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    Scenario-based Quantile Connectedness of the U.S. Interbank Liquidity Risk Network
    Ando, T ; Bai, J ; Lu, L ; Vojtech, CM (Elsevier, 2024)
    We characterize the U.S. interbank liquidity risk network based on a supervisory dataset, using a scenario-based quantile network connectedness approach. In terms of methodology, we consider a quantile vector autoregressive model with unobserved heterogeneity and propose a Bayesian nuclear norm estimation method. A common factor structure is employed to deal with unobserved heterogeneity that may exhibit endogeneity within the network. Then we develop a scenario-based quantile network connectedness framework by accommodating various economic scenarios, through a scenario-based moving average expression of the model where forecast error variance decomposition under a future pre-specified scenario is derived. The methodology is used to study the quantile-dependent liquidity risk network among large U.S. bank holding companies. The estimated quantile liquidity risk network connectedness measures could be useful for bank supervision and financial stability monitoring by providing leading indicators of the system-wide liquidity risk connectedness not only at the median but also at the tails or even under a pre-specified scenario. The measures also help identify systemically important banks and vulnerable banks in the liquidity risk transmission of the U.S. banking system.
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    Tests for Jumps in Yield Spreads
    Winkelmann, L ; Yao, W (TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC, 2024-07-02)
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    Identifying changes in the distribution of income from higher-order moments with an application to Australia
    Martin, VL ; Shi, J ; Song, Y ; Yao, W (Wiley, 2024-03)
    Summary Changes in the distribution of income over time are identified based on an adjusted two‐sample version of the Neyman smooth test by using subsampling methods to approximate the sampling distribution of the test statistic when samples are not independent of each other. A range of Monte Carlo experiments show that the approach corrects for size distortions arising from dependent samples as well as generating monotonic power functions. Applying the approach to studying the distribution of income in Australia over the business cycle and the Global Financial Crisis, the empirical results highlight the importance of higher‐order moments and demonstrate that business cycles are not all alike as the relative strengths of higher‐order moments vary over phases of the cycle.
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    Psychological Entitlement and Moral Disengagement as Antecedents of Compliance with COVID-19 Workplace Safety Protocols and the Moderating Role of Moral Identity
    Sharma, V ; Eissa, G ; Newman, A ; Lester, SW ; Pandey, J (Wiley, 2023)
    In an effort to aid the reopening of workplaces and curb the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in the United States of America issued a set of guidelines for COVID-19. While the importance of these measures has been touted, studies focusing on antecedents of compliance with workplace safety guidelines, including those of COVID-19, are at a nascent stage. The current research draws on social cognitive theory to investigate the effect of psychological entitlement on adherence to COVID-19 workplace safety protocols. Specifically, the present study proposes that psychological entitlement increases one's tendency for moral disengagement, which subsequently reduces compliance with COVID-19 workplace safety protocols. Consistent with social cognitive theory, the study further proposes moral identity as a conditional moderator in mitigating the proposed relationships. The current study finds general support for the hypothesized moderated mediation model by employing multi-wave data collected from various organizations in the United States (N = 351). Theoretical and practical implications, as well as future research directions, are discussed.
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    An experience sampling study of employees’ reactions to noise in the open-plan office
    Ayoko, OB ; Ashkanasy, NM ; Li, Y ; Dorris, A ; Jehn, KA (Elsevier, 2023-01-01)
    In this experience sampling method (ESM) study, we hypothesized that negative affect would mediate the effect of office noise perceptions on employees’ withdrawal, conflict, and territorial behaviors (marking and defending territory). We collected ESM and weekly diary data from 71 Australian employees working in open-plan offices, resulting in 672 event data points. Using a multi-level analysis model, we found that perceived office noise relates positively to negative affect that, in turn, relates positively to withdrawal and task conflict at the momentary level of analysis; and territorial marking behaviors at the between-person level. We found further that office privacy also moderates the relationship between employees’ in-the-moment perceptions of office noise and in-the-moment negative affect. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our findings for theory, research, and practice; as well as noting some research limitations and pointing out the implications of our findings for office design.
