Medicine (RMH) - Research Publications

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    Distress and unmet needs during treatment and quality of life in early cancer survivorship: A longitudinal study of haematological cancer patients
    Oberoi, DV ; White, VM ; Seymour, JF ; Prince, HM ; Harrison, S ; Jefford, M ; Winship, I ; Hill, DJ ; Bolton, D ; Millar, J ; Doo, NW ; Kay, A ; Giles, G (WILEY, 2017-11-01)
    OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of anxiety, depression and unmet supportive care needs on future quality of life (QoL) in multiple myeloma (MM) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients. METHODS: Multiple myeloma and DLBCL patients recruited through the population-based Victorian Cancer Registry. Data were collected through two telephone interviews: (T1) on average 7 months postdiagnosis, (T2) average 8 months later. QoL was examined at T2 using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT-G) scale. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale measured anxiety and depression, and the Supportive Care Needs Survey measured unmet needs at T1. Multivariate linear regression examined associations between QoL subscales (physical, emotional, social and functional well-being and overall QoL) and T1 anxiety, depression and unmet needs. RESULTS: Except physical well-being, all other QoL subscales and overall QoL were significantly associated with T1 anxiety. All QoL subscales and overall QoL were significantly associated with T1 depression. Only patient care needs were associated with physical and social well-being and overall QoL. CONCLUSION: Anxiety, depression and patient care unmet needs during treatment are associated with diminished physical and emotional well-being in the following months. Psychological distress and unmet supportive care needs experienced during treatment should be addressed to maximise future QoL.
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    Rare disease registries: a call to action
    Lacaze, P ; Millis, N ; Fookes, M ; Zurynski, Y ; Jaffe, A ; Bellgard, M ; Winship, I ; McNeil, J ; Bittles, AH (WILEY, 2017-09-01)
    When registries collect accurate clinical data over time, they can act as fundamental support structures for patients and their families and powerful cost-effective instruments to support clinical trials and translational research to improve quality of care, quality of life and survival. Registries are critical for rare diseases (RD) with low prevalence and propensity for variation in treatment and outcomes. Rare Voices Australia is leading a call for action to the research and clinical community to prioritise RD data collection and develop an integrated RD Registry strategy for Australia. Financial, operational and governance challenges exist for establishing and maintaining RD registries. As a multidisciplinary team whose interests converge on RD, we highlight the need for the establishment of an Australian RD Registry Alliance. This 'umbrella' organisation will: (i) bring together existing RD registries across Australia; (ii) establish National RD Registry Standards to support interoperability and cohesion across registries; (iii) develop strategies to attract sustainable funding from government and other sources to maximise the utility of existing RD registries and support the development of new RD registries. The most important role for the Alliance would be to use the RD registries for translational research to address current knowledge gaps about RD and to improve the care for the over 1.4 million Australians estimated to live with RD.
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    Trends in the surgical management of stage 1 renal cell carcinoma: findings from a population-based study
    White, V ; Marco, DJT ; Bolton, D ; Davis, ID ; Jefford, M ; Hill, D ; Prince, HM ; Millar, JL ; Winship, IM ; Coory, M ; Giles, GG (WILEY, 2017-11-01)
    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the use of nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) for treatment of stage 1 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) changed between 2009 and the end of 2013 in Australia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All adult cases of RCC diagnosed in 2009, 2012 and 2013 were identified through the population-based Victorian Cancer Registry. For each identified patient, trained data-abstractors attended treating hospitals or clinician rooms to extract tumour and treatment data through medical record review. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were carried out to examine the significance of change in use of NSS over time, after adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 1 836 patients with RCC were identified. Of these, the proportion of cases with stage 1 tumours was 64% in 2009, 66% in 2012 and 69% in 2013. For T1a tumours, the proportion of patients residing in metropolitan areas receiving NSS increased from 43% in 2009 to 58% in 2012 (P < 0.05), and 69% in 2013 (P < 0.05). For patients residing in non-metropolitan areas, the proportion receiving NSS increased from 27% in 2009 to 49% in 2012, and 61% in 2013 (P < 0.01). Univariable logistic regression showed patients with moderate (odds ratio [OR] 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35-0.94) or severe comorbidities (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.33-0.99), residing in non-metropolitan areas (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.47-0.90), were less likely to be treated by NSS, while those attending high-volume hospitals (≥30 cases/year: OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.21-2.65) and those with higher socio-economic status (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.02-2.07) were more likely to be treated by NSS. In multivariable analyses, patients with T1a tumours in 2012 (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.34-2.97) and 2013 (OR 3.15, 95% CI 2.13-4.68) were more likely to be treated by NSS than those in 2009. For T1b tumours, use of NSS increased from 8% in 2009 to 20% in 2013 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: This population-based study of the management of T1 renal tumours in Australia found that the use of NSS increased over the period 2009 to 2013. Between 2009 and 2013 clinical practice for the treatment of small renal tumours in Australia has increasingly conformed to international guidelines.
