Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 15
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    The Blind Assessor: Are We Constraining or Enriching Diversity of Development and Learning
    Farrell, H ; BROPHY, T ; Lai, M-L ; Chen, H-F (GIA Publications, 2014)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Imagining Social Equity
    Farrell, H ; Gordon, M (IGI Global, 2016)
    In my view, work in special and inclusive education, and early childhood special education intervention is challenging and exciting. The children and young people (and adults) with complex special needs have become the shared responsibility of both educators and many other allied health professionals in recent years. The unique patterns of special education service delivery to these children and young people require work in interdisciplinary teams. The mission and concern of the chapter offers the interdisciplinary community in the education sector including teachers, academics, graduate students, policy makers, researchers, non-governmental organisations, government officials, school boards, medical and paramedical professionals, and advocacy groups the opportunity to work together to explore what notions of social equity mean, and to investigate ways of ameliorating disadvantage in special and inclusive education, and early childhood special education intervention sectors.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Psychological skills to support performance under pressure.
    OSBORNE, MS ; Mornell, A (Peter Lang, 2016)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Intergroup metaphors
    Holland, E ; Stratemeyer, M ; HASLAM, N ; Giles, H ; Maass, A (Peter Lang, 2016)
    Intergroup metaphors represent human groups as nonhuman entities, such as animals, objects, plants, or forces of nature. These metaphors are abundant, diverse in meanings, and frequently but not invariably derogatory. Intergroup metaphors may be explicitly represented in language or implicitly represented as nonconscious mental associations. Research and theory on dehumanization offer a useful perspective on these metaphors, and show that likening outgroups to animals is a particularly common phenomenon. Frequently, groups are metaphorically compared to disgusting or degrading animals during times of conflict, but people also tend to view members of outgroups as subtly more animal-like or primitive than their own group even in the absence of conflict. Depending on the use of intergroup metaphors in the contexts of race, gender, social class, immigration, mental illness, and terrorism, intergroup metaphors can have damaging consequences for intergroup relations. Metaphors that represent some people as subhuman entities can diminish empathy and compassion for their suffering. Metaphors that represent certain groups as bestial or diabolical can enable violence, including support for harsh treatment by the state. Some metaphors not only promote violence and discrimination but also help people to legitimize violent behavior and injustice after the fact. Metaphors therefore offer an intriguing insight into the nature of intergroup relations, and how these relations are colored not only by positive or negative attitudes but also by dehumanizing perceptions.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    The role of epilepsy surgery
    WILSON, S ; Rayner, G ; Mula, M (Springer, 2016)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    The frontal cortex
    JOHNSON, K ; Rinehart, N ; Bradshaw, JL ; Enticott, P (Psychology Press, 2016-10-14)
    Developmental Disorders of the Brain: Brain and Behaviour addresses disabilities that occur or have their roots in the early, developmental phase of life which are of utmost concern to parents, siblings, carers and teachers. This text describes the latest clinical and behavioral findings of disorders which largely or entirely involve the frontostriatal (basal ganglia) system including Tourette’s, Obsessive-Compulsive and Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity disorders, Schizophrenia, Autism, gambling and addiction, depression, and Conduct, Developmental Motor Co-ordination, and language disorders. Examples of disorders involving the frontocerebellar are also described such as Asperger’s disorder, Williams, Fragile X, and Cerebellar Cognitive Affective syndromes, and Friedreich Ataxia. This book also discusses the relevant anatomy, physiology and pathology, and some of the major functions mediated by affected or relevant structures, together with accounts of the latest recording, brain imaging and stimulating techniques related to these kinds of disorders. Covering both frontostriatal and frontocerebellar, systems which control and direct normal behavior, and which can fail with often distressing consequences during development, as well as addressing behavioural, clinical, pathophysiological and technical aspects, this text is vital to understanding, diagnosis and management of developmental disorders of the brain. This text will be of great interest to clinicians, researchers, teachers and parents. .
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    The basal ganglia
    JOHNSON, K ; Rinehart, N ; Bradshaw, JL ; Enticott, P (Psychology Press, 2016-10-14)
    This chapter reviews the anatomy, connectivity, and the biochemistry of the basal ganglia (BG). It presents some of the models of the way the BG connect with the rest of the brain and how the BG nuclei function together. The basal ganglia are a set of interconnected nuclei located in the base of the forebrain. They consist of the ventral striatum, the dorsal striatum, the globus pallidus – both the internal (GPi) and external (GPe) sections, the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), and the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Anatomical and physiological research supports the contention that the BG are part of a series of separate but parallel circuits that funnel projections from broad sections of the cortex into discrete sections of the BG and then back to even more discrete sections of the cortex. The BG is a complex system of subcortical nuclei involved in the control of movement, cognition, and motivation.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Morality and Humanness
    Haslam, N ; Bastian, B ; Loughnan, S ; Levine, JM ; Hogg, MA (Sage, 2010)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Immigration, Multiculturalism and the Changing Face of Australia
    Bastian, B ; Bretherton, D ; Balvin, N (SPRINGER, 2012)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    A Perspective on Dehumanization
    Haslam, N ; Bain, P ; Bastian, B ; Loughnan, S ; Drogosz, M ; Bilewicz, M (PWN, 2012)