Melbourne Conservatorium of Music - Research Publications

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    Improvisation, Music Education, and the Embodied Mind
    van der Schyff, D ( 2018-07-24)
    IICSI colloquium - Sounding Promise in the Present Tense, University of British Columbia, Canada - July 24th, 2018 Presentation given by Dylan van der Schyff at the 2018 IICSI colloquium "Sounding Promise in the Present Tense: Improvising Through Turbulent Times." van der Schyff discusses improvisation in relation to music education and theories of cognition.
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    Phenomenology, Technology and Arts Education: Exploring the Pedagogical Possibilities of Two Multimedia Arts Inquiry Projects
    Schyff, DVD (Inference, 2016)
    The relevance of phenomenology for arts education is explored through two multimedia arts inquiry projects. I begin by offering a brief outline of what arts inquiry and phenomenology entail. Following this, I consider a phenomenological study relevant to creative multimedia studies, and develop the relationship between phenomenology, critical pedagogy, and creative praxis in the arts. Drawing on these ideas, I then discuss the processes involved in creating the multimedia projects and consider possibilities for similar projects in educational contexts. Most importantly, I attempt to show how such projects might open arts educators and students to more reflective, imaginative and participatory ways of being-in-the-world, while simultaneously developing deeper historical, cultural, technical, and aesthetic understandings of the art forms they are engaged with.
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    From Necker Cubes to Polyrhythms: Fostering a Phenomenological Attitude in Music Education
    van der Schyff, D (UNIV ALBERTA LIBRARIES, 2016-01-01)
    Phenomenology is explored as a way of helping students and educators open up to music as a creative and transformative experience. I begin by introducing a simple exercise in experimental phenomenology involving multi-stable visual phenomena that can be explored without the use of complex terminology. Here, I discuss how the “phenomenological attitude” may foster a deeper appreciation of the structure of consciousness, as well as the central role the body plays in how we experience and form understandings of the worlds we inhabit. I then explore how the phenomenological attitude may serve as a starting point for students and teachers as they begin to reflect on their involvement with music as co-investigators. Here I draw on my teaching practice as a percussion and drum kit instructor, with a special focus on multi-stable musical phenomena (e.g., African polyrhythm). To conclude, I briefly consider how the phenomenological approach might be developed beyond the practice room to examine music’s relationship to the experience of culture, imagination and “self.”
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    Musical Empathy, from Simulation to 4E Interaction
    van der Schyff, D ; Krueger, J ; Ferreira Corrêa, A (Brazilian Association of Cognition and Musical Arts, 2019-04-01)
    The term “empathy” refers to the ability to understand or feel the experience of another person. In folk psychology, this is often thought to involve a kind of mind reading, whereby we access the thoughts and intentions of others. For example, empathy might involve inferring the logical thought processes of an individual, allowing us to see how and why they make the choices they do. This includes some awareness of that person’s history, of their beliefs and background. As such, empathy can entail complex imaginative and deductive processes where, in a sense, we place ourselves in their position or “enter into” their mental processes. However, empathy may also involve a more basic awareness of bodily and emotional-affective states. This appears to be rooted in a fundamental capacity to associate the bodily movements, gestures, expressions, and vocal inflections we perceive in others with states we experience ourselves. This chapter considers such phenomena in the context of human musicality. We first offer a brief overview of relevant research and discuss some problematic theoretical issues. Following this, we introduce two contrasting perspectives that appear to offer a way forward — Simulation Theory (ST) and Interaction Theory (IT), respectively. Building on the resulting insights, we then outline a provisional framework for musical empathy based in a relational “4E” approach to cognition — one that sees mental life as primarily embodied, embedded, enacted, and extended. Here we introduce two core concepts that are helpful for understanding musical empathy from this more embodied and ecological perspective, “musical scaffolding” and “empathic space.”
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    Live​@​IKLECTIK
    Butcher, J ; van der Schyff, D (Whirrboom! Records, 2019)
    Free improvisation for saxophones and percussion.
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    Understanding musical empathy: perspectives, problems, and possibilities
    van der Schyff, D ( 2019-09-28)
    Abstract only. Keynote at 2019 Conference in Interdisciplinary Musicology, Centre for Systematic Musicology, University of Graz, Austria
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    Cicatrices Intérieures
    van der Schyff, D ; Kaufmann, A ; Muller, T (Whirrboom! Records, 2015)
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    Tell Tale
    Lee, P ; van der Schyff, D ; Zubot, J ; Elaschuk, K ; Samworth, R ; Gestrin, C ; Lachance, A ; Muller, T (Songlines, 2016)
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    Fulfillment
    Blake, M ; Lee, P ; Carter, JP ; Bajakian, A ; Samworth, R ; van der Schyff, D ; Lachance, A ; Gestrin, C ; Neelamjit, D ; Postl, E (Songlines records, 2016)
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    Book of Transfigurations
    Úlehla, J ; Bajakian, A ; van der Schyff, D ; Lee, P ; Cowan, C ; Naylor, T (Songlines Records, 2017)