Surgery (RMH) - Research Publications

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    Priority recommendations for the implementation of patient-reported outcomes in clinical cancer care: a Delphi study
    Mazariego, C ; Jefford, M ; Chan, RJ ; Roberts, N ; Millar, L ; Anazodo, A ; Hayes, S ; Brown, B ; Saunders, C ; Webber, K ; Vardy, J ; Girgis, A ; Koczwara, B (SPRINGER, 2022-02-02)
    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to develop priority recommendations for the service level implementation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) into clinical cancer care. METHODS: Development of draft guidance statements was informed by a literature review, the Knowledge to Action (KTA) implementation framework, and discussion with PRO experts and cancer survivors. A two-round modified Delphi survey with key stakeholders including cancer survivors, clinical and research experts, and Information Technology specialists was undertaken. Round 1 rated the importance of the statements and round 2 ranked statements in order of priority. RESULTS: Round 1 was completed by 70 participants with round 2 completed by 45 participants. Forty-seven statements were rated in round 2. In round 1, the highest agreement items (>90% agreement) included those that focused on the formation of strong stakeholder partnerships, ensuring ongoing communication within these partnerships, and the use of PROs for improvement and guidance in clinical care. Items ranked as the highest priorities in round 2 included assessment of current staff capabilities and service requirements, mapping of workflows and processes to enable collection, and using collected PROs to guide improved health outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: This stakeholder consultation process has identified key priorities in PRO implementation into clinical cancer care that include clinical relevance, stakeholder engagement, communication, and integration within the existing processes and capabilities. IMPLICATION FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Routine adoption of PRO collection by clinical cancer services requires multiple implementation steps; of highest priority is strong engagement and communication with key stakeholders including cancer survivors.
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    Survival outcomes in elderly men undergoing radical prostatectomy in Australia
    Ranasinghe, W ; Wang, LL ; Persad, R ; Bolton, D ; Lawrentschuk, N ; Sengupta, S (WILEY, 2018-03-01)
    BACKGROUND: To investigate the outcomes of patients older than 75 years of age in Victoria undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. METHODS: Data on all men undergoing radical prostatectomy in Victoria between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2014 were obtained from the Victorian Cancer Registry. Tumour characteristics including Gleason grade, stage of disease and cause of death were obtained. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared test, Cox proportional hazards method and Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: A total of 14 686 men underwent radical prostatectomy during the defined period, with a median follow-up of 58 months. Of these, 332 were men over the age of 75. All parameters are comparisons between patients >75 years of age and men <75 years of age. Men >75 years had a higher proportion of Gleason grade ≥8 disease (16.6% versus 11.4%, P < 0.001) but had similar stage of disease. Men >75 years had lower rates of 5- and 10-year overall survival (67.3% versus 96.3% and 27.7% versus 89.1%) and lower rates of 5- and 10-year prostate cancer-specific survival (96.2% versus 99.3% and 94.3% versus 97.4%), respectively. Age was an independent risk factor for prostate cancer specific and overall mortality on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.32-1.68; P < 0.001 and hazard ratio 4.26, 95% confidence interval 2.15-8.42; P < 0.001), when adjusted for stage and grade. CONCLUSION: Older men undergoing radical prostatectomy in Victoria had higher-grade disease but similar stage. Age was an independent risk factor for worse prostate cancer-specific and overall survival.
