Melbourne Conservatorium of Music - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 548
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Group music therapy to support community-dwelling older adults living with dementia and their carers
    Clark, IN ( 2018-06-29)
    DAAD-UA symposium - Music Therapy and Dementia - Singende Krankenhäuser
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Older adults' music listening preferences to support physical activity following cardiac rehabilitation
    Clark, IN ; Baker, FA ; Taylor, NF ( 2016-01-01)
    Background: Music listening during exercise is thought to increase physiological arousal and enhance subjective experience, and may support physical activity participation among older adults with cardiac disease. However, little is known about how music preferences, or perceptions of music during exercise, inform clinical practice with this population. Objective: Identify predominant musical characteristics of preferred music selected by older adults, and explore participants' music listening experiences during walking-based exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. Methods: Twenty-seven participants aged 60 years and older (21 men, 6 women; mean age = 67.3 years) selected music to support walking over a 6-month intervention period, and participated in post-intervention interviews. In this two-phase study, we first identified predominant characteristics of participant-selected music using the Structural Model of Music Analysis. Second, we used inductive thematic analysis to explore participant experiences. Results: Predominant characteristics of participant-selected music included duple meter, consistent rhythm, major key, rounded melodic shape, legato articulation, predictable harmonies, variable volume, and episodes of tension with delayed resolution. There was no predominant tempo, with music selections ranging from slow through to medium and fast. Four themes emerged from thematic analysis of participant interviews: psycho-emotional responses, physical responses, influence on exercise behavior, and negative experiences. Conclusions: Findings are consistent with theory and research explaining influences from music listening on physiological arousal and subjective experience during exercise. Additionally, for older adults with cardiac disease, a holistic approach to music selection considering general well-being and adjustment issues, rather than just exercise performance, may improve long-term lifestyle changes and compliance with physical activity guidelines.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Older Adults' Music Listening Preferences to Support Physical Activity Following Cardiac Rehabilitation
    Clark, IN ; Baker, FA ; Taylor, NF (OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2016)
    BACKGROUND: Music listening during exercise is thought to increase physiological arousal and enhance subjective experience, and may support physical activity participation among older adults with cardiac disease. However, little is known about how music preferences, or perceptions of music during exercise, inform clinical practice with this population. OBJECTIVE: Identify predominant musical characteristics of preferred music selected by older adults, and explore participants' music listening experiences during walking-based exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. METHODS: Twenty-seven participants aged 60 years and older (21 men, 6 women; mean age = 67.3 years) selected music to support walking over a 6-month intervention period, and participated in post-intervention interviews. In this two-phase study, we first identified predominant characteristics of participant-selected music using the Structural Model of Music Analysis. Second, we used inductive thematic analysis to explore participant experiences. RESULTS: Predominant characteristics of participant-selected music included duple meter, consistent rhythm, major key, rounded melodic shape, legato articulation, predictable harmonies, variable volume, and episodes of tension with delayed resolution. There was no predominant tempo, with music selections ranging from slow through to medium and fast. Four themes emerged from thematic analysis of participant interviews: psycho-emotional responses, physical responses, influence on exercise behavior, and negative experiences. CONCLUSIONS: Findings are consistent with theory and research explaining influences from music listening on physiological arousal and subjective experience during exercise. Additionally, for older adults with cardiac disease, a holistic approach to music selection considering general well-being and adjustment issues, rather than just exercise performance, may improve long-term lifestyle changes and compliance with physical activity guidelines.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Participant-selected music and physical activity in older adults following cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial
    Clark, IN ; Baker, FA ; Peiris, CL ; Shoebridge, G ; Taylor, NF (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2017-03)
    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of participant-selected music on older adults' achievement of activity levels recommended in the physical activity guidelines following cardiac rehabilitation. DESIGN: A parallel group randomized controlled trial with measurements at Weeks 0, 6 and 26. SETTING: A multisite outpatient rehabilitation programme of a publicly funded metropolitan health service. SUBJECTS: Adults aged 60 years and older who had completed a cardiac rehabilitation programme. INTERVENTIONS: Experimental participants selected music to support walking with guidance from a music therapist. Control participants received usual care only. MAIN MEASURES: The primary outcome was the proportion of participants achieving activity levels recommended in physical activity guidelines. Secondary outcomes compared amounts of physical activity, exercise capacity, cardiac risk factors, and exercise self-efficacy. RESULTS: A total of 56 participants, mean age 68.2 years (SD = 6.5), were randomized to the experimental ( n = 28) and control groups ( n = 28). There were no differences between groups in proportions of participants achieving activity recommended in physical activity guidelines at Week 6 or 26. Secondary outcomes demonstrated between-group differences in male waist circumference at both measurements (Week 6 difference -2.0 cm, 95% CI -4.0 to 0; Week 26 difference -2.8 cm, 95% CI -5.4 to -0.1), and observed effect sizes favoured the experimental group for amounts of physical activity (d = 0.30), exercise capacity (d = 0.48), and blood pressure (d = -0.32). CONCLUSIONS: Participant-selected music did not increase the proportion of participants achieving recommended amounts of physical activity, but may have contributed to exercise-related benefits.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Fields of resonance from group therapeutic songwriting for people living with dementia and their family caregivers
