Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences - Research Publications

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    Socioeconomic Differences in the Effectiveness of the Removal of the "Light" Descriptor on Cigarette Packs: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Thailand Survey
    Siahpush, M ; Borland, R ; Fong, GT ; Elton-Marshall, T ; Yong, H-H ; Holumyong, C (MDPI, 2011-06)
    Many smokers incorrectly believe that "light" cigarettes are less harmful than regular cigarettes. To address this problem, many countries have banned "light" or "mild" brand descriptors on cigarette packs. Our objective was to assess whether beliefs about "light" cigarettes changed following the 2007 removal of these brand descriptors in Thailand and, if a change occurred, the extent to which it differed by socioeconomic status. Data were from waves 2 (2006), 3 (2008), and 4 (2009) of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Thailand Survey of adult smokers in Thailand. The results showed that, following the introduction of the ban, there was an overall decline in the two beliefs that "light" cigarettes are less harmful and smoother than regular cigarettes. The decline in the "less harmful" belief was considerably steeper in lower income and education groups. However, there was no evidence that the rate of decline in the "smoother" belief varied by income or education. Removing the "light" brand descriptor from cigarette packs should thus be viewed not only as a means to address the problem of smokers' incorrect beliefs about "light" cigarettes, but also as a factor that can potentially reduce socioeconomic disparities in smoking-related misconceptions.
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    Short-term and long-term stability in electronic communication networks
    Quintane, E ; Pattison, PE ; Robins, GL ; Mol, JM (Academy of Management, 2013-01-01)
    Network researchers typically focus on patterns of stable relationships, where stability represents the unfolding of social processes over long time frames. By contrast, we argue and empirically demonstrate that social interactions exhibit regularities across different time frames (short and long-term), reflecting distinct social processes.
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    f2MOVE: fMRI-compatible haptic object manipulation system for closed-loop motor control studies
    Sylaidi, A ; Lourenco, P ; Nageshwaran, S ; Lin, C-H ; Rodriguez, M ; Festenstein, R ; Faisal, AA (IEEE, 2015-04)
    Functional neuroimaging plays a key role in addressing open questions in systems and motor neuroscience directly applicable to brain machine interfaces. Building on our low-cost motion capture technology (fMOVE), we developed f2MOVE, an fMRI-compatible system for 6DOF goal-directed hand and wrist movements of human subjects enabling closed-loop sensorimotor haptic experiments with simultaneous neuroimaging. f2MOVE uses a high-zoom lens high frame rate camera and a motion tracking algorithm that tracks in real-time the position of special markers attached to a hand-held object in a novel customized haptic interface. The system operates with high update rate (120 Hz) and sufficiently low time delays (<; 20 ms) to enable visual feedback while complex, goal-oriented movements are recorded. We present here both the accuracy of our motion tracking against a reference signal and the efficacy of the system to evoke motor control specific brain activations in healthy subjects. Our technology and approach thus support the real-time, closed-loop study of the neural foundations of complex haptic motor tasks using neuroimaging.
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    Conceptual event units of putting and taking in two unrelated languages
    DEFINA, R ; Majid, A ; Miyake, N ; Peebles, D ; Cooper, R (Cognitive Science Society, 2012)
    People automatically chunk ongoing dynamic events into discrete units. This paper investigates whether linguistic structure is a factor in this process. We test the claim that describing an event with a serial verb construction will influence a speaker’s conceptual event structure. The grammar of Avatime (a Kwa language spoken in Ghana) requires its speakers to describe some, but not all, placement events using a serial verb construction which also encodes the preceding taking event. We tested Avatime and English speakers’ recognition memory for putting and taking events. Avatime speakers were more likely to falsely recognize putting and taking events from episodes associated with takeput serial verb constructions than from episodes associated with other constructions. English speakers showed no difference in false recognitions between episode types. This demonstrates that memory for episodes is related to the type of language used; and, moreover, across languages different conceptual representations are formed for the same physical episode, paralleling habitual linguistic practices.