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    Cohort study of Gorlin syndrome with emphasis on standardised phenotyping and quality of life assessment
    Huq, AJ ; Bogwitz, M ; Gorelik, A ; Winship, IM ; White, SM ; Trainer, AH (WILEY, 2017-06-01)
    BACKGROUND: Gorlin syndrome (nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome) is a rare genetic predisposition to basal cell carcinomas (BCC), keratocysts of the jaw and calcification of the falx cerebri among other clinical features. With the advent of sonic hedgehog inhibitors for the treatment of BCC, it is timely to establish a cohort of individuals with Gorlin syndrome and collect standardised phenotypic information on these individuals. Moreover, the health-related quality of life (QoL) in individuals with Gorlin syndrome is not well studied. AIM: To establish a Victorian cohort of Gorlin syndrome and study the QoL in these individuals. METHODS: Phenotypic data were obtained by reviewing medical records of individuals attending two major tertiary/quaternary genetic referral centres in Victoria, followed by telephone or face-to-face interviews where possible. QoL information was obtained utilising the AQoL-6D quality of life survey form. RESULTS: The median number of BCC in the 19 individuals studied was 17.5 (interquartile range 3-70). The number of patients with ≥100 BCC in this group was similar to a previously described national cohort (22.2 vs 27% respectively). A total of 58% of referrals to the genetics clinics originated from maxillofacial surgeons and 42% from dermatologists. Individuals with ≥100 BCC had worse median QoL scores compared to those with <100 BCC (36 vs 29, P-value of 0.031). CONCLUSION: The clinical features in our cohort were congruent with those previously described in Australia. The QoL is adversely correlated with increased BCC burden.
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    Multiple cutaneous leiomyomas leading to discovery of novel splice mutation in the fumarate hydratase gene associated with HLRCC
    Tan, RYP ; Walsh, M ; Howard, A ; Winship, I (WILEY, 2017-11-01)
    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is a rare autosomal dominant condition, which manifests as cutaneous leiomyomas (CL), uterine fibroids and renal cell cancer (RCC). We describe the case of a 53-year-old woman who presented with multiple CL with a novel heterozygous canonical splice site mutation in intron 9 of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene IVS 9-1 G>C (NM_000143.3:c 1391-1 G>C) that was not detected on initial screening of a mutation hotspot but was picked up on sequencing the remaining exons and splice site junctions. This report highlights the importance of clinical suspicion in the diagnosis of HLRCC in the absence of a family or personal history of cancer and despite initial genetic testing being negative.
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    The role of STK 11 gene testing in individuals with oral pigmentation
    Bich-Thu, D ; Winship, I (WILEY, 2017-05-01)
    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare, autosomal dominant condition characterised by mucocutaneous pigmented lesions, gastrointestinal polyposis and a significant risk of cancer. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS) is a benign condition with similar dermatological features, but with no systemic complications. STK 11 gene testing allows clinicians to differentiate between these two disorders. This case report compares the dermatological similarities in four individuals with PJS or LHS and illustrates the potential benefit of genetic testing. There is > 90% likelihood of identifying a mutation in STK 11 if a patient fulfils the diagnostic criteria for PJS. Lifelong risk management is advised for these individuals with confirmed PJS. Diagnostic confirmation is important to provide rational management, in particular, endoscopic cancer surveillance, and psychological support. STK 11 testing can confirm those at risk of PJS, who require lifelong surveillance, and possibly release those with a simple dermatosis, such as LHS, from invasive and thus potentially harmful surveillance.
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    Genetic mosaicism in dermatology: Clinical utility of genetic testing of skin lesions
    Doolan, BJ ; Robinson, AJ ; Regan, M ; Ragunathan, A ; Winship, I (WILEY, 2019-08-28)
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    Warfarin ineffective as symptomatic therapy for erythropoietic protoporphyria
    Doolan, BJ ; Vu, M ; Varigos, GA ; Hogan, C ; Ross, G ; Sood, S ; Winship, I (WILEY, 2019-11-01)
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