Arts Collected Works - Research Publications

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    Languages at Work: Defining the Place of Work-Integrated Learning in Language Studies
    Anderson, L ; Are, K ; Benbow, H ; Fornasiero, J ; Reed, SMA ; Amery, R ; Bouvet, E ; Enomoto, K ; Xu, HL (Springer, 2020)
    This chapter makes an argument for the place of Work-Integrated Learning (WIL) in tertiary language studies, with specific reference to the Spanish and German programs at the University of Melbourne. Incorporating WIL into our curricula has enabled us to connect students with local communities and cultural institutions, as well as provide them with work-relevant skills, in particular intercultural competence. Providing students with opportunities to develop work-relevant skills has seen us focus our energies not just on the more advanced-level language subjects where students are clearly suited to placements and internships, but also on beginner- and intermediate-level language subjects. An advantage of this whole-of-curriculum approach is that students understand the contemporary relevance of language study from the outset of their degree. Language study is often seen as something that adds value to another core degree and, as we incorporate WIL into our curriculum, it is our hope that we are able to articulate more clearly the value of language study to our diverse cohort of students.
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    The Capstone Experience: Five principles for a connected curriculum
    Goodwin, M ; Bridgstock, R (Common Ground Publishing, 2019-05-02)
    This paper’s focus is the redesign and re-imagining of a selection of final-year capstone units in the Bachelor of Arts program at the University of Melbourne. We describe the five principles that were our blueprint for reinterpreting the capstone as a sequence of authentic, reflective, creative, celebratory and networked experiences. We view connectedness as having broader social and industrial implications beyond just purely disciplinary knowledge.
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    Breaking out: Rash translations
    Are, K (Double Dialogues, 2018-09-04)
    'Breaking Out' consists of two series of creative works of very different kinds, though of a piece: First, eight mixed-media prints featuring eight found poems that break up and arrange a dialogue between: 1. The English translation of Derrida’s Glas (1974; trans. 1986); 2. A selection of the critical commentary around Glas, which incessantly credits the work with achieving an absolute break with all genre traditions; and3. The Jean Genet essay on which Glas is, in turn, a commentary, ‘What remains of a Rembrandt torn into four equal pieces and flushed down the toilet’ (1958; trans. 1985). In the science of map-making, ‘topography’ denotes a place; ‘chorography’ denotes partial places, elements separated out from but sharing in a topos. From the plateaus, you see how crammed all topos is with a tendency to fragment into parts, and how making a whole is enabled by fragmentation. ‘Chorography’ can also slide slyly into relating to khora, i.e. vis-à-vis Plato vis-à-vis Derrida, the substance that enables all being to spring from Being. If writing has a khora — an elemental potentiality prior to all figuration — it must be breakage. Second, eight narrative poems resulting from a writing strategy that tests unfaithfulness as generative conduct. Derrida’s Glas is already a columned text, but its English-language version is embedded with a further column: the translators have left a fistful of selected terms in the French, enclosing them within square brackets, as though suturing a rift that runs the page from top to bottom. What do the translators’ selections say about Glas? Do they instead say something more interesting about the translators? This was always going to be their bind: you translate and thus stray from the beloved original, or you instead refuse to be unfaithful to the French on this word and that and watch your choices run away with the interpretation that they can’t help but impose on the text. I made up a persona to translate those French terms into story with me – a persona who, like me, spoke little French, and who would, therefore, feel licensed to more carelessly open the square brackets on facing pages 204 and 205. We made from those terms a plateau upon which to fabricate a topos and shapeshifted as required to make it right.
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    Natural Selection: A translation-in-progress of Bestiario (2014) by Beatriz Restrepo
    Are, K ; Restrepo Restrepo, B (Axon: Creative Explorations, 2018-05-01)
    This work uses translation and diagramming as devices in offering an interpretation of Colombian poet Beatriz Restrepo’s 2014 collection Bestiario. The collection indexes sixty animals in sixty poems (a translation of ten poems taken from the collection’s first section are given here), in reference to the medieval Bestiarium Vocabularium, a formative element in the encyclopaedic tradition that permeates the natural sciences. My translation also uses the affordances of visual metaphor to convey my reading of Restrepo’s ‘Bestiary’ as concerned with the mutual nesting of human and non-human animal worlds — with beasts as human inventions, and with human invention as critically shaping animal worlds. Each poem frames a species either in terms of its implication in a human social practice or in terms of its presence in a cultural imaginary — not bees, for instance, but the bees of the novel Pedro Páramo; not albatrosses, but Baudelaire’s ‘Albatross’. Not least among such social practices is the domesticating technology of alphabetisation in the cataloguing of the more-than-human. I have re-ordered Restrepo’s poems to stress this. As images, the translated poems point to the historical use of word and image, equally, as tools in the human organisation of species and inter-species relationships. The poems’ material aspect also correlates the evolution of species with the selective nature of translation, which proceeds by engendering variations that cumulatively deliver the translated text. Creative decisions in the event are granular, manifesting as innumerable points of greater or lesser divergence from the appearance, sound and meaning of an original. Following on from the diagrammatic interpretation are Beatriz’s original poems in Spanish and my more ‘transparent’ translations of them into English. I include these here, imagining that comparison across versions can further elucidate the material poetics of translational and creative process.
