School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

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    Who Is the Subject of Queer Criminology? Unravelling the Category of the Paedophile
    McDonald, D ; Dwyer, A ; Ball, M ; Crofts, T (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016)
    In the foreword to a recent special edition of Critical Criminology, Ball, Buist, and Woods write that queer criminology ‘can speak to a number of people and communities. It can take us down multiple paths, and it can remain an open space of intellectual and political contestation’ (2014: 4). Using this observation as a starting point, this chapter examines the subject to which queer criminology speaks. As this book attests, queer criminology is a comparatively new orientation. While criminology has addressed issues of sexual difference, it has generally posited a particular kind of ‘queer’ subject — predominantly those who identify as gay, lesbian, and more recently bisexual or trans. Compounding this shortcoming are the scenarios in which sexual difference has traditionally been interrogated. For example, victimisation has overwhelmingly been preoccupied with prejudice-motivated crime and interpersonal violence. On the other hand, research examining scenarios of queer criminality have typically pivoted around sexual deviance and sex work. Peterson and Panfil insightfully observe that the consequence of this tradition has been to produce a narrow frame of sexed and gendered difference within criminological scholarship (2014: 3)
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    Canada, Australia and New Zealand and the Islamic State
    Conduit, D ; Malet, D ; West, L ; Covarrubias, J ; Lansford, T ; Pauly, RJ (ROUTLEDGE, 2016-01-01)
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    Charting a new course? Testing Rouhani's foreign policy agency in the Iran-Syria relationship
    Akbarzadeh, S ; Conduit, D ; Akbarzadeh, S ; Conduit, D (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016-04-08)
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    Moving towards Ecological Regulation: The Role of Criminalisation
    Haines, F ; Parker, C ; Holley, C ; Shearing, C (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2017)
    Contemporary society faces multiple and interacting environmental challenges that require transformational change in the conduct of business. We take one of these challenges, the need to combat anthropogenic climate change, to interrogate what is required in transforming business regulation towards what we term ‘ecological regulation’. This transition requires us to grapple with how business regulation is currently framed and how change will effect such regulation. Regulation is largely premised both on the benefits of economic competition and for the control of particular harms to take place in an discrete case-by-case manner. Current moral and legal strategies used by activists in attempting to engender a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by business interact with current forms of regulation in distinct ways. The former involves activists staking a moral case for criminalisation of ecological damage through naming and shaming strategies. This may shift the moral boundaries of acceptable business behaviour. The latter is achieved by ‘bracing’ greenhouse gas reduction with existing business regulation that can bring some legal accountability to bear. We show how these strategies begin to reframe regulatory regimes as well as what ecological regulation might look like if full legal authority in enshrining a respect for ecological limits were added the contemporary framing of business regulation.
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    Regulation and risk
    Haines, F ; Drahos, P (ANU Press, 2017)
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    Global political justice
    MACDONALD, T ; Held, D ; Maffettone, P (Wiley, 2016)
    Scholarly debate on the subject of global justice has been overwhelmingly focused so far on the socio-economic aspects of justice. Much less attention has been given to those political aspects of global justice concerned with arrangements for public decision-making and the collective exercise and control of power. This gap is not adequately filled by literatures on global democracy, either, since these do not incorporate sufficient analysis of whether the democratic institutions that deliver political justice within states can achieve the same result when dealing with the very different forms of power and political agency that structure the domain of global politics. This collection brings together scholars from across the disciplines of political theory, normative ethics, and International Relations to undertake a fresh examination of some fundamental theoretical questions about the nature and significance of global political justice. Contributors tackle several dimensions of this complex theoretical topic, exploring questions about: the relationship of global political justice to other normative standards like ‘legitimacy’,‘democracy’, and ‘socio-economic’justice; the nature of global ‘public power’and the prospects for global political community; the justice and continued significance of traditional ordering principles of sovereignty and territoriality; and the relevance of standards of political justice (like political equality) to the regulation of international violence and principles of just war. This book was originally published as a special issue of Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.
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    Antipower, Agency, and the Republican Case for Global Institutional Pluralism
    MACDONALD, T ; Buckinx, B ; Trejo-Mathys, J ; Waligore, T (Routledge, 2015)
    One notable contribution made by recent work in republican theory has been its push to shift the focus of normative political analysis away from the structure of institutions that distribute social goods , and towards the structure of power relationships among individuals and groups within a social order. The republican political ideal prescribes combating power within social relationships that takes a particular pernicious form-generally called “arbitrary,” or “alien”—in which control is exercised by one actor over another without appropriate political endorsement or contestability. 1 This focus on power within republican theory equips it well to contribute to contemporary debates about institution-building in the global domain, where dynamics of power relationships are prominent features of the political landscape.
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    Corporations and global justice: Rethinking ‘public’ and ‘private’ responsibilities
    Macdonald, T ; MacDonald, K ; Marshall, S (Routledge, 2013-01-01)
    This chapter argues that corporate accountability rather than corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategies are more suitable for the inclusion of homeworkers in organizing, policy and ethical supply chain regulation issues. It also argues that the collective organization of homeworkers, and community-union alliances combined with corporate accountability features legislative and voluntary mechanisms to regulate the supply chain increase the likelihood of codes being relevant to informal and formal workers. The chapter begins with a discussion of homework in the global context, and examines informal employment, and contrasts CSR to the emergent theme of corporate accountability. It includes a detailed case study of the FairWear campaign, an example of an Australian community-union campaign with links to grassroots organizing through the campaign partners Textile, Clothing and Footwear Union of Australia (TCFUA) and Asian Women at Work (AWATW). The chapter focuses on the Australian homework context and the FairWear campaigns role in promoting homeworker rights through campaigns to maintain legal protection and supply-chain regulation.
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    Fear of witchery and the mental illness scapegoat: A discourse of an intersection between mental health and spirituality in ghana
    Mabefam, MG ; Holmes, T ; Cherniack, EP (Nova Science Publishers, 2017-01-01)
    Belief and accusations of witchcraft are common phenomena in Africa. In Ghana, almost everyone can be said to either believe in witchcraft, or to live in fear of becoming a victim of its malevolent powers or being accused as a perpetrator. In the midst of these fears, individuals are inclined to blame their unexplainable misfortunes on bayifo. (witches/wizards). Although identifying a witch or wizard is a complex, if not impossible task, certain individuals either voluntarily or under compulsion from others admit that they possess the spirit of witchcraft. This chapter examines two recent cases where individuals admitted of being witches in parts of Accra, Ghana’s capital. They confessed publically that they were witches, and claimed to have on several occasions acted maliciously to people they were jealous of or bitter towards. Both individuals were previously diagnosed with a mental illness, although their status as mental health patients was not brought into the open prior to the confessions. The chapter therefore juxtaposes the mental health status of these two individuals, and their confessions as witches. Based on this juxtaposition, the author explores how many members of Ghanaian society perceive or treat people who coincidentally fall into the category of being diagnosed with mental illness, while also being described as witches. The research findings presented in this chapter may usefully help to inform mental health policy and practice in Ghana, and shed light on Ghanaian witchcraft discourses.
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    Taking Responsibility for Climate Change
    Eckersley, RW (Melbourne University Press, 2012)