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    Theorizing consumption and markets in the context of religion: A commentary section on Appau’s (2021) ‘divine economic system’
    Jafari, A ; Moufahim, M ; Rinallo, D ; Appau, S (SAGE Publications, 2023-09-01)
    This commentary section presents a dialogical discussion on Appau’s (2021) ‘Toward a divine economic system’, an article in which he explores religious exchanges in the context of a Pentecostal Church in Ghana and proposes ‘the divine economy’ as an alternative economic system to interrogate and extend scholarship on the relationship between the market and religion. In a thought-provoking conversation, four commentators (including Appau) engage in a critical discussion aimed at generating new ideas on theorizing the complex relationship between the market, consumption, and religion.
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    Researching the sacred: a conversation with Samuelson Appau, Russ Belk and Diego Rinallo
    Moufahim, M ; Rodner, V ; El Jurdi, H ; Appau, S ; Belk, R ; Rinallo, D (Emerald, 2023-04-06)
    Purpose Once the domain of theologians, sociologists and (religion) anthropologists, we have seen more recently how consumer researchers have enriched the study of spirituality and religion. Researching the sacred can be fraught with challenges, in and out of the field. Russell Belk, Samuelson Appau and Diego Rinallo address key questions, issues and conceptualisations in the scholarship on sacred consumption, contemplating the past and mapping future research avenues. A reading list is also included for those interested in joining the authors in this collective discovery of the sacred. Design/methodology/approach Contributors answered the following four questions: How has the study of sacred consumption evolved since you started researching the field? What would be the critical methodological issues that researchers need to consider when approaching the “sacred”? What are some of the key authors that have influenced your thinking? What do you think will be the key questions that researchers will need to focus on? Findings Rinallo, Belk and Appau’s reflections on studying the sacred provide food for thought for both novice and weathered researchers alike. Researching the sacred both shapes and is shaped by our positionality: by our insider/outsider status, our gender and race and our cosmovisions as believers or sceptics. Researchers should be mindful and reflective of their subject positionings as they approach, enter and leave the field. Researching the sacred requires an open mind as we broaden our vision of what constitutes the sacred. Such research calls for scholarly as well as phenomenological curiosity. Reading widely and across disciplines to better familiarise ourselves with our sacred context helps to craft novel and meaningful research. Originality/value This paper provides a multivocal genealogy of consumer culture work on religion and spirituality, methodological advice and reading resources for researchers.
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    The study of followers in leadership research: A systematic and critical review
    Oc, B ; Chintakananda, K ; Bashshur, MR ; Day, DV (Elsevier BV, 2023-02-01)
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    Decision frames and the social utility of negotiation outcomes
    Olekalns, M ; Smith, PL (SPRINGER, 2023-04)
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    Mitigating spatial confounding by explicitly correlating Gaussian random fields
    Marques, I ; Kneib, T ; Klein, N (Wiley, 2022-08-01)
    Abstract Spatial models are used in a variety of research areas, such as environmental sciences, epidemiology, or physics. A common phenomenon in such spatial regression models is spatial confounding. This phenomenon is observed when spatially indexed covariates modeling the mean of the response are correlated with a spatial random effect included in the model, for example, as a proxy of unobserved spatial confounders. As a result, estimates for regression coefficients of the covariates can be severely biased and interpretation of these is no longer valid. Recent literature has shown that typical solutions for reducing spatial confounding can lead to misleading and counterintuitive results. In this article, we develop a computationally efficient spatial model that explicitly correlates a Gaussian random field for the covariate of interest with the Gaussian random field in the main model equation and integrates novel prior structures to reduce spatial confounding. Starting from the univariate case, we extend our prior structure also to the case of multiple spatially confounded covariates. In simulation studies, we show that our novel model flexibly detects and reduces spatial confounding in spatial datasets, and it performs better than typically used methods such as restricted spatial regression. These results are promising for any applied researcher who wishes to interpret covariate effects in spatial regression models. As a real data illustration, we study the effect of elevation and temperature on the mean of monthly precipitation in Germany.