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    Outcomes of women at high familial risk for breast cancer: An 8-year single-center experience
    Lammert, J ; Skandarajah, AR ; Shackleton, K ; Calder, P ; Thomas, S ; Lindeman, GJ ; Mann, GB (WILEY, 2019-10-28)
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    National Speakers
    Reynolds, B ; Nzenza, T ; Ngweso, S ; Browne, C ; MacCraith, E ; Manning, T ; Sathianathen, N ; Muilwijk, T ; Pinto, K ; Meraney, A ; Keane, K ; Cecchi, S ; Nolazco, JI ; Kasivisvanathan, V ; Hayne, D ; Bolton, D ; Lawrentschuk, N (WILEY, 2019-07-01)
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    Patient derived organoid model of penile squamous cell carcinoma
    Teh, J ; Guerra, G ; Heriot, A ; Ramsay, R ; Lawrentschuk, N (Elsevier BV, 2020-07)
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    Profile and Trends in Comorbidity for Patients Undergoing Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Using the Rx-Risk Measure with Pharmaceutical Dispensing Records
    Kerr, M ; Graves, SE ; Pratt, N ; Inacio, M ; Duszynski, K ; Gulyani, A ; De Steiger, R ; Harris, I ; Ackerman, I ; Jorm, L ; Lorimer, M (Swansea University, 2020-12-07)
    IntroductionPatient comobidity at time of primary joint replacement (JR) impacts on outcomes including revision and mortality. Understanding changes in comorbidity profiles is important when assessing change in outcomes over time. Most arthroplasty registries have limited comorbidity information due to their minimum dataset. One approach to obtaining additional comorbidity data is linking registry data with national administrative data. Objectives and ApproachObjectives were to quantify pre-operative comorbidity profile of patients undergoing primary total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) for osteoarthritis. Also, to examine temporal trends in individual comorbidities for THR and TKR patients. National pharmaceutical dispensing data were linked with THR and TKR arthroplasty patients. Medication dispensing histories in 12-months preceding JR (2003-2017) for 237,333 THR and 394,965 TKR patients, were mapped to 47 comorbidity classes using the Rx-Risk-V measure - a pharmacy-based measure of comorbidity. Comorbidity scores were calculated by summing comorbidity categories for individual patients. Trends in comorbidity scores/categories were described, with comorbidity information presented by PBS beneficiary category (concessional/general), stratified by age (<65/≥65 years). ResultsMedian (interquartile range) comorbidity scores were higher in concessional patients ≥65y, THR:5(3-6), TKR:5(3-7); <65y,TKR:5(3-6) but not THR:4(2-6). Comparative scores for general patients (both ages) were THR:4(2-6) and TKR:3(2-5). Trends in median comorbidity scores were consistent across study period, THR:4- 5(concessional)/2-3(general) and TKR:4-5(concessional)/4(general). Commonly identified comorbidities in younger concessional THR patients were pain, measured by opioid use (62.4%), inflammation/pain, measured by use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (62.2%), GORD (36.2%) and hypertension (36.1%). Individual comorbidities remained generally stable over time. However, increased patient proportions were seen in THR concessionals <65y for opioid pain (59.1%-71.1%), depression (24.5-42.5%), whilst inflammation/pain (82.1-56.1%) and antiplatelet use (≥65y:23.5-9.2%) declined. Conclusion / Implicationsn THR or TKR patients no appreciable change in comorbidity score or comorbidity profile occurred over time. This suggests that improving JR outcomes over time are unlikely due solely to variation in patient comorbidity profiles.
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    Enhancing Joint Replacement Outcomes Through Registry Linkage with National Health Administrative Data in Australia
    Duszynski, K ; Graves, SE ; Pratt, N ; Inacio, M ; De Steiger, R ; Harris, I ; Ackerman, I ; Jorm, L ; Lorimer, M ; Gulyani, A (Swansea University, 2020-12-07)
    IntroductionMonitoring of joint replacement (JR) data from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) has reduced revision rates and improved surgical practice. Outcome assessment post-arthroplasty is limited however, to revision (reoperation) surgery and mortality outcomes. The AOANJRR National Data Linkage project seeks to broaden the scope of outcomes investigation in Australia by linking registry and health administrative datasets. Objectives and ApproachUsing linked registry and administrative data, the project seeks to describe and quantify national/regional trends and variation in major complications (infection, dislocation, arthrofibrosis, chronic pain, venous thromboembolism, cardiac events), malignancy and health service utilisation (readmissions, emergency encounters and inpatient rehabilitation) following hip, knee and shoulder joint replacement surgery. Evidence will be generated on how these outcomes are associated with and vary according to patient, surgical, implant, hospital and pharmacological factors. As Australia lacks a national identifier, seven linkage agencies are probabilistically linking AOANJRR hip, knee and shoulder replacement data (1999-2017) with 20 datasets. Datasets include government-subsidised health services, procedural and prescription data. Hospital separations and emergency attendance data from Australia’s eight jurisdictions together with national cancer registry and rehabilitation service data are also planned for linkage. Linked data are maintained in a secure remote access computing environment. ResultsTo date, national Medicare Benefits Schedule, Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and the Australian Cancer Database data have been linked with >900,000 AOANJRR patients, representing 607.6 million health service records (1999-2018), 467.7 million prescriptions (2002-2018) and 184,000 cancer records, respectively. Remaining linked data will be available in mid-2020. Some initial summary results across a selected range of studies will be presented. Conclusion / ImplicationsThis national data-linkage program will identify areas for improvement in joint replacement surgery and modifiable risk factors contributing to poor patient outcomes.