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    Touching stories: Objects, writing, diffraction and the ethical hazard of self-reflexivity
    Are, K (Australasian Association of Writing Programs, 2018-10-31)
    This article takes up Donna Haraway’s discussion of ‘diffraction’ as a remedial to the literal self-centredness of the figure of reflection, in order to propose an alternative learning objective for creative writing curricula. There, currently, ‘reflective learning’ is a common if implicit objective, often manifesting in the form of journal-keeping and some kinds of writing exercises, while a capacity for ‘reflection’ can be seen at least bureaucratically to validate the existence per se of university writing programs (Green & Williams 2018). In the educational literature, self-reflexive contemplation of one’s own experiences is said to be preliminary to the achievement of deep, life-long and transformative knowledge (Ryan & Ryan 2012). But, from a posthumanist standpoint, the discourse around reflection in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning appears ideologically committed to a subjectivity that is integral, insular and (thus) humanist, and constitutionally resistant to transformation. Here, I make use of the post-secondary educational literature on ‘object-based learning’ (OBL) to suggest that students’ touching of objects can be conducive to diffractive rather than reflective learning – that is, conducive to learning that avoids the humanist atomisation of subject from object and instead entails establishing one’s interconnectedness with environments. To this end, I propose a way to frame OBL activities as developing a reciprocal relationship between writing subjects and objects of study, in which students situate their writing not as a reflection on/of objects ‘out there’ in the world, but rather as an active and literal co-creation of the self-as-world.
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    The writing body and the reading sensorium: Material calibrations of a living encounter
    Are, K ; Pont, A ; West, P ; Johansen, K ; Atherton, C ; Dredge, R ; Todd, R (Australasian Association of Writing Programs, 2012)
    This paper turns on a concern for that convention that sees the writer dissuaded from imbuing the material dimensions of a piece of writing with meaning – or rather, from disturbing the standardised meaning allotted to these dimensions by the contingencies of a history of print. I’m referring here to literary texts manufactured within a tradition (‘ours’) the particularities of which bar writing from having instilled in its sensually apprehensible form the affective capacity that is instead expected to inhere within writing’s intelligible content. This paper draws attention to the vitality of the surfaces upon which we write and their potential pliability at the hands of the writer in aid of enriching or diversifying a text’s semantic import. In fact, a certain consciousness of the materiality of writing and of its effects, I suggest, constitutes a writerly responsibility, the assumption of which is coextensive with an understanding of what writing is and what it can do. At stake is a singular ethical opportunity, since writing generates an opportunity for encounter with an external other – a union that is ethical insofar as it does not fail to foreground both writer’s and reader’s bodies as individualised and agential sensoria. As practitioners and as educators, to ignore the stuff of writing, I argue, is to insist upon a paradigm that miscalculates the sway of material bodies, reckoning them objects, rather than posthuman assemblages, active agents in the vital matter of life.
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    Assembling bodies: A new materialist approach to writing practice
    Are, K (The Centre for Creative and Cultural Research, University of Canberra, 2015)
    How might some recent philosophical critiques grouped under the rubric of a ‘new materialism’ be brought to bear productively on creative writing practice and pedagogy? This article argues that the new materialism’s particular – and particularly intensified – awareness of the materiality of the writing process and of its textual products can be useful for writers. I consider how the environment in which one creates might look within a new materialist view, outlining what I propose to be one of its central features: the clinamen. I describe how feminist physicist Karen Barad’s concept of intra-activity can be used to view the writing environment as a posthuman assemblage of intra-acting relata, before proposing the figure of the clinamen as able to describe the movement of matter within this assemblage. My argument, ultimately, is that this movement is conducive to the production of novelty in both writing experience and product: it is through the unpredictability of the clinamen’s movement that new textual directions can be brought about. I make reference to my own creative process on this score – taking as examples a collaborative writing workshop I led and an exhibited work of conceptual writing – in order to demonstrate some ways in which new materialisms can prove useful for the proliferation of writing.
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    Sonogrammar: Gertrude Stein and the pulse of writing
    Rozynski, K (Australian Association of Writing Programs, 2013)
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    Spectral bodies of thought: a materialist feminist approach to Conceptual Writing
    ROZYNSKI, K ; Strange, S ; Hetherington, P ; Web, J (Cambridge Scholars P, 2014)