Arts Collected Works - Research Publications

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    Renaissance Translators, Transnational Literature and Intertraffique
    Rizzi, A ; Burdett, C ; Polezzi, L (Liverpool University Press, 2020-06-30)
    The text argues that Italian culture needs to be considered in a transnational/transcultural perspective and that an understanding of linguistic and cultural translation underlies all approaches to the study of Italian culture in a global ...
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    English teacher education in the time of COVID: Australian teacher educators share their experiences
    Bacalja, A ; Parr, G ; McGraw,, K ; Dutton, J ; Diamond, F (Australian Association for the Teaching of English (AATE), 2021-12-01)
    Many studies have repor ted the disruption and anxiety associated with initial teacher education programs across the world lurching in and out of online and remote teaching because of COVID-19 related lockdowns. Few studies, however, have homed in on the day-to-day experiences of teacher educators in par ticular disciplinary specialisms or ‘methods’, or explored how these disciplinary contexts shaped the experience of teaching in the time of COVID-19. This essay presents extended autobiographical accounts of four English teacher educators from different universities on the east coast of Australia, who taught English methods during lockdowns in 2020 and 2021. The study affirms the uniqueness of their experiences, but also recognises four key dimensions of the English teacher educators’ work: relational work; curriculum and pedagogical work; identity work; and professional learning. The study has implications for how English teacher education responds to the challenges of teaching during and beyond the pandemic.uring and beyond the pandemic.
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    InternationalEd2021: Re-imagining higher education teaching and learning for sustainable internationalisation of curriculum
    Anand, P ; Li, D ; Krautloher, A ; Lui, TKB ; Leung, D (Internationalisation of Curriculum Special Interest Group, 2021)
    COVID-19 has put a spotlight on international education and highlighted the often one-sided view about it. Although there are various educators who value international education for the value it adds to creating diverse, transformative learning experiences, sadly this narrative is often hidden behind the more prominent economic benefits. This Symposium will aim to highlight the importance of internationalisation of the curriculum to develop global citizens for the 21st century. This book proceedings represents a collection of work presented at the InternationalEd2021 symposium held online on 15th October 2021. It highlights the importance of internationalisation of higher education curriculum to develop global citizens for 21st century and beyond.
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    Commentary: The Signal and the Noise-questioning the benefits of puberty blockers for youth with gender dysphoria-a commentary on Rew et al. (2021)
    Clayton, A ; Malone, WJ ; Clarke, P ; Mason, J ; D'Angelo, R (WILEY, 2021-12-22)
    This commentary is a critique of a recent systematic review of the evidence for the use of puberty blockers for youth with gender dysphoria (GD) by Rew et al. (2021). In our view, the review suffers from several methodological oversights including the omission of relevant studies and suboptimal analysis of the quality of the included studies. This has resulted in an incomplete and incorrect assessment of the evidence base for the use of puberty blockers. We find that Rew et al.'s conclusions and clinician recommendations are problematic, especially when discussing suicidality. A key message of the review's abstract appears to be that puberty blockers administered in childhood reduce adult suicidality. However, the study used for the basis of this conclusion (Turban et al., 2020) did not make a causal claim between puberty blockers and decreased adult suicidality. Rather, it reported a negative association between using puberty blockers and lifetime suicidal ideation. The study design did not allow for determination of causation. Our commentary concludes by demonstrating how the GD medical literature, as it moves from one publication to the next, can overstate the evidence underpinning clinical practice recommendations for youth with GD.
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    Dancing with Covid: Choreographing examinations in pandemic times
    Lopez, CA ; Decuypere, M ; Dey, J ; Gorur, R ; Hamilton, M ; Lundahl, C ; Sjodin, ES (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2021-06-08)
    In this paper, we explore the improvisations made in examination practices in higher education during the pandemic of 2020. Drawing on STS, we start from the theoretical assumption that examinations constitute an obligatory passage point in universities and colleges: a sacred point which students need to pass if they want to gain recognized qualifications. We base our analysis of higher education examinations on cases from six countries around the world: Australia, Belgium, Chile, India, Sweden and the UK. We use the analytical heuristic of choreography to follow the movements, tensions and resistance of the ‘emergency examinations’ as well as the re-orderings of actors and stages that have inevitably occurred. In our analytical stories we see the interplay between the maintenance of fixed and sacred aspects of examinations and the fluidity of improvisations aimed at meeting threats of spreading Covid-19. These measures have forced the complex network of examinations both to reinforce some conventional actors and to assemble new actors and stages, thus creating radically new choreographies. Although higher education teaching and didactics are being framed as a playground for pedagogical innovation with digital technologies, it is clear from our data that not all educational activities can be so easily replicated.
