Arts Collected Works - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 12
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Encountering a Pedagogy of the World in a University Setting
    Healy, S ; Coleman, K ; Johnson Sallis, R ; Belton, A ; Bright, D ; Heffernan, A ; Riddle, S (Routledge, 2021)
    Taking up Biesta's (2019) notion of a pedagogy of the world, we ask: How might participating in an arts-based educational program with/in a university enable young people from schools with low Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) values to encounter the world of higher education differently and become different in that encounter? This chapter comes from our engagement with empirical material generated during a (post)qualitative inquiry into the pedagogy of The Art of Engagement—a multi-arts studio program involving relational pedagogy and a/r/tography as curriculum located in SPACE, 1 whereby secondary school students from schools in less socio-educationally advantaged communities came together with undergraduate university students for a five-day intensive within a University of Melbourne breadth subject. The program's rationale was to connect with secondary school arts students completing their schooling in lower ICSEA value schools 2 through the design of authentic university encounters with/in site, practices and communities. It welcomed the secondary school students into the world of our university and enhanced their capacity to “be at home” in this world, creating the conditions for considering and potentially living different post-school futures.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Be Here, Be Heard: Enabling and Representing Student Voice and Agency,
    Rahman, N ; Rider, C ; Aayeshah, W ; Bell, PA (Student Voice Australia, 2021)
    Be Here, Be Heard (BHBH) is an on-going student voice and agency project embedded within the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne. This project recognises that student engagement sits within a broader transformative learning pedagogical context. This initiative builds on and extends the experiential nature of student engagement and representation of student voice.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Bilingualism
    Wigglesworth, G ; O’Shannessy, C ; Mohebbi, H ; Coombe, C (Springer International Publishing, 2021)
    Even though more people in the world are bilingual than monolingual, bilingualism remains one of the least-well understood areas of human language development and use. Approaches to studying bilingualism are varied, but tend to fall into either social-interactional aspects of language-in-use, including discourse analysis, or psycholinguistic aspects, e.g. models of speech production, lexical retrieval and storage, sentence interpretation and linguistic interaction.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Languages at Work: Defining the Place of Work-Integrated Learning in Language Studies
    Anderson, L ; Are, K ; Benbow, H ; Fornasiero, J ; Reed, SMA ; Amery, R ; Bouvet, E ; Enomoto, K ; Xu, HL (Springer, 2020)
    This chapter makes an argument for the place of Work-Integrated Learning (WIL) in tertiary language studies, with specific reference to the Spanish and German programs at the University of Melbourne. Incorporating WIL into our curricula has enabled us to connect students with local communities and cultural institutions, as well as provide them with work-relevant skills, in particular intercultural competence. Providing students with opportunities to develop work-relevant skills has seen us focus our energies not just on the more advanced-level language subjects where students are clearly suited to placements and internships, but also on beginner- and intermediate-level language subjects. An advantage of this whole-of-curriculum approach is that students understand the contemporary relevance of language study from the outset of their degree. Language study is often seen as something that adds value to another core degree and, as we incorporate WIL into our curriculum, it is our hope that we are able to articulate more clearly the value of language study to our diverse cohort of students.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Who is the self in Indigenous self‑determination?
    Nakata, S ; Rowse, T ; Rademaker, L (ANU Press, 2020)
    Yet, the defining features of this era, as well as how, why and when it ended, are far from clear. In this collection we ask: how shall we write the history of self-determination?
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Public Interest and Private Passion: Ken Inglis on the ABC
    Davis, G ; Browne, P ; Spark, S (Monash University Publishing, 2020)
    Background • Broadcasting in Australia • A reflection on the central contribution of Ken Inglis through his two volumes on the ABC • To trace the origins of the project, interview the author, and reflect on the impact Research Contribution • A great historian such as Ken Inglis, showing patience and deep archival research, can produce an important and enduring history of a major public institution Significance • The chapter is part of a Festschrift for Professor Inglis, who kindly agreed to be interviewed as part of the writing. It was presented in his presence at a conference held at Monash University, and then revised and updated after his death in December 2017.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    La conversation, métaphore de l’approche narrative du counseling d’orientation
    McIlveen, P ; Creed, A ; Masdonati, J ; Massoudi, K ; Rossier, J (Antipodes in Actualités Psychologiques Collection, 2020)
    Metaphor is writ large in everyday life. In their landmark publication, Metaphors We Life By, Lakoff and Johnson (1980) argue that human cognition is constituted by language and is replete with metaphor. Indeed, thinking, speaking, gesturing, is structured by metaphorical concepts making communication near impossible without using metaphor. Metaphor abound in the language of career (Inkson, 2004). Counsellors and clients talk about bridges, ladders, cycles, stages, patterns, journeys, and stories to collaboratively make meaningful sense of the concept of career. It is impossible to create shared meaning in counselling without using metaphor to understand, deconstruct, and reconstruct ideas about career—without being on the same page, so to speak. If one accepts a radical social constructionist paradigm of personal identity as a derivation of discourse (Gergen, 1991; McAdams, 1993; Polkinghorne, 1988; Sarbin, 1986) and a dialogical theory of self (Hermans, 2006; Hermans & Gieser, 2012) and career (McIlveen & Patton, 2007) then it follows that dialogue between counsellor and client is both the process of meaning-making and substance of meaning (McIlveen, 2012, 2017). Thus, we articulate career counselling in the metaphorical frame of dialogue and conceptualise career counselling as conversations between counