Melbourne Conservatorium of Music - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 17
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    "Telling me not to worry..." Hyperscanning and Neural Dynamics of Emotion Processing During Guided Imagery and Music
    Fachner, JC ; Maidhof, C ; Grocke, D ; Pedersen, IN ; Trondalen, G ; Tucek, G ; Bonde, LO (FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2019-07-25)
    To analyze how emotions and imagery are shared, processed and recognized in Guided Imagery and Music, we measured the brain activity of an experienced therapist ("Guide") and client ("Traveler") with dual-EEG in a real therapy session about potential death of family members. Synchronously with the EEG, the session was video-taped and then micro-analyzed. Four raters identified therapeutically important moments of interest (MOI) and no-interest (MONI) which were transcribed and annotated. Several indices of emotion- and imagery-related processing were analyzed: frontal and parietal alpha asymmetry, frontal midline theta, and occipital alpha activity. Session ratings showed overlaps across all raters, confirming the importance of these MOIs, which showed different cortical activity in visual areas compared to resting-state. MOI 1 was a pivotal moment including an important imagery with a message of hope from a close family member, while in the second MOI the Traveler sent a message to an unborn baby. Generally, results seemed to indicate that the emotions of Traveler and Guide during important moments were not positive, pleasurably or relaxed when compared to resting-state, confirming both were dealing with negative emotions and anxiety that had to be contained in the interpersonal process. However, the temporal dynamics of emotion-related markers suggested shifts in emotional valence and intensity during these important, personally meaningful moments; for example, during receiving the message of hope, an increase of frontal alpha asymmetry was observed, reflecting increased positive emotional processing. EEG source localization during the message suggested a peak activation in left middle temporal gyrus. Interestingly, peaks in emotional markers in the Guide partly paralleled the Traveler's peaks; for example, during the Guide's strong feeling of mutuality in MOI 2, the time series of frontal alpha asymmetries showed a significant cross-correlation, indicating similar emotional processing in Traveler and Guide. Investigating the moment-to-moment interaction in music therapy showed how asymmetry peaks align with the situated cognition of Traveler and Guide along the emotional contour of the music, representing the highs and lows during the therapy process. Combining dual-EEG with detailed audiovisual and qualitative data seems to be a promising approach for further research into music therapy.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Introduction
    GROCKE, D ; Moe, T (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2015-05-21)
    We use the music therapy language of Wheeler's (1983) adaptation of Wolberg's (1977) levels of therapy (Supportive, ... 354 GUIDED IMAGERY & MUSIC (GIM) AND MUSIC IMAGERY METHODS FOR INDIVIDUAL AND GROUPTHERAPY.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Receptive Music Therapy
    GROCKE, D ; Edwards, J (Oxford University Press, 2015)
    In the Oxford Handbook of Music Therapy, international leaders in the field from 10 countries have contributed their expertise to showcase contemporary music therapy.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Examining the relationship between self-reported mood management and music preferences of Australian teenagers
    McFerran, KS ; Garrido, S ; O'Grady, L ; Grocke, D ; Sawyer, SM (GRIEG ACADEMY, 2015-07-03)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Effect of Singing on Respiratory Function, Voice, and Mood After Quadriplegia: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    Tamplin, J ; Baker, FA ; Grocke, D ; Brazzale, DJ ; Pretto, JJ ; Ruehland, WR ; Buttifant, M ; Brown, DJ ; Berlowitz, DJ (W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, 2013-03-01)
    OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of singing training on respiratory function, voice, mood, and quality of life for people with quadriplegia. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Large, university-affiliated public hospital, Victoria, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Participants (N=24) with chronic quadriplegia (C4-8, American Spinal Injury Association grades A and B). INTERVENTIONS: The experimental group (n=13) received group singing training 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. The control group (n=11) received group music appreciation and relaxation for 12 weeks. Assessments were conducted pre, mid-, immediately post-, and 6-months postintervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Standard respiratory function testing, surface electromyographic activity from accessory respiratory muscles, sound pressure levels during vocal tasks, assessments of voice quality (Perceptual Voice Profile, Multidimensional Voice Profile), and Voice Handicap Index, Profile of Mood States, and Assessment of Quality of Life instruments. RESULTS: The singing group increased projected speech intensity (P=.028) and maximum phonation length (P=.007) significantly more than the control group. Trends for improvements in respiratory function, muscle strength, and recruitment were also evident for the singing group. These effects were limited by small sample sizes with large intersubject variability. Both groups demonstrated an improvement in mood (P=.002), which was maintained in the music appreciation and relaxation group after 6 months (P=.017). CONCLUSIONS: Group music therapy can have a positive effect on not only physical outcomes, but also can improve mood, energy, social participation, and quality of life for an at-risk population, such as those with quadriplegia. Specific singing therapy can augment these general improvements by improving vocal intensity.
  • Item
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Lyric analysis research in music therapy: Rationales, methods and representations
    O'Callaghan, C ; Grocke, D (PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2009-11-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Effect of Group Music Therapy on Quality of Life for Participants Living with a Severe and Enduring Mental Illness
    Grocke, D ; Bloch, S ; Castle, D (NATL ASSOC MUSIC THERAPY INC, 2009-06-01)
    A 10-week group music therapy project was designed to determine whether music therapy influenced quality of life and social anxiety for people with a severe and enduring mental illness living in the community. Ten one-hour weekly sessions including song singing, song writing and improvisation, culminated in each group recording original song/s in a professional studio. The principal outcome measure was the WHOQOLBREF Quality of Life (QoL) Scale; other instruments used were the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Qualitative data were gathered through focus group interviews and an analysis of lyric themes. Statistically significant improvement was found on five items of the QoL Scale. There were no changes on the BSI indicating that QoL improvement was not mediated by symptomatic change. Themes from the focus groups were: music therapy gave joy and pleasure, working as a team was beneficial, participants were pleasantly surprised at their creativity, and they took pride in their song. An analysis of song lyrics resulted in 6 themes: a concern for the world, peace and the environment; living with mental illness is difficult; coping with mental illness requires strength; religion and spirituality are sources of support; living in the present is healing; and working as a team is enjoyable.
  • Item