School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 33
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Editorial: Urban soil formation, properties, classification, management, and function
    Scharenbroch, BC ; Trammell, TL ; Paltseva, A ; Livesley, SJ ; Edmondson, J (FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2022-08-19)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Tree water-use strategies to improve stormwater retention performance of biofiltration systems
    Szota, C ; McCarthy, MJ ; Sanders, GJ ; Farrell, C ; Fletcher, TD ; Arndt, SK ; Livesley, SJ (PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2018-11-01)
    Biofiltration systems are highly valued in urban landscapes as they remove pollutants from stormwater runoff whilst contributing to a reduction in runoff volumes. Integrating trees in biofilters may improve their runoff retention performance, as trees have greater transpiration than commonly used sedge or herb species. High transpiration rates will rapidly deplete retained water, creating storage capacity prior to the next runoff event. However, a tree with high transpiration rates in a biofilter system will likely be frequently exposed to drought stress. Selecting appropriate tree species therefore requires an understanding of how different trees use water and how they respond to substrate drying. We selected 20 tree species and quantified evapotranspiration (ET) and drought stress (leaf water potential; Ψ) in relation to substrate water content. To compare species, we developed metrics which describe: (i) maximum rates of ET under well-watered conditions, (ii) the sensitivity of ET and (iii) the response of Ψ to declining substrate water content. Using these three metrics, we classified species into three groups: risky, balanced or conservative. Risky and balanced species showed high maximum ET, whereas conservative species always had low ET. As substrates dried, the balanced species down-regulated ET to delay the onset of drought stress; whereas risky species did not. Therefore, balanced species with high ET are more likely to improve the retention performance of biofiltration systems without introducing significant drought risk. This classification of tree water use strategies can be easily integrated into water balance models and improve tree species selection for biofiltration systems.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Variation in leaf area density drives the rainfall storage capacity of individual urban tree species
    Baptista, MD ; Livesley, SJ ; Parmehr, EG ; Neave, M ; Amati, M (WILEY, 2018-12-15)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    A global comparison of the climatic niches of urban and native tree populations
    Kendal, D ; Dobbs, C ; Gallagher, RV ; Beaumont, LJ ; Baumann, J ; Williams, NSG ; Livesley, SJ (WILEY, 2018-05-01)
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    How Urban Forest Managers Evaluate Management and Governance Challenges in Their Decision-Making
    Ordonez, C ; Kendal, D ; Threlfall, CG ; Hochuli, DF ; Davern, M ; Fuller, RA ; van der Ree, R ; Livesley, SJ (MDPI, 2020-09-01)
    Decisions about urban forests are critical to urban liveability and resilience. This study aimed to evaluate the range of positions held by urban forest managers from local governments in the state of Victoria, Australia, regarding the management and governance challenges that affect their decision-making. This study was based on a Q-method approach, a procedure that allows researchers to evaluate the range of positions that exist about a topic in a structured manner based on the experiences of a wide group of people. We created statements on a wide range of urban forest management and governance challenges and asked urban forest managers to rate their level of agreement with these statements via an online survey. Managers generally agreed about the challenges posed by urban development and climate change for implementing local government policies on urban forest protection and expansion. However, there were divergent views about how effective solutions based on increasing operational capacities, such as increasing budgets and personnel, could address these challenges. For some managers, it was more effective to improve critical governance challenges, such as inter-departmental and inter-municipal coordination, community engagement, and addressing the culture of risk aversion in local governments. Urban forest regional strategies aimed at coordinating management and governance issues across cities should build on existing consensus on development and environmental threats and address critical management and governance issues not solely related to local government operational capacity.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Water Smart Cities Increase Irrigation to Provide Cool Refuge in a Climate Crisis
    Livesley, SJ ; Marchionni, V ; Cheung, PK ; Daly, E ; Pataki, DE (AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 2021-01-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Conserving herbivorous and predatory insects in urban green spaces
    Mata, L ; Threlfall, CG ; Williams, NSG ; Hahs, AK ; Malipatil, M ; Stork, NE ; Livesley, SJ (NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2017-01-19)
    Insects are key components of urban ecological networks and are greatly impacted by anthropogenic activities. Yet, few studies have examined how insect functional groups respond to changes to urban vegetation associated with different management actions. We investigated the response of herbivorous and predatory heteropteran bugs to differences in vegetation structure and diversity in golf courses, gardens and parks. We assessed how the species richness of these groups varied amongst green space types, and the effect of vegetation volume and plant diversity on trophic- and species-specific occupancy. We found that golf courses sustain higher species richness of herbivores and predators than parks and gardens. At the trophic- and species-specific levels, herbivores and predators show strong positive responses to vegetation volume. The effect of plant diversity, however, is distinctly species-specific, with species showing both positive and negative responses. Our findings further suggest that high occupancy of bugs is obtained in green spaces with specific combinations of vegetation structure and diversity. The challenge for managers is to boost green space conservation value through actions promoting synergistic combinations of vegetation structure and diversity. Tackling this conservation challenge could provide enormous benefits for other elements of urban ecological networks and people that live in cities.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Global review of incentive schemes for the retention and successful establishment of trees on private urban land – Expert Opinions and Case Study Synthesis
    Ordonez Barona, C ; Bush, J ; Hurley, J ; Livesley, S ; Amati, M ; English, A ; Caffin, M ; Franks, S ; Hertzog, K ; Callow, D (Horticulture Innovation Australia (HIA), The University of Melbourne, 2020)
    This project has been funded by Hort Innovation, using the nursery research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. Hort Innovation is the grower-owned, not-for-profit research and development corporation for Australian horticulture.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Global review of incentive schemes for the retention and successful establishment of trees on private urban land: Literature Review - Interim report
    Ordonez Barona, C ; Bush, J ; Livesley, S ; Amati, M ; Hurley, J ; English, A ; Callow, D ; Hertzog, K ; Caffin, M ; Franks, S (Horticulture Innovation Australia (HIA), The University of Melbourne, 2019)
    This project has been funded by Hort Innovation, using the nursery research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. Hort Innovation is the grower-owned, not-for-profit research and development corporation for Australian horticulture.