    Clark, I ; Stretton-Smith, P ; Baker, F ; Tamplin, J (European Music Therapy Confederation, 2019)
    People living with dementia (PwD) and their family caregivers (FCG) often experience relationship stressors, social isolation and stigma. Therapeutic group songwriting (TGS) has been used to address these issues for groups involving either FCG or PwD, but not with groups of PwD/FCG dyads participating together. TGS for PwD/FCG dyads may encourage united expression with others in similar situations, leading to mental stimulation and achievement for individuals, meaningful shared experiences for dyads, and positive social opportunities. A randomised controlled trial is being conducted to compare social connectedness, relationship quality, quality of life, depression, and caregiver burden for 60 PwD/FCG dyads randomised to either 6 x 1-hour weekly TGS sessions (experimental) or waitlist control (University Ethics Approval: 1851252.2). Outcome measures will be collected at weeks 0, 7 and 13 following recruitment and the experimental group will also contribute video, interview, and song lyric data. The project is currently in the data collection phase. However, we anticipate several potential fields of resonance from this research, including feelings of personal success and confidence for both PwD and FCG, relationship satisfaction and togetherness for dyads, and empathic friendships. In addition, we anticipate songs portraying the lived experience of dementia may increase public awareness and understanding. This presentation will describe how theories and songwriting approaches were adapted to meet the unique needs of PwD and FCGs attending sessions together. We will also explore tensions arising from the outcome-based research design and expectations of research funding bodies with the values of community music therapy underpinning the research.
  • Item
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    NELLI SHKOLNIKOVA 1928-2010
    Thompson, C (Newsquest Media Group, 2010-09-01)
    The great Russian violinist and pedagogue died early in 2010. Curt Thompson, one of her former students, looks back on her life and examines her teaching methods.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Music Therapy Methods with Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Severe Neurobehavioral Disorders Due to Brain Injury
    Magee, W ; Baker, F ; Daveson, B ; Hitchen, H ; Kennelly, J ; Leung, M ; Tamplin, J ( 2011)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Music Therapy Methods with Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Severe Neurobehavioral Disorders Due to Brain Injury
    Magee, WL ; Baker, F ; Daveson, B ; Hitchen (Nee Roshier), H ; Kennelly, J ; Leung, M ; Tamplin, J (Oxford University Press, 2011-05-01)
    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the application of music therapy intervention in neurobehavioral treatment programs with pediatric, adolescent and adult populations through the presentation of six case reports, with special reference to post-traumatic amnesia. Severe behavioral disorders stemming from brain injury are challenging for both the affected individual and their support network. Managing neurobehavioral disorders requires specialist skills and knowledge of various strategies to minimize behavioral incidents and decrease episodes of agitation. Music therapy interventions are effective in increasing orientation and decreasing agitation in people with post-traumatic amnesia following brain injury (Baker, 2001). However, there is little published guidance or research on music therapy interventions for use in interdisciplinary rehabilitation programs for patients with short-term or chronic neurobehavioral disorders following traumatic brain injury. Music therapy is well-placed as a part of interdisciplinary rehabilitation with this population, offering opportunities to enable emotional expression and improve pragmatic communication skills and social interaction. This case material provided illustrates how music therapists integrate family members into treatment programs, and work with others to enable multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary outcomes.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Assessment of Breathing Patterns and Respiratory Muscle Recruitment During Singing and Speech in Quadriplegia
    Tamplin, J ; Brazzale, DJ ; Pretto, JJ ; Ruehland, WR ; Buttifant, M ; Brown, DJ ; Berlowitz, DJ (Elsevier, 2011-02-01)
    OBJECTIVES: To explore how respiratory impairment after cervical spinal cord injury affects vocal function, and to explore muscle recruitment strategies used during vocal tasks after quadriplegia. It was hypothesized that to achieve the increased respiratory support required for singing and loud speech, people with quadriplegia use different patterns of muscle recruitment and control strategies compared with control subjects without spinal cord injury. DESIGN: Matched, parallel-group design. SETTING: Large university-affiliated public hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Consenting participants with motor-complete C5-7 quadriplegia (n=6) and able-bodied age-matched controls (n=6) were assessed on physiologic and voice measures during vocal tasks. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Standard respiratory function testing, surface electromyographic activity from accessory respiratory muscles, sound pressure levels during vocal tasks, the Voice Handicap Index, and the Perceptual Voice Profile. RESULTS: The group with quadriplegia had a reduced lung capacity (vital capacity, 71% vs 102% of predicted; P=.028), more perceived voice problems (Voice Handicap Index score, 22.5 vs 6.5; P=.046), and greater recruitment of accessory respiratory muscles during both loud and soft volumes (P=.028) than the able-bodied controls. The group with quadriplegia also demonstrated higher accessory muscle activation in changing from soft to loud speech (P=.028). CONCLUSIONS: People with quadriplegia have impaired vocal ability and use different muscle recruitment strategies during speech than the able-bodied. These findings will enable us to target specific measurements of respiratory physiology for assessing functional improvements in response to formal therapeutic singing training.