School of Social and Political Sciences - Research Publications

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    A matter of time? Institutional timescapes and gendered inequalities in the transition from education to employment in Australia
    Craig, L ; Ravn, S ; Churchill, B ; Valenzuela, MR (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2022-11-15)
    This article explores why women miss out in the transition from the educational system to the labour market. Using nationally representative longitudinal data (2001–18) from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, we compare how long after graduation it takes men and women with tertiary qualifications (n = 2030) to achieve key labour market milestones: (1) getting a full-time job; (2) getting a permanent contract; (3) earning an average wage; (4) finding a job that matches their skill level. We find significant gender differences in reaching these milestones, confirming that time is a critical dimension for understanding gendered inequalities in the returns to education. We attribute findings to incompatible ‘timescapes’ across the institutions of education, family and employment. The more flexible timescape of education allows women to succeed, but the inflexible timescape of employment (particularly when combined with family responsibilities) impedes them from turning educational achievement into labour market progress.
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    Does Third-Party Fact-Checking Increase Trust in News Stories? An Australian Case Study Using the "Sports Rorts" Affair
    Carson, A ; Gibbons, A ; Martin, A ; Phillips, JB (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2022-01-27)
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    Factors influencing the development and implementation of national greenhouse gas inventory methodologies
    Yona, L ; Cashore, B ; Bradford, MA (TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2022-01-04)
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    Two logics of participation in policy design
    Saguin, K ; Cashore, B (Informa UK Limited, 2022-01-01)
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    Social media use among bisexuals and pansexuals: connection, harassment and mental health
    Nelson, R ; Robards, B ; Churchill, B ; Vivienne, S ; Byron, P ; Hanckel, B (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2022-06-20)
    Analysing survey data from 1,304 LGBTQ + young people in Australia collected in 2016, this paper considers key distinctions between the experiences of bisexual and pansexual participants, and lesbian and gay participants in relation to social media use and aspects of connection, harassment and mental health. Presenting quantitative data, illustrated by qualitative extracts, we found broad similarities in motivations for using social media and how participants connected to peers and communities. There were some statistically significant differences, however, in respondents' motivations for using social media and who they connected with on these platforms. Importantly, bisexual and pansexual participants reported more negative experiences of harassment and exclusion across all major social media platforms when compared to their lesbian and gay peers. Bisexual and pansexual respondents also reported poorer mental health experiences. These findings speak to the different impacts of discrimination and oppression that young people experience in everyday life. There is a need for focused attention on bisexual and pansexual young people in academic, policy and youth-work domains. Young people will benefit from more substantial school-based education on LGBTQ + identities - beyond the experiences of gay and lesbian people - to 'usualise' varieties of difference in gender and sexual identity.
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    Masculinities and Disengagement from Jihadi Networks: The Case of Indonesian Militant Islamists
    Duriesmith, D ; Ismail, NH (TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC, 2022-02-08)
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    Gendered mundanities: gender bias in student evaluations of teaching in political science
    Gelber, K ; Brennan, K ; Duriesmith, D ; Fenton, E (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2022-02-26)
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    Fixes and Flux: Frontier Brokers, Political Settlements and Post-War Politics in Nepal and Sri Lanka
    Goodhand, J ; Walton, O (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2022-06-21)
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    The historicist objection to historical criminology
    Catello, R (PubPub, 2022)
    A central question surrounding the historical study of crime today concerns whether studying crime historically has a valuable contribution to make to the reform of criminal justice in the present or whether its scope should remain limited to providing a more satisfactory understanding of past crime-related phenomena. This paper problematises such a question by critically discussing the relationship between the history of crime and criminal justice policy. While it seems intuitive to suggest that historical works in criminology can positively effect change in the field of criminal justice, the historical study of crime, punishment and criminal justice presents historical criminologists with a key methodological challenge that has not yet received sufficient scrutiny by historical criminologists; that of overcoming historicism. The paper starts by showing that the dominant influence of historicism on Western historiography up until the middle of the twentieth century prevented the flourishing of historical works in criminology. It then suggests that, in the second half of the twentieth century, a number of historical works on crime started to move away from the historicist conception of history as spectator theory of the past thanks to the popularisation of present-centred historiographies such as Foucault’s history of the present. Lastly, the paper reviews some recent writings at the intersection of history and criminology to show that overcoming historicism in the historical study of crime is possible but also that there are limits to history’s capacity to contribute to present-day debates about topics of criminological relevance.
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    Ethical moments and institutional expertise in UK Government COVID-19 pandemic policy responses: where, when and how is ethical advice sought?
    Pykett, J ; Ball, S ; Dingwall, R ; Lepenies, R ; Sommer, T ; Strassheim, H ; Wenzel, L (Bristol University Press, 2022-09-19)
    Background: The emergency response to the COVID-19 pandemic has required a rapid acceleration of policy decision making, and raised a wide range of ethical issues worldwide, ranging from vaccine prioritisation, welfare and public health ‘trade-offs’, inequalities in policy impacts, and the legitimacy of scientific expertise. Aims and objectives: This paper explores the legacy of the pandemic for future science-advice-policy relationships by investigating how the UK government’s engagement with ethical advice is organised institutionally. We provide an analysis of some key ethical moments in the UK Government response to the pandemic, and institutions and national frameworks which exist to provide ethical advice on policy strategies. Methods: We draw on literature review, documentary analysis of scientific advisory group reports, and a stakeholder workshop with government ethics advisors and researchers in England. Findings: We identify how particular types of ethical advice and expertise are sought to support decision making. Contrary to a prominent assumption in the extensive literature on ‘governing by expertise’, ethical decisions in times of crisis are highly contingent. Discussion and conclusions: The paper raises an important set of questions for how best to equip policymakers to navigate decisions about values in situations characterised by knowledge deficits, complexity and uncertainty. We conclude that a clearer pathway is needed between advisory institutions and decision makers to ensure ethically-informed debate.