Social Work - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 99
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Thriving After Disaster: A new way to think about support programs for kids
    Gibbs, L ; Block, K ; MacDougall, C ; Richardson, J ; Pirrone, A ; Harms, L (Natural Hazards Center, 2019)
    Commissioned report based on our our team's program of work in disaster recovery research. This report draws together work from several projects.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Not For Me: Older Adults Choosing Not to Participate in a Social Isolation Intervention
    Waycott, J ; Vetere, F ; Pedell, S ; Morgans, A ; Ozanne, E ; Kulik, L (Association for Computing Machinery, 2016-05)
    This paper considers what we can learn from the experiences of people who choose not to participate in technology-based social interventions. We conducted ethnographically-informed field studies with socially isolated older adults, who used and evaluated a new iPad application designed to help build new social connections. In this paper we reflect on how the values and assumptions guiding the technological intervention were not always shared by those participating in the evaluation. Drawing on our field notes and interviews with the older adults who chose to discontinue participation, we use personas to illustrate the complexities and tensions involved in individual decisions to not participate. This analysis contributes to HCI research calling for a more critical perspective on technological interventions. We provide detailed examples highlighting the complex circumstances of our non-participants' lives, present a framework that outlines the socio-technical context of non-participation, and use our findings to promote reflective practice in HCI research that aims to address complex social issues.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Agile housing for an ageing Australia
    Newton, C ; Backhouse, S ; Aibinu, A ; Crawford, RH ; Kvan, T ; Ozanne, E ; Pert, A ; Whitzman, C ; Zuo, J ; Daniel, L ; Soebarto, V (The Architectural Science Association and The University of Adelaide, 2016)
    By 2055, Australia’s 65+ population will have doubled and, if current strategies are followed, it is likely that the housing available will be inappropriate. Today’s housing stock will still be in use yet few developers and designers are capitalising on the potential of agile housing and, more broadly, the creation of age-friendly neighbourhoods. Current changes in design and prefabrication technology, along with government initiatives for ageing at home in preference to institutional care, have the potential to transform the way we consider housing design to support changing demographics. This research considers agile housing for an ageing population from the perspectives of urban planning, design, prefabrication, sustainability, life-cycle costing and social gerontology. We highlight the need for interdisciplinary perspectives in order to consider how entrenched policy, planning, design and construction practices can be encouraged to change through advocacy, design speculation and scenario testing to deliver right-sized housing. A cradle-to-grave perspective requires the exploration of the social and practical benefits of housing in multigenerational communities. This research links to concurrent work on affordable housing solutions and the potential of an industry, government and academic partnership to present an Australian Housing Exposition, that will highlight the possibilities of a more agile housing approach.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    An online healthy relationship tool and safety decision aid for women experiencing intimate partner violence (I-DECIDE): a randomised controlled trial
    Hegarty, K ; Tarzia, L ; Valpied, J ; Murray, E ; Humphreys, C ; Taft, A ; Novy, K ; Gold, L ; Glass, N (ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019-06-01)
    BACKGROUND: Evidence for online interventions to help women experiencing intimate partner violence is scarce. We assessed whether an online interactive healthy relationship tool and safety decision aid (I-DECIDE) would increase women's self-efficacy and improve depressive symptoms compared with an intimate partner violence information website. METHODS: In this two-group pragmatic randomised controlled trial, we enrolled women who had screened positive for any form of intimate partner violence or fear of a partner in the 6 months before recruitment. Women aged 16-50 years currently residing in Australia, who had safe access to a computer and an internet connection, and who answered positively to one of the screening questions in English were eligible for inclusion. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) by computer to receive either the intervention or control website. The intervention website consisted of modules on healthy relationships, abuse and safety, and relationship priority setting, and a tailored action plan. The control website was a static intimate partner violence information website. As the initial portion of the website containing the baseline questions was identical for both groups, there was no way for women to tell which group they had been allocated to, and the research team were also masked to participant allocation until after analysis of the 12-month data. Data were collected at baseline, immediately after completion of the website, at 6 months, and 12 months. Primary outcomes were mean general self-efficacy score (immediately after website completion, and at 6 months and 12 months) and mean depression score (at 6 months and 12 months). Data analyses were done according to intention-to-treat principles, accounting for missing data, and adjusted for outcome baseline scores. This trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN 12614001306606. FINDINGS: Between Jan 16, and Aug 28, 2015, 584 patients registered for the study and were assessed for eligibility. 422 eligible participants were randomly allocated to the intervention group (227 patients) or control group (195 patients). 179 (79%) participants in the intervention group and 156 (80%) participants in the control group completed 12-month follow-up. Mean self-efficacy at 6 months and 12 months was lower for participants in the intervention group than for participants in the control group, although this did not meet the prespecified mean difference (6 months: 27·5 [SD 5·1] vs 28·1 [4·4], imputed mean difference 1·3 [95% CI 0·3 to 2·3]; 12 months: 27·8 [SD 5·4] vs 29·0 [5·0], imputed mean difference 1·6 [95% CI 0·5 to 2·7]). We found no difference between groups in depressive symptoms at 6 months or 12 months (6 months: 22·5 [SD 17·1] vs 24·2 [17·2], imputed mean difference -0·3 [95% CI -3·5 to 3·0]; 12 months: 21·9 [SD 19·3] vs 21·5 [19·3], imputed mean difference -1·9 [95% CI -5·6 to 1·7]). Qualitative findings indicated that participants found the intervention supportive and a motivation for action. INTERPRETATION: Our findings highlight the need for further research, development, and refinement of online interventions for women experiencing intimate partner violence, particularly into the duration needed for interventions. Although we detected no meaningful differences between groups, our qualitative results indicated that some women find an online tool a helpful source of motivation and support. FUNDING: Australian Research Council.
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Eat to Cheat Dementia
    Hampson, R ; Wells, Y (WILEY, 2017-06-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Oxford handbook of clinical geropsychology
    Hampson, R (WILEY, 2017-03-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Safe at home? Housing decisions for women leaving family violence
    Diemer, K ; Humphreys, C ; Crinall, K (WILEY, 2017-03-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Are audio recordings the answer? a pilot study of a communication intervention for non-English speaking patients with cancer
    Lipson-Smith, R ; Hyatt, A ; Butow, P ; Hack, TF ; Jefford, M ; Hale, S ; Hocking, A ; Sirianni, M ; Ozolins, U ; Yiu, D ; Schofield, P (WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016-10-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Interventions to improve supervised contact visits between children in out of home care and their parents: a systematic review
    Bullen, T ; Taplin, S ; McArthur, M ; Humphreys, C ; Kertesz, M (WILEY, 2017-05-01)