School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

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    The morality of security: A theory of just securitisation
    Floyd, R ; Loader, I ; Wolfendale, J ; De Londras, F ; Roe, P ; Floyd, R (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2022-05-15)
    The purpose of this introduction is to concisely present The Morality of Security: A Theory of Just Securitization so that those unfamiliar with this work are better able to engage with the symposium. The book develops a Theory of Just Securitisation outlining when securitisation is morally permissible. Securitisation, here, refers to more than a securitising speech act coupled with a legitimising audience's tacit or actual acceptance of the threat and defence framing. Arguably the question of the morality of securitisation is most pertinent when the same encompasses the use of measures and conduct that most reasonable persons would ordinarily (that is, in times when there is no relevant threat) consider unacceptable, largely because of the harm and/or the violence risked or entailed.
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    Teaching Policy Design: Themes, Topics & Techniques
    Bali, AS ; Bakir, C ; Howlett, M ; Lewis, JM ; Schmidt, S (Editora Blucher, 2021-12-01)
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    Development of the Suicide Ideation Attributes Scale-Modified (SIDAS-M) for autistic adults
    Hedley, D ; Batterham, P ; Gallagher, E ; Denney, K ; Hayward, S ; Uljarević, M ; Bury, S ; Clapperton, A ; Robinson, J ; Trollor, J ; Stokes, M (INSAR, 2021)
    There are currently few instruments specifically designed or adapted to assess suicide risk in the autistic population. The Suicidal Ideation Attributes Scale (SIDAS) is a 5-item assessment of suicidal ideation that is commonly used and well-validated in suicide research. Unlike other instruments that primarily assess past suicidal behavior (e.g., Suicide Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised; SBQ-R), SIDAS focuses on recent (4-week) ideation making it useful for identifying current risk. SIDAS demonstrates a single factor, good internal consistency, and convergent validity. In addition to strong psychometric properties, its clear questions and straightforward design make it a strong candidate for suicide risk assessment in the autistic population. Therefore, we followed current gold-standard recommendations for measurement development and modification, as well as coproduction with autistic people, to derive and validate a modified version of the instrument (SIDAS-M) specifically adapted for use with autistic adults with a diverse range of abilities.
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    Post-Symposium Reflections: A Panel Discussion
    Polaschek, D ; Daffern, M ; Day, A ; Tamatea, A ; Tamatea, A (University of Waikato, 2021-06)
    A panel discussion to share and discuss reflections.
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    The Economic Cost of Child and Adolescent Bullying in Australia
    Jadambaa, A ; Brain, D ; Pacella, R ; Thomas, HJ ; McCarthy, M ; Scott, JG ; Graves, N (ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2021-02-22)
    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis and estimate the economic costs attributable to child and adolescent bullying victimization in Australia. METHOD: The costs of bullying victimization were measured from a societal perspective that accounted for costs associated with health care, education resources, and productivity losses. A prevalence-based approach was used to estimate the annual costs for Australians who experienced bullying victimization in childhood and adolescence. This study updated a previous systematic review summarizing the association between bullying victimization and health and nonhealth outcomes. Costs were estimated by calculating population attributable fractions to determine the effects of bullying victimization on increased risk of adverse health outcomes, such as anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, intentional self-harm, and tobacco use. A top-down approach to cost estimation was taken for all outcomes of interest except for costs incurred by educational institutions and productivity losses of victims' caregivers, for which a bottom-up cost estimation was applied. RESULTS: Annual costs in Australian dollars (AUD) in 2016 on health and nonhealth outcomes attributable to child and adolescent bullying victimization were estimated at AUD $763 million: AUD $750 million for health system costs with AUD $147 million for anxiety disorders, AUD $322 million for depressive disorders, AUD $57 million for intentional self-harm, and AUD $224 million for tobacco use; AUD $7.5 million for productivity losses of victims' caregivers; and AUD $6 million for educational services. CONCLUSION: The findings from this study suggest a substantial annual cost to Australian society as a result of bullying victimization with more than 8% of annual mental health expenditure in Australia estimated to be attributable to bullying victimization.
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    Framing Unpacked: A Semi-Supervised Interpretable Multi-View Model of Media Frames
    Khanehzar, S ; Cohn, T ; Mikolajczak, G ; Turpin, A ; Frermann, L (Association for Computational Linguistics, 2021-01-01)