Arts Collected Works - Research Publications

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    Cross border communications: Rethinking internationalisation during the pandemic
    MacNeill, K ; Li, D ; McIntosh, M (Journal of Comparative & International Higher Education, 2023)
    In this essay, we set out to explore the ways in which our approaches and assumptions around internationalisation, and the experiences of international students, have been challenged. Drawing on our experiences as academics through the transitioning times over the last two years in Australia, we have chosen to approach this through a series of reflections relying on four themes: university as an imagined community, globalisation, home not as a metaphor, and a journey toward humility. Through this essay, we invite discussions on these topics to foster excellence in teaching and learning in the field of internationalisation in the higher education sector.
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    English teacher education in the time of COVID: Australian teacher educators share their experiences
    Bacalja, A ; Parr, G ; McGraw,, K ; Dutton, J ; Diamond, F (Australian Association for the Teaching of English (AATE), 2021-12-01)
    Many studies have repor ted the disruption and anxiety associated with initial teacher education programs across the world lurching in and out of online and remote teaching because of COVID-19 related lockdowns. Few studies, however, have homed in on the day-to-day experiences of teacher educators in par ticular disciplinary specialisms or ‘methods’, or explored how these disciplinary contexts shaped the experience of teaching in the time of COVID-19. This essay presents extended autobiographical accounts of four English teacher educators from different universities on the east coast of Australia, who taught English methods during lockdowns in 2020 and 2021. The study affirms the uniqueness of their experiences, but also recognises four key dimensions of the English teacher educators’ work: relational work; curriculum and pedagogical work; identity work; and professional learning. The study has implications for how English teacher education responds to the challenges of teaching during and beyond the pandemic.uring and beyond the pandemic.
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    Islam, religious minorities, and the challenge of the blasphemy laws: A close look at the current liberal muslim discourse
    Abdi, S ; Platzdasch, B ; Saravanamuttu, J (Cambridge University Press, 2014-01-01)
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    UNDERSTANDING RELIGION-STATE RELATIONS IN MUSLIM SOCIETIES: Beyond Essentialist and Secular-Liberal Narratives
    Abdi, S (Universitas Islam Indonesia (Islamic University of Indonesia), 2017-09)
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    InternationalEd2021: Re-imagining higher education teaching and learning for sustainable internationalisation of curriculum
    Anand, P ; Li, D ; Krautloher, A ; Lui, TKB ; Leung, D (Internationalisation of Curriculum Special Interest Group, 2021)
    COVID-19 has put a spotlight on international education and highlighted the often one-sided view about it. Although there are various educators who value international education for the value it adds to creating diverse, transformative learning experiences, sadly this narrative is often hidden behind the more prominent economic benefits. This Symposium will aim to highlight the importance of internationalisation of the curriculum to develop global citizens for the 21st century. This book proceedings represents a collection of work presented at the InternationalEd2021 symposium held online on 15th October 2021. It highlights the importance of internationalisation of higher education curriculum to develop global citizens for 21st century and beyond.
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    Commentary: The Signal and the Noise-questioning the benefits of puberty blockers for youth with gender dysphoria-a commentary on Rew et al. (2021)
    Clayton, A ; Malone, WJ ; Clarke, P ; Mason, J ; D'Angelo, R (WILEY, 2021-12-22)
    This commentary is a critique of a recent systematic review of the evidence for the use of puberty blockers for youth with gender dysphoria (GD) by Rew et al. (2021). In our view, the review suffers from several methodological oversights including the omission of relevant studies and suboptimal analysis of the quality of the included studies. This has resulted in an incomplete and incorrect assessment of the evidence base for the use of puberty blockers. We find that Rew et al.'s conclusions and clinician recommendations are problematic, especially when discussing suicidality. A key message of the review's abstract appears to be that puberty blockers administered in childhood reduce adult suicidality. However, the study used for the basis of this conclusion (Turban et al., 2020) did not make a causal claim between puberty blockers and decreased adult suicidality. Rather, it reported a negative association between using puberty blockers and lifetime suicidal ideation. The study design did not allow for determination of causation. Our commentary concludes by demonstrating how the GD medical literature, as it moves from one publication to the next, can overstate the evidence underpinning clinical practice recommendations for youth with GD.
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    Dancing with Covid: Choreographing examinations in pandemic times
    Lopez, CA ; Decuypere, M ; Dey, J ; Gorur, R ; Hamilton, M ; Lundahl, C ; Sjodin, ES (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2021-06-08)
    In this paper, we explore the improvisations made in examination practices in higher education during the pandemic of 2020. Drawing on STS, we start from the theoretical assumption that examinations constitute an obligatory passage point in universities and colleges: a sacred point which students need to pass if they want to gain recognized qualifications. We base our analysis of higher education examinations on cases from six countries around the world: Australia, Belgium, Chile, India, Sweden and the UK. We use the analytical heuristic of choreography to follow the movements, tensions and resistance of the ‘emergency examinations’ as well as the re-orderings of actors and stages that have inevitably occurred. In our analytical stories we see the interplay between the maintenance of fixed and sacred aspects of examinations and the fluidity of improvisations aimed at meeting threats of spreading Covid-19. These measures have forced the complex network of examinations both to reinforce some conventional actors and to assemble new actors and stages, thus creating radically new choreographies. Although higher education teaching and didactics are being framed as a playground for pedagogical innovation with digital technologies, it is clear from our data that not all educational activities can be so easily replicated.
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