Melbourne Conservatorium of Music - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 32
  • Item
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Self-regulation and the high school jazz and improvisation learner.
    de Bruin, L (ASME, 2017)
    Common to all musicians, and not just improvising ones is the development and adaptation of sensory-motor, audiative, imaginative and self-regulatory strategies. They develop self-regulatory behaviors of learning that involve the evolution of specific goals, strategies, self-evaluation, adjustment, reflection and monitoring of progress. Yet, whilst learning takes place in our minds, and as fascinating as neuroscience can shed light on music education, learning and teaching is negotiated within social and communicative environments. Recent cognition theories suggest that learning involves the attainment of automation, and the meshing of embodied skills and knowledge acquired through situated and experiential learning, acknowledging that from a social-cognitive perspective self-regulatory processes - learning to learn, and learning to be creative can be viewed as a set of relations that are actualized, mediated and activated through transactions among individuals, environments, and socio-cultural relations. Research on self-regulation that enhances creative processes has extended beyond the synthesizing of convergent and divergent thinking, and of teaching creatively and for creativity. Recent discourse on creativity now aligns with that of self-regulation in arguing that these principles are layered within a more complex distributed nature of learning and expression of knowledge, that identifies self-regulation, co-regulation and socially shared regulation of learning. Creativity scholars such as Burnard, Glaveneau and Sarath similarly articulate a ‘WE’ paradigm of emergent processes that evoke multiple creativities that mark a conspicuous and striking aspect of thinking, learning and self-regulation that enhances creativity in music-making.
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Intercultural and interdisciplinary approaches to creative music education: An Australasian perspective.
    de Bruin, L (ISME, 2018)
    Music education throughout the world is adopting a ‘creative turn’ in both the ways information and skill is transferred, as well as the underlying organisational ethos that complements this education. Music education is arguably resisting universal and homogenous approaches to music education, embracing increasingly differentiated perspectives, practices and local beliefs that assert against globalising trends. Organisations are confluent in their approaches to incorporating localised intercultural and interdisciplinary approaches evident in music making. This study investigates a Creative Music Intensive that brought Australian music students together with Indigenous Australian and Korean p’ansori musicians in a two-week residential exploratory and experiential music-making event. This intercultural exploration facilitated action, interplay and development of ‘possibility thinking’ relating to deep conceptualisations of inter-culturally shared music making and the wider interdisciplinary connections. Such practices offer music and music educator students institutions and communities critical and creative practices that resist centrified ideas and affirm ‘locality’ and community as the epicentre from which new knowledge, creativities, industry and bipartisanship can be found and negotiated. Intercultural collaborative music-making can promote empathy, knowledge and deep collective unity and solidarity at a critical time in music education.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Schaeffer, GRM and their influence on NES-tools for Max
    Hirst, D ; Vickery, L (The Australasian Computer Music Association, 2019)
    NES-Tools is a suite of audio signal processors emulating the GRM-Tools, but in the Max environment. This article provides the historical context for the creation of GRM- Tools, reaching back to the concepts developed by GRM’s founder Pierre Schaeffer, providing a summary of technological developments at GRM, then describing the details of each of the NES-Tools. The adaptability of using the Max environment is demonstrated, and recent translations to Max for Live are noted.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    NES-spectrale: a suite of max tools for processing in the frequency domain
    Hirst, D ; Vickery, L (The Australasian Computer Music Association, 2019)
    This project’s aim was to explore the notion of “timbre processing” using Jitter matrices as the store and processing mechanism. The NES-Spectrale suite of Max/Jitter patchers is a structured set of tools for processing sounds in the frequency domain, and inverse transforming the results into the time domain, in the form of audio signals. This collection of software tools extends the work of Jean-François Charles, providing an efficient and novel approach to FFT-based processing.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Efficacy of Parkinsong Groups for improving Communication and Wellbeing in Parkinson's Disease
    Tamplin, J ; Vogel, A ; Marigliani, C ; Baker, FA ; Davidson, J ; Morris, ME ; Mercadal-Brotons, M ; Clements-Cortes, A (World Federation of Music Therapy, 2017)
    Communication impairment is one of the most common symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, significantly impacting quality of life (Miller, 2012). Speech characteristics may include a soft, monotone, breathy or hoarse voice quality, imprecise articulation, dysprosody and dysfluency (Skodda et al., 2013). These characteristics, combined with reduced nonverbal communication, cognitive-linguistic impairment and poor self-perception of speech, make communication difficult and lead to self-consciousness, reduced likelihood to participate in conversation, and the avoidance of social interaction that requires speaking. Communication difficulties can compound issues of depression and related social isolation (Miller et al., 2006).
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Musical memories: Connecting people with dementia and their caregivers through song.
    Clark, I ; Tamplin, J ; Lee, J ; Baker, F ; Mercadal-Brotons, M ; Clements-Cortes, A (World Federation of Music Therapy, 2017)
    Active music participation may offer benefits for people with dementia (PWD) and their family care givers (FCG) living in the community (Baird & Samson, 2015). For the PWD, this capacity to respond to music-making activities, such as singing, may facilitate reminiscence and successful social engagement (Vanstone & Cuddy, 2010). As a consequence, FCG may experience meaningful and satisfying connection with their loved one (Baker, Grocke & Pachana, 2012). Receptive music listening interventions may also assist with the management of challenging symptoms of dementia, such as agitation and anxiety, offering FCG strategies to use in the home.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Supporting Healthy Ageing and Management of Age Related Disease in Australia
    Clark, I (World Federation of Music Therapy, 2017)
    As the global population ages, more people are experiencing the privilege of growing old. By 2050, estimates suggest that over 2 billion people will be aged 60 years or over (WHO, 2016). Current buzz terms, including healthy ageing and active ageing, are used to describe the notion of optimal health, independent life participation and security required for high quality of life through the full course of life. In Australia, 2 major policies support principles of healthy ageing (AIHW, 2017): 1) Preventative health, promotes healthy lifestyle choices, such as physical activity participation; 2) Living longer better, has a strong focus on supporting people with dementia (PWD) and their family caregivers (FCG). This presentation will discuss recent music therapy research in Australia targeted to address these policies.