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    Access versus integration: the benevolent undermining of an Indian desegregation policy
    Dey, J ; Gilbertson, A (Routledge, 2021)
    Efforts to desegregate schools have consistently been undermined by privileged parents finding ways to avoid undesirable schools. In some contexts, a more complex picture is emerging, where ‘progressive’ privileged parents choose ‘diverse’ schools but still reproduce segregation. We demonstrate how the desegregation aims of an Indian education policy are similarly undermined by seemingly well-intentioned privileged actors. India’s Right to Education Act of 2009 requires private schools to educate disadvantaged children for free. The architects of this policy imagined that it would not only provide access to quality education for disadvantaged children, but also desegregate schools. Beneficiaries of the policy share the policymakers’ vision of desegregation. However, various elite and middle-class actors prioritise access over integration, and assert that segregated classrooms may be in the best interests of underprivileged children. This highlights how desegregation policies can fail not just as a result of direct opposition but also through discourses of benevolence.
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    Encountering a Pedagogy of the World in a University Setting
    Healy, S ; Coleman, K ; Johnson Sallis, R ; Belton, A ; Bright, D ; Heffernan, A ; Riddle, S (Routledge, 2021)
    Taking up Biesta's (2019) notion of a pedagogy of the world, we ask: How might participating in an arts-based educational program with/in a university enable young people from schools with low Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) values to encounter the world of higher education differently and become different in that encounter? This chapter comes from our engagement with empirical material generated during a (post)qualitative inquiry into the pedagogy of The Art of Engagement—a multi-arts studio program involving relational pedagogy and a/r/tography as curriculum located in SPACE, 1 whereby secondary school students from schools in less socio-educationally advantaged communities came together with undergraduate university students for a five-day intensive within a University of Melbourne breadth subject. The program's rationale was to connect with secondary school arts students completing their schooling in lower ICSEA value schools 2 through the design of authentic university encounters with/in site, practices and communities. It welcomed the secondary school students into the world of our university and enhanced their capacity to “be at home” in this world, creating the conditions for considering and potentially living different post-school futures.
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    Anthropocene Disease and the Undead in V Wars
    Dungan, S (Aeternum, 2021)
    This article discusses the recent television series V Wars (2019) that has had little academic attention to date. In V Wars, vampirism is a virus released into earth systems because of glacial deterioration due to global warming. This outbreak turns (some) humans into vampires, culminating in a species war that pits surviving humans against vampires. Focussing on the series’ unique representation of the spread of vampirism around ice melt, this article argues that V Wars’ vampires are distinctly ecological in nature. Drawing on Priscilla Wald’s theorisation of the outbreak narrative, this article argues V Wars’ representation of the vampire as a spreader of disease demonstrates the close link between human disruption of the Anthropocene and public health, since exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic, while also illustrating intricate and inextricable entanglements between humans and myriad earth others from which crisis can stem. As a vector of contagion, the vampire in V Wars promotes an understanding of Nature and potential virus-related disasters that lie in wait if humankind does not adopt better environmental practices, pertinent for our current era of pandemics, extinctions, ecological collapse and beyond. V Wars thus illustrates the need to cultivate better, more conscious relations with earth systems and nonhuman others—measures necessary to mitigate and manage the emergence of future Anthropocene disease.
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    Vegetarian vampires of the Anthropocene: Re-reading the animal blood diet in Stephenie Meyer's Twilight Saga
    Dungan, S (Monash University, 2020-12-04)
    This article discusses Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Saga (2005- 8) against the backdrop of the Anthropocene and takes as its focus the depiction of vampires who choose to consume animal blood, instead of human blood. This article argues that we can read Meyer’s formulation of a so-called vampiric vegetarian diet as inflecting the concerns of a modern vegetarian diet, which stem from our ecological era. In the saga's portrayal of a vampiric vegetarian diet, this article finds a model for engaging with nonhuman species and the environment, that is necessary if we are to survive the Anthropocene.