Melbourne Conservatorium of Music - Research Publications

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    Organisational change for creativity in education
    de Bruin, L ; Snepvangers, K ; Thomson, P ; Harris, A (Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, 2018-01-01)
    Organisations routinely approach change mechanistically, identifying needs, strategies, improvements, and assessing results correlated to intended outcomes and objectives. This is a fine irony when school organisations aim to support students to become creative, flexible, and adaptable citizens and workers. This chapter proposes an alternative developmental approach by surveying distributed leadership, problematizing common assumptions and applications in school organisational practice. Argyris and Schön’s double-loop learning model (Organizational learning II: theory method and practice. Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1996) is explored as a viable and transformative construct for change that tests underlying assumptions of goals, objectives and strategies. Whilst single-loop focuses on lower-level, low-risk change and assumes common values, double-loop learning mobilises higher order change-visioning, engages reflective practice, challenging beliefs, behaviours, conventional thinking, and adaption. This chapter reconceptualises organisational thinking through developing adaptable, sustainable and democratic forms of leadership necessary in schools.
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    Creative Ecologies in Education Futures
    de Bruin, L ; Harris, AM ; Mullen, CA (Springer, 2019)
    The challenge to foster greater creativity in education systems represents a range of diverse and complex affordances and constraints. Creativity research in education spans policy, teaching, learning and assessment, as well as environments within and beyond the school that promote creative encounters. Worldwide, creativity, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills are marked as essential for effective learners and future employees. Creativity is closely linked with the development of flexible thinking and lateral problem-solving. Yet a shift is occurring from interest in creative individuals to creative ecologies in sociocultural formations of digitally networked cultures and collaborative methods of thinking. The value of attending to increasing creative sociality within and between diverse cultures and contexts is growing. Drawing on an international study of creativity in secondary schools across Australia, Canada, Singapore, and the United States, the authors argue that because creativity in education is central to lifelong learning and work satisfaction, schools must radically shift toward a more interdisciplinary whole-school creative ecology approach, and away from siloed disciplinary and individualist learning. The chapter draws on aspects of creative ecologies in education that combine science, technology, arts, culture, and industry, showing creativity as a fundamental aspect of education across all domains.
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    Playing an Instrument
    MCPHERSON, G ; Davidson, J ; Evans, P ; McPherson, G (Oxford University Press, 2016)
    Learning to play a musical instrument is one of the most widespread musical activities for children. While much research in the past century has focused on the assessment of musical abilities and the content of their lessons, more recent research has focused on children’s interactions with their social environments and how these interactions impact their ongoing ability and motivation to learn and play music. This chapter explores these social and cognitive developments starting with how children and their parents select an instrument and negotiate the commencement of formal music learning, through to the task related cognitive strategies children use to overcome the difficulties associated with learning and practice, and the ways they may eventually become able to integrate an identity as a musician with their own sense of self. Aspects of self-regulation and self-determination theory are discussed.
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    Introduction to Fernando Sor: Cendrillon
    CHRISTOFORIDIS, M ; Kertesz, E (Editions Orphee, 2016)
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    Developing Tests of Music Performance Improvisation
    McPherson, G ; Brophy, T (Oxford University Press, 2019)
    This chapter presents a survey of research on the development and validation of a measure to assess instrumentalists’ ability to improvise music. It begins by framing efforts to distinguish between visual, aural, and creative forms of music performance, and the types of assessment tasks required to evaluate music performance improvisation. The chapter surveys a range of related measures that have been used to assess improvisational abilities in young developing musicians and provides a detailed description of the author’s own Test of Ability to Improvise (TAI) that he has used with beginning, intermediate, and advanced level school instrumentalists. Included also are examples of the instrumentalists’ improvisations and a discussion of the implications of the research findings for conceptions of musical development and practical applications within music education.
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    Families with preschool aged children with autism spectrum disorder
    THOMPSON, G ; Jacobsen, SL ; Thompson, G (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2016-09-21)
    Sigman, M. and Kasari, C. (1995) 'Joint Attention Across Contexts in Normal and Autistic Children. ... Thompson, G. (2014) 'A survey of parent's use of music in the home with their child with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Implications for building the capacity of families. ... 5 Music-Oriented Counselling Model for Parents of Childen with Autism FAMILIES WITH PRESCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN WITH ASD 115.
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    Developing Tests of Music Performance Improvisation
    McPherson, GE ; Brophy, TS (Oxford University Press, 2019-03-08)
    This chapter presents a survey of research on the development and validation of a measure to assess instrumentalists’ ability to improvise music. It begins by framing efforts to distinguish between visual, aural, and creative forms of music performance, and the types of assessment tasks required to evaluate music performance improvisation. The chapter surveys a range of related measures that have been used to assess improvisational abilities in young developing musicians and provides a detailed description of the author’s own Test of Ability to Improvise (TAI) that he has used with beginning, intermediate, and advanced level school instrumentalists. Included also are examples of the instrumentalists’ improvisations and a discussion of the implications of the research findings for conceptions of musical development and practical applications within music education.
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    Developing tests of musical improvisation performance
    McPherson, G ; Brophy, TS (Oxford University Press, 2019-03-28)
    This volume also looks at technical aspects of measurement in music, and outlines situations where theoretical foundations can be applied to the development of tests in music.
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    Musical Empathy, from Simulation to 4E Interaction
    van der Schyff, D ; Krueger, J ; Ferreira Corrêa, A (Brazilian Association of Cognition and Musical Arts, 2019-04-01)
    The term “empathy” refers to the ability to understand or feel the experience of another person. In folk psychology, this is often thought to involve a kind of mind reading, whereby we access the thoughts and intentions of others. For example, empathy might involve inferring the logical thought processes of an individual, allowing us to see how and why they make the choices they do. This includes some awareness of that person’s history, of their beliefs and background. As such, empathy can entail complex imaginative and deductive processes where, in a sense, we place ourselves in their position or “enter into” their mental processes. However, empathy may also involve a more basic awareness of bodily and emotional-affective states. This appears to be rooted in a fundamental capacity to associate the bodily movements, gestures, expressions, and vocal inflections we perceive in others with states we experience ourselves. This chapter considers such phenomena in the context of human musicality. We first offer a brief overview of relevant research and discuss some problematic theoretical issues. Following this, we introduce two contrasting perspectives that appear to offer a way forward — Simulation Theory (ST) and Interaction Theory (IT), respectively. Building on the resulting insights, we then outline a provisional framework for musical empathy based in a relational “4E” approach to cognition — one that sees mental life as primarily embodied, embedded, enacted, and extended. Here we introduce two core concepts that are helpful for understanding musical empathy from this more embodied and ecological perspective, “musical scaffolding” and “empathic space.”