Melbourne Conservatorium of Music - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 10
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Video Feedback to Support Student Assessment when Teaching Music Online
    Blackburn, A ; Johnson, C (The Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, 2021)
    The use of video when teaching music online is not a new endeavour. However, the implementation of consistent use of video as a feedback mechanism in music performance studies has yet to be fully researched. In tertiary music performance classes, students are subject to formative assessment to advance their musical artistry. These feedback mechanisms for music are more than text-based commentary. Often, they are visual and aural exchanges between a master performer (i.e., teacher) and student to support the essential development of musical artistry and artistic performance of the student’s voice or instrument through social construction. The question of how music teachers can provide online feedback that supports the authenticity of music assessment is now key for technology-enhanced music learning in tertiary music classes. This presentation will outline the challenges and opportunities of embedding video feedback in music classes to support students in developing music performance skills.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Online Music Teaching Toolkit
    Johnson, C (Piano Inspires, 2021-07-28)
    Invited PEdX Speaker for NCKP 2021: The Piano Conference
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Post-secondary online music course offerings prior to COVID-19: An Australian context
    Johnson, C (Australian Society for Music Education, 2021-09-30)
    The landscape of post-secondary music performance teaching and music education entered a pedagogical shift towards teaching music online prior to COVID-19. In post-secondary music courses, research indicates that over 40% of post-secondary American music schools within the National Association of Schools of Music offered at least one online music course at the bachelor level (Johnson, 2017). This strongly suggests that prior to COVID-19, American music programs were already shifting away from the traditional music pedagogy of face-to-face teaching to begin embracing the opportunities provided by teaching music online. However, the extent to which this was occurring outside of North America was not yet identified. To evidence further shifts in the global landscape towards post-secondary online music course availability, this research study explored the following research questions within the Australian context: 1) What online music courses are currently being offered at higher education institutions across Australia? 2) What, if any, are the significant changes happening in these Australian offerings over time? Data were examined using a historical methodology of documentation analyses of public-facing websites from all universities (n=43) within Australia. Findings specific to universities, course offerings, and changes over time will be highlighted in the presentation. Implications from this study suggest that differing rates of adoption in online teaching may have provided insight for decisions made during the COVID-19 transitions to online music teaching regarding effective leadership models and professional development models. Future recommendations on further research will also be highlighted. Acknowledgement: The author would like to thank SEMPRE for the funding of this research study.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Experience of Virtual Writing Groups: Going Beyond Geographic Boundaries
    Johnson, C ; Lock, JV (Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), 2018)
    There are greater expectations on academics, including career professors, to publish. How and where within their graduate programs did they develop the knowledge and capacity to be competent scholarly writers? Using a self-study research approach, we investigated strategies as part of a pilot designed to assess the impact of virtual writing groups on early career researchers’ publication output and the transition process from doctoral student to full-time academic. This pilot study informed the launch of a larger virtual writing group. The virtual writing group, includes early career academic, along with former doctoral supervisor supporting their transition as academics around their scholarly writing. The study explores the following research questions: 1) To what extent does a virtual writing group assist publication output through the transition of PhD student to early career researcher; and 2) What factors are integral for the effectiveness of a virtual writing group for early career researchers? Directions for future research are shared.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Making Multimedia Meaningful: Outcomes of Student Assessment in Online Learning
    Johnson, C ; Lock, JV ; Langran, E ; Borup, J (Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), 2018)
    With the advancement of multimedia in learning management systems, online learning environments are no longer bound by text-based learning. Students and instructors need to work in an environment where there is intentional integration of multimedia that supports learning, teaching, and assessment. This case study investigated the intentional instructor use of multimedia and the impact on student learning tasks and assessment practice. From the findings, three themes were identified: the perception of multimedia as novel for students; student awareness of multimedia feedback as assistive in learning; and the integration of scaffolded learning through reflective activities. The following implications for practice address areas for creating effective online learning experiences when using multimedia: 1) students need support in using multimedia; 2) instructors need to unpack assumptions about student use of technology for learning; and 3) multimedia tools and supports need to be available in fostering robust learning experiences.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Designing online orientations for higher education music students: A proposed framework
    Johnson, C ; Binns, G ; Campbell, M ; Willems, J ; Adachi, C ; Blake, D ; Doherty, I ; Krishnan, S ; Macfarlane, S ; Ngo, L ; O'Donnell, M ; Palmer, S ; Riddell, L ; Story, I ; Suri, H ; Tai, J (ASCILITE, 2018)
