Melbourne Business School - Research Publications

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    Income contingent loans for low-income households
    GANS, J. ; KING, S. (RoutledgeFalmer, 2006)
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    PATENT LENGTH AND THE TIMING OF INNOVATIVE ACTIVITY
    GANS, JS ; KING, SP (Wiley, 2007-12)
    The standard result in patent policy, as demonstrated by Gilbert and Shapiro (1990), is that infinitely lived but very narrow patents are optimal as deadweight losses are minimised and spread through time but inventors can still recover their R&D expenditures. By extending their innovative environment to include timing as an important choice, we demonstrate that a finitely lived, but broader, patent can be socially desirable. This is because a patent breadth is a better instrument than length to encourage socially optimal timing. Thus, patents need not be infinitely long in order to encourage a greater number of inventions
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    Paying for loyalty: Product bundling in oligopoly
    Gans, JS ; King, SP (BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, 2006-03)
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    Access holidays and the timing of infrastructure investment
    Gans, JS ; King, SP (ECONOMIC SOC OF AUSTRALIA BROWN PRIOR ANDERSON PTY LTD, 2004-03)
    For risky infrastructure investment, ‘regulatory truncation’ can diminish investment incentives. We model the truncation problem, showing the link to regulatory commitment, and derive optimal state‐contingent access prices. If regulators cannot commit ex ante to specific ex post access prices then a regulatory commitment to a fixed period free of access – an access holiday – can improve investment incentives. We establish conditions under which an access holiday may improve investment timing and show how an optimal holiday depends on the underlying profit flows from the investment. In particular, we show that an optimal holiday may leave investors with positive expected economic profits.