Melbourne Conservatorium of Music - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 154
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Descriptions and Evaluations of "Good Singing" in the Age of 'The Voice'
    Forbes, M ; Krause, AE ; Lowe-Brown, X (Australian National Association of Teachers of Singing Ltd, 2021)
    What constitutes “good singing” can be hotly contested amongst singing voice pedagogues, yet little is known about what the general public considers to be “good singing”. Within a program of research on musical identity and singing self-concept, this mixed-methods pilot study considered how members of the public (N = 52) described and evaluated stylistically different versions of a sung melody to test a hypothesis that reality TV singing may be deemed as “good singing”. Participants were exposed to three versions of “Happy Birthday”: 1) amateurs singing “as they would normally sing”; 2) professionals performing a “plain” version; 3) the same professionals singing an embellished version in the style of The Voice reality TV show. Results indicate that both professional versions were considered “better singing” than the amateur singing. While respondents focused on the technical deficiencies for amateurs, descriptions of the professionals concerned style. Stated exemplars of “good singing” were split between the two professional versions—based on sophistication and creativity (“professional: embellished”) or vocal quality (“professional: plain”). While respondents’ preferred version largely matched their chosen exemplar of “good singing”, participants were more likely to sing along with the “amateur” version. Implications for singing voice pedagogy and engagement in singing activities for wellbeing are considered.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Night Pieces: Reflections After COVID-19, for soprano saxophone and piano
    Kouvaras, L (Australian Music Centre, 2021-02-01)
    Night Pieces: Reflections After COVID-19 is a series of musical vignettes, meditating on the myriad experiences marking this year of global pandemic. SARS-CoV-2 has graphed new heights and depths for us all collectively and individually. My aunt was prematurely taken from us, succumbing to the disease in her aged care facility. We have all reeled at the widespread - and growing number of - deaths and suffering it has caused. The world has polarised, and come together, over associated issues to do with loss, reaction to government action, societal re-structures in day-to-day life, lockdowns, regaining of freedom, human connection, fear, grief and hope. In this work, Night Pieces: Reflections After Covid-19 for saxophone and piano, I wanted to encapsulate in musical rendering some of my own responses - insights and emotive reactions, that are made more acute during the quiet of the night - to the roller-coaster of the year 2020. The fourth movement, Elegy, is an arrangement of a movement, An Elegy, from … to enter the dream that includes all dreams, composed for SATB Choir and Piano in 2002 and also arranged as a solo song for Soprano and Piano, to highlight the connection of grief to past events of loss.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    “Can’t live without music”: Engaging and disengaging from music listening.
    Osborne, M ; Krause, A ; Glasser, S ( 2021-07-28)
    Poster presented at ICMPC-ESCOM2021, https://icmpc2021.sites.sheffield.ac.uk.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Reimagining the performance experience through the establishment of a virtual performance hall.
    Glasser, S ; Cochrane, T ; Loveridge, B ; Osborne, M ( 2021-10-27)
    Paper presented as part of the symposium "Reimagining Performance with Immersive Reality Technologies" at ISPS 2021, 27-30 October, Montreal, Canada.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Design principles for immersive reality to enhance creativity and performance through transdisciplinary collaboration.
    Osborne, M ; Cochrane, T ; Loveridge, B ; Glasser, S ( 2021-10-27)
    Paper presented as part of the symposium "Reimagining Performance with Immersive Reality Technologies" at ISPS 2021, 27-30 October, Montreal, Canada.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Reimagining music performance with immersive reality technologies.
    Loveridge, B ; Osborne, M ; Glasser, S ( 2021-11-05)
    NowNet Arts Conference 2021 Network Arts: Transformation of Distance.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Exploring opportunities for musician’s health and performance enhancement using VR simulation training.
    Glasser, S ; Osborne, M ; Loveridge, B ( 2021-10-07)
    Paper presented at Games for Change Asia-Pacific Festival 2021, 5-7 October, online conference.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    FFAM Virtual Performance Lab.
    Glasser, S ; Osborne, M ( 2021-04-23)
    Presentation given at the Scholarship of Technology Enhanced Learning conference, University of Melbourne.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Reflections on the year of change: Adaptive and creative responses to technology as Music Teachers in the tertiary setting
    Johnson, C ; Merrick, B ; de Bruin, L ( 2021-09-18)
    Asia-Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research (APSMER) Conference 2021
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Pedagogies of difference: a framework for pedagogical adaptation and creative climates
    de Bruin, L ; Randles, C (University of Southern Florida, 2021)
    Instrumental music tuition in schools is a powerful way teachers can guide students to immerse in detailed and specific aspects of learning. Regular lessons with a music teacher are a ubiquitous school activity where students engage with expert learning, practice, reflection and discourse of learning processes. This qualitative study examines teacher experiences in instrumental music education in Victoria, Australia. Investigating teacher perspectives to pedagogy that connect, engage and nurture instrumental music learning and exploration, this study of instrumental music teachers across four diverse schools in Victoria phenomenologically analysed teacher reflections on learning events with students. Analysis of interactions, pedagogies and adaptive behaviours between teacher and student revealed a dynamic social context spanning the instructional relationship between student action and teacher direction, the subject matter and substance of what is taught, and the connection between the student and the teacher as master musician. Looking beyond music teachers as adaptors that utilise generic descriptors of critical thinking, communication, creativity, and collaboration (4C’s of creativity) this study identifies and redefines the qualities of recognition, empathy, insightfulness and responsiveness outlining a (REIR) framework to which all teachers can shape pedagogical approaches that engage and educate learners in the future. Findings outline relationship-building and connective teacher-student relationships fostering multiple creativities in music learning. The study posits a recalibration of teacher practice on building positive collaborative learning climates, a relational adaptivity that emphasises effective interpersonal strategies that enhance student learning and potentially enculturate richer teacher understanding and more sophisticated musicianship in students.