    Online orientations can provide university students with helpful introductions to relevant knowledge and skills they will need over the course of their studies. While traditional models of university orientation focus on face-to-face lecture delivery and often depend on individual, time-specified events, the online environment can be used for more interactive and discipline-specific orientation. The adoption of an online orientation approach can further provide students with information accessible in manageable time frames and supportive practical applications. Aligned to research literature, this paper proposes a framework for developing an online orientation program for higher education undergraduate and graduate music students. The framework brings together the design benefits of the online environment in conjunction with literature on effective practices of orientation programs. As such, the framework identifies four components of influence when designing an online orientation: Purpose; Audience; Design construction; and Content topic considerations. Areas for future research are also highlighted.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Online Curriculum Mapping: Designing for Teaching Presence in Online Music Courses
    Johnson, C (Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), 2018)
    As online courses develop into larger online programs, curriculum mapping is a necessary tool for ensuring overall alignment. However, in the online environment, the importance of teaching presence should be considered as foundational towards program mapping goals. This paper explores the process of curriculum mapping from the program level down into the course objectives. Further, the alignment of teaching presence to course assessments is identified due to the integral nature of designed interaction when in the online environment. Aspects of Universal Design for Learning and its connections to multiple means of representation and expression are highlighted. Three practical examples are provided for instructors to use as entry points for reflective exploration in teaching design, assessment, course objectives and program goal alignment. Recommendations and directions for future research in online curricular mapping are provided.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Virtual Writing Groups: Collegial support in developing academic writing capacity
    Johnson, C ; Lock, J ; Brown, M (Dublin City University, 2020)
    It is expected that academic staff at research intensive higher education institutions are capable and competent academic writers. Yet, where and how do early career academics develop this writing capacity outside of their doctoral or postdoctoral writing experiences? Various forms of workshops and mentorships can be implemented. They can involve formal or informal gatherings of people committed to achieving writing goals within a specific period of time (Badenhorst et al., 2016). For academic writing, Olszewska and Lock (2016) identified two models - “Structured and Guided Process” (p. 136) and “Open Forum with Retreat” (p. 137). Further, what role can a virtual writing group play in developing academic writing capacity? The authors developed and implemented three iterations of a virtual writing group series. Initially, the pilot study of the writing group began with a senior and early career academic located in Canada and Australia. In the additional iterations, the senior academic, along with a group of early career academics, engaged in the virtual writing group experience. Personal writing goals were identified prior to commencement of each eight-week series. Members met weekly for 30-minute synchronous meetings wherein they talked about their writing. Meeting topics were generative in nature to support the needs of the participants. During the week, each member was committed to personal writing time (e.g., up to two hours). An integral component of the writing group was peer editing. Together, the virtual writing group initiative was strategic to support prioritizing writing. For each iteration, a research study was conducted to gain insight into the participants’ experiences, and to learn of personal academic writing development. The findings resulted in five major themes: 1) Attributes that impact success; 2) Supportive characteristics; 3) Supportive processes; 4) Challenges; and 5) Benefits. The findings from the study suggest that it is possible for early career researchers to continue their writing development through accessible online means, while having the flexibility to allocate their own personal writing time. From the study focus on the practical application of a virtual writing group. It is recommended that future study explore how different forms of technology supports community development within the group, as well as members’ influence on the replication of virtual writing group models with their own students.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Video feedback in tertiary music performance classes
    Johnson, C ; Blackburn, A (University of New England, Armidale, 2021)
    Video feedback can be an important and key mechanism for supporting online student learning in higher education. In the context of online music teaching, video feedback provides a necessary audio and visual element to support music students’ learning of music performance practice. A predecessor to a larger study in video feedback, this pilot study sought to explore instructor perceptions of the use of video feedback in music performance teaching classes. Using self-study methodology, findings suggest that video feedback can effectively complement individualised online music teaching within an undergraduate performance class and a Master of Music Performance Teaching group music class, provide supportive scaffolding for self-regulated learning, and offer students opportunities to create meaningful student-instructor connections and community. Strategies for effective implementation by way of self-regulation and communication are also addressed.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Developing Digital Literacy Skills Through Online Music Orientations
    Johnson, C ; Gonzales, P (ISME, 2021-03-23)
    The adoption of a faculty or department orientations for students can be a supportive tool for those students new to university learning, as well as students returning to university studies. Focused orientations can decrease attrition as well as help students better navigate the institution and its offerings for enrolled students. Further, orientations that help student develop technological skills have been found to support stronger overall student learning outcomes as they can focus on course work rather than learning technologies required during the semester.