Melbourne Conservatorium of Music - Research Publications

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    The development of a decision matrix to guide and support the provision of effective arts programs in schools
    McFerran, KS ; Crooke, AHD ; Steele, M ; McPherson, G ; Hattie, J (Elsevier BV, 2022-01-01)
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    Whose Voices? Whose Knowledge?
    Ikuno, 生野 里花, R ; Miyake, 三宅 博子, H ; Zambonini, JP ; Eslava-Mejia, J ; Moonga, N ; Silveira, TM ; Low, 刘明元, MY ; Ghetti, C ; Hadley, SJ (Universtity of Bergen Library, 2021-10-31)
    Members of the Voices editorial team grapple with ....
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    An Exploratory Study of Historical Representations of Love in an Art Gallery Exhibition
    Krause, AE ; Davidson, JW (EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING FOUNDATION-AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC, 2021-03-25)
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    Relationships between social interactions, basic psychological needs, and wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic
    Dimmock, J ; Krause, AE ; Rebar, A ; Ben, J (TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-04-25)
    OBJECTIVE: Social lockdowns associated with COVID-19 have led individuals to increasingly rely on video conferencing and other technology-based interactions to fulfil social needs. The extent to which these interactions, as well as traditional face-to-face interactions, satisfied psychological needs and supported wellbeing during different periods of the COVID-19 pandemic is yet to be elucidated. In this study, university students' social interactions (both technology-based and face-to-face), psychological needs, and wellbeing were assessed at six time points across four months of government-enforced restrictions in Australia. DESIGN: Repeated survey assessment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Basic psychological need satisfaction; general wellbeing. RESULTS: Results demonstrated that, at the within-subjects level, relatedness satisfaction (feeling understood by, cared for, and connected to others) significantly mediated the relationship between technology-based interaction and wellbeing. Autonomy satisfaction (self-initiation and feeling ownership over decisions and behaviours) mediated the relationship between face-to-face interactions and wellbeing at the within-person level. CONCLUSION: Discussion is centred on the importance of technology-based interactions for needs satisfaction and wellbeing during periods of social isolation.
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    Effects of Passion, Experience, and Cultural Politics on Classical Musicians' Practice During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Lopez-iniguez, G ; McPherson, GE ; Zarza Alzugaray, FJ ; Angel-Alvarado, R (FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2022-05-02)
    The widespread cancelation of cultural events during the early 2020 stages of the COVID-19 pandemic led professional performing musicians across the world to experience an increasing economic fragility that threatened their health and wellbeing. Within this "new normal," developing countries have been at a higher risk due to their vulnerable health systems and cultural policies. Even in such difficult times, the music profession requires musicians to keep up their practicing routines, even if they have no professional commitments. This is because high level technical and expressive skills are crucial to sustaining a music career at a high performance level. However, it could be expected that not all musicians might have had the same engagement with music practice during lockdowns. In this study, we studied the experiences of 309 professional classical musicians based in European and Latin American countries with different levels of performing experience to examine their passionate (or lack thereof) engagement with music practice. Through the mixed methods combination of multigroup invariance and narrative analyses, we identified distinct profiles of musicians who displayed more harmonious or more obsessive passion orientations before and at the peak of the pandemic. We observed that musicians with higher levels of harmonious passion in particular were more capable of sustaining their practice at the peak of the pandemic and that these musicians were mostly located in Latin America-a paradox, considering that cultural politics supporting the careers of professional performing musicians and entrepreneurial education in Latin America are lacking to a great extent, especially in comparison with the European context. We explain this in terms of the "forced" self-management embraced by musicians in Latin American countries who want to engage with music practice both before and during the COVID-19 pandemic even if the music profession does not generate enough revenue for them.
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    This is a Trombone: Music for trombone and piano
    Immel, D ; Cassomenos, S (Common Tone Arts, 2022)
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    Creative Arts Interventions in Addressing Depression in Older Adults: A Systematic Review
    Sajnani, N ; Dunphy, K ; Baker, F ; Dumaresq, E ; Caroll-Haskins, K ; Eickholt, J ; Ercole, M ; Kaimal, G (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2021-12-17)
    Abstract Depression experienced by older adults is proving an increasing global health burden, with rates as high as 27% in the USA. This is likely to increase in coming years as the number and proportion of older adults in the global population rises. Therefore, it is imperative that the effectiveness of approaches to the prevention and treatment of depression are understood. Creative arts interventions, including art, dance movement, drama, and music, are utilized internationally to reduce depressive symptoms in older adults and promote wellbeing. This includes interventions led by trained arts therapists as well as other health and arts professionals. This presentation will include a report of findings from a recent systematic review of the outcomes of four creative arts modalities (art, dance movement, drama, and music) with particular attention paid to processes of change documented in each modality.
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    Loneliness and Behavioral Changes During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Cudjoe, T ; Li, Q ; Drazich, B ; Hladek, M ; Samuel, L ; latkin, C ; Boyd, C (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2021-12-17)
    Abstract Concerns for the health impact of loneliness, a risk factor for morbidity and mortality, have risen amid the COVID-19 pandemic. However, relationships between loneliness and behavioral changes remains unclear. Utilizing data from the National Health and Aging Trends Study COVID-19 Supplement, we examine the cross-sectional relationship between loneliness and self-reported increase in each of the following behaviors during the pandemic (n=2,924): walking, vigorous activity, eating, use of alcohol and tobacco, watching television and sleeping. Adjusting for age, race, education, activity of daily living limitations, and chronic conditions, loneliness was significantly associated with a higher odds of more eating (odds ratio- OR: 1.42, confidence intervals-CI: 1.24,1.62), sleeping (OR: 1.35, CI: 1.18,1.56), and watching television (OR: 1.45, CI: 1.30,1.61). These results indicate that during stressful times like our current pandemic, loneliness may lead to morbidity and mortality through sedentary behaviors.
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    Editorial: The Psychological and Physiological Benefits of the Arts
    Karkou, V ; Sajnani, N ; Orkibi, H ; Groarke, JM ; Czamanski-Cohen, J ; Panero, ME ; Drake, J ; Jola, C ; Baker, FA (FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2022-03-08)