This article is a critical feminist analysis of the UK Gender Recognition Act of 2004. This Act is radical in enabling transgenders to gain certificates recognising their new ‘acquired gender’ without undergoing hormonal or surgical treatment. The Act has considerable implications for marriage, for motherhood and fatherhood, for women who are the partners of men or women who ‘transition’ and for ‘women-only’ spaces. It is based on confusing and contradictory notions of the difference between sex and gender. As such it should be of great interest to feminists but there has been a dearth of feminist commentary. The understandings of sex and gender and of the importance of the Act will be explored here through analysis of the parliamentary debates and public responses.
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    The Australian Dominative Medical System: A Reflection of Social Relations in the Larger Society
    Baer, H (WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC, 2008-12)
    This paper posits a working or tentative model of medical pluralism, a pattern in which multiple medical sub‐systems co‐exist, or what I term the Australian dominative medical system. I argue that whereas the Australian medical system with its various medical sub‐systems was pluralistic, that is more or less on an equal footing, in the nineteenth century, by the early twentieth century it became a plural or dominative one in the sense that biomedicine came to clearly dominate other medical sub‐systems. This paper also explores the growing interest of biomedicine and the Australian Government in complementary medicine to which Australians have increasingly turned over the course of the past three decades or so.
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    Fire, flood, fish and the uncertainty paradox
    MINNEGAL, M ; DWYER, P (Wiley-Blackwell, 2008)
    When the planet was created, the areas of the greatest biodiversity also happened to be the areas where mankind wants to reap the best reward of resources. It is not actually that complicated when you think about it, because where there is biodiversity happens to be where the resources are and it is where we happen to want to get them from. As it happened, the uranium was put in the middle of Kakadu and gold is in places where it is hard to get out. I think the creator of the universe decided to make things very interesting for environment ministers down the track. That is the reality… It is only a natural thing. (Senator Ian Campbell, Federal Minister for the Environment; Hansard 2006: 68–69)
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    Police and thieves, gunmen and drunks: Problems with men and problems with society in Papua New Guinea
    Macintyre, M (AUSTRALIAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOC, 2008-08)
    The image of the ‘man with a gun’ is pervasive in Papua New Guinea and connotes not only the state's capacity to use force, but that of men to resist and subvert state control. At the same time, the association of beer and marijuana with both modernity and violent masculine behaviours provides the context, the justification and the forms of homosocial activities involving violence. In this paper, I explore the ambiguities surrounding guns as instruments of state force and as symbols of masculine autonomy in so‐called ‘weak states’ by examining some stories about the ways that guns are acquired for illegal activities. In particular, I shall discuss the ways that guns and beer are instruments of violence and potency for police, tribal warriors and criminals as well as some of the means whereby men gain access to new forms of power. Drawing on ethnographic research with young men in New Ireland Province, the paper will deal specifically with the ways that adolescent boys construe ‘modern masculinity’.
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