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    ARE VICTORIAN WOMEN INTERESTED IN RISK STRATIFIED BREAST SCREENING?
    Lippey, J ; Keogh, L ; Mann, GB ; Campbell, I ; Forrest, L (CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE, 2020-04-01)
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    Treatment and outcomes of unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer treated in public and private Australian hospitals
    To, YH ; Shapiro, J ; Wong, R ; Thomson, B ; Nagrial, A ; Mendis, S ; Gibbs, P ; Shapiro, J ; Lee, B (WILEY, 2021-11-23)
    BACKGROUND: Prior studies have reported for several cancer types that treatment in the private sector is associated with improved survival outcomes. Data for patients with locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have not previously been reported. METHODS: Analysis of patients from January 2016 to June 2020 registered to a multicentre prospective cancer database. Baseline demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics were compared. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare overall survival (OS). Multivariate Cox and logistic regression analyses were used to determine predictors of mortality and first-line chemotherapy treatment, respectively. RESULTS: Of 822 patients, 22.5% received private care. Private patients were older (median 71.5 vs. 68.9 years, p ≤ .05), had better performance status (ECOG 0 to 1: 82.2 vs. 73.5%, p = .05) and more likely to reside in an area with high socioeconomic advantage (67.0 vs. 19.6%, p ≤ .01). Private patients were more likely to receive first-line chemotherapy (69.7 vs. 54.2%, p ≤ .01) with logistic regression demonstrating private care (OR: 1.87, 95% CI: 1.20 to 2.97) as an independent predictor of receiving chemotherapy. Private patients had prolonged survival (median OS: 9.2 vs. 6.9 months, HR 1.2, p = .05). Receiving first-line chemotherapy was an independent predictor of mortality, but private care was not. CONCLUSIONS: Care in the private system is associated with improved OS, with higher uptake of first-line chemotherapy appearing to be the main contributor. Given the discrepancy, further studies are needed to determine what factors are driving this difference.
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    Continuous bladder irrigation after transurethral resection of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer for prevention of tumour recurrence: a systematic review
    Li, M ; Toniolo, J ; Nandurkar, R ; Papa, N ; Lawrentschuk, N ; Davis, ID ; Sengupta, S (WILEY, 2021-04-23)
    BACKGROUND: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) can recur despite transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) that clears macroscopic disease, partly from re-implantation of exfoliated cells. Immediate instillation of intravesical chemotherapy (IC) can reduce recurrence, is guideline-recommended but is under-utilized. Continuous bladder irrigation (CBI) immediately post-TURBT is postulated to prevent re-implantation, and may provide a simple, cheap and practical alternative. We undertook a systematic review to assess the effect of CBI on NMIBC recurrence. METHODS: Following PRISMA guidelines, relevant publications were identified by online search of databases, including Ovid Medline and EMBASE (1980-2019). All published prospective randomized controlled trials comparing CBI post-TURBT to a control group were included. The primary end-point was recurrence. RESULTS: Our search yielded 514 studies, of which six met inclusion criteria. Two studies (935 participants), albeit without peer-reviewed publication, comparing CBI to no CBI both showed a reduction in recurrence at 2 years. Four publications from three trials (331 participants) compared CBI to IC, showing similar recurrence rates at 1 year (odds ratio 1.29, 95% confidence interval 0.78-2.13) but a lower risk of adverse events (6-34% versus 27-48%). CONCLUSION: CBI post-TURBT appears to yield 1-year recurrence rates of NMIBC comparable to immediate IC. However, existing studies are small and of heterogenous design, precluding definitive conclusions. Further trials are required to determine if CBI can be implemented routinely to reduce NMIBC recurrence, as well as the optimal irrigant, volume and duration.