Melbourne Conservatorium of Music - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 28
  • Item
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Ethical considerations for sustainable music training using VR technology: a case study of performance anxiety.
    Osborne, M ; Glasser, S ; Loveridge, B ( 2022-04-08)
    Presentation given at the 2022 Teaching Music Online in Higher Education (TMOHE) and Music, Education and Technology (MET) online international conference. INTRODUCTION Simulation training is used to develop performance skills in various disciplines, particularly where in-situ training is either impossible or unsafe to implement (Renganayagalu et al., 2021). Such training enables learners to acclimatise to real-life stressors and anxiety-inducing scenarios in a physically and/or psychologically safe environments, to protect against performance decrements which reveal themselves in high pressure contexts rather than low-stress practice sessions. BACKGROUND Recent work using immersive virtual reality (VR) provides preliminary evidence of the capacity of this technology to evoke music performance anxiety (Fadeev et al., 2020; Fanger et al., 2020). In this study, we explore the capacity of VR to assist music students to develop technical and psychological competence to perform at their best under pressure implemented within tertiary music institution settings. METHOD Richie’s Plank Experience (Toast VR, 2016) was used to approximate the physiological symptoms of high-stress performance in a single case pilot study with a highly trained violinist. Prior to exposure, a performance psychologist taught the participant a pre-performance routine with demonstrated utility in musicians (Osborne et al., 2014). The psychologist subsequently guided the participant remotely through the routine via Zoom, whilst the participant was immersed in the VR environment. Heart rate, subjective units of distress, and confidence measurements were taken across five levels of exposure which varied the integration of instrument and intervention. FINDINGS The plank task induced a notable stress response. Additionally, the musician was receptive to pre-performance routine instructions to downregulate their stress response. This created a performance focus when in the VR environment, demonstrated by decreased anxiety and increased confidence ratings across performance tasks. IMPLICATIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS We provide preliminary evidence for the capacity of immersive VR to induce the situational stress required to trigger a cascade of physical and psychological responses. The benefits of this technology need to be considered alongside areas such as privacy, storage, access, and accessibility
  • Item
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Self-regulation and the high school jazz and improvisation learner.
    de Bruin, L (ASME, 2017)
    Common to all musicians, and not just improvising ones is the development and adaptation of sensory-motor, audiative, imaginative and self-regulatory strategies. They develop self-regulatory behaviors of learning that involve the evolution of specific goals, strategies, self-evaluation, adjustment, reflection and monitoring of progress. Yet, whilst learning takes place in our minds, and as fascinating as neuroscience can shed light on music education, learning and teaching is negotiated within social and communicative environments. Recent cognition theories suggest that learning involves the attainment of automation, and the meshing of embodied skills and knowledge acquired through situated and experiential learning, acknowledging that from a social-cognitive perspective self-regulatory processes - learning to learn, and learning to be creative can be viewed as a set of relations that are actualized, mediated and activated through transactions among individuals, environments, and socio-cultural relations. Research on self-regulation that enhances creative processes has extended beyond the synthesizing of convergent and divergent thinking, and of teaching creatively and for creativity. Recent discourse on creativity now aligns with that of self-regulation in arguing that these principles are layered within a more complex distributed nature of learning and expression of knowledge, that identifies self-regulation, co-regulation and socially shared regulation of learning. Creativity scholars such as Burnard, Glaveneau and Sarath similarly articulate a ‘WE’ paradigm of emergent processes that evoke multiple creativities that mark a conspicuous and striking aspect of thinking, learning and self-regulation that enhances creativity in music-making.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Pedagogies of difference: a framework for pedagogical adaptation and creative climates
    de Bruin, L ; Randles, C (University of Southern Florida, 2021)
    Instrumental music tuition in schools is a powerful way teachers can guide students to immerse in detailed and specific aspects of learning. Regular lessons with a music teacher are a ubiquitous school activity where students engage with expert learning, practice, reflection and discourse of learning processes. This qualitative study examines teacher experiences in instrumental music education in Victoria, Australia. Investigating teacher perspectives to pedagogy that connect, engage and nurture instrumental music learning and exploration, this study of instrumental music teachers across four diverse schools in Victoria phenomenologically analysed teacher reflections on learning events with students. Analysis of interactions, pedagogies and adaptive behaviours between teacher and student revealed a dynamic social context spanning the instructional relationship between student action and teacher direction, the subject matter and substance of what is taught, and the connection between the student and the teacher as master musician. Looking beyond music teachers as adaptors that utilise generic descriptors of critical thinking, communication, creativity, and collaboration (4C’s of creativity) this study identifies and redefines the qualities of recognition, empathy, insightfulness and responsiveness outlining a (REIR) framework to which all teachers can shape pedagogical approaches that engage and educate learners in the future. Findings outline relationship-building and connective teacher-student relationships fostering multiple creativities in music learning. The study posits a recalibration of teacher practice on building positive collaborative learning climates, a relational adaptivity that emphasises effective interpersonal strategies that enhance student learning and potentially enculturate richer teacher understanding and more sophisticated musicianship in students.
  • Item
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Intercultural and interdisciplinary approaches to creative music education: An Australasian perspective.
    de Bruin, L (ISME, 2018)
    Music education throughout the world is adopting a ‘creative turn’ in both the ways information and skill is transferred, as well as the underlying organisational ethos that complements this education. Music education is arguably resisting universal and homogenous approaches to music education, embracing increasingly differentiated perspectives, practices and local beliefs that assert against globalising trends. Organisations are confluent in their approaches to incorporating localised intercultural and interdisciplinary approaches evident in music making. This study investigates a Creative Music Intensive that brought Australian music students together with Indigenous Australian and Korean p’ansori musicians in a two-week residential exploratory and experiential music-making event. This intercultural exploration facilitated action, interplay and development of ‘possibility thinking’ relating to deep conceptualisations of inter-culturally shared music making and the wider interdisciplinary connections. Such practices offer music and music educator students institutions and communities critical and creative practices that resist centrified ideas and affirm ‘locality’ and community as the epicentre from which new knowledge, creativities, industry and bipartisanship can be found and negotiated. Intercultural collaborative music-making can promote empathy, knowledge and deep collective unity and solidarity at a critical time in music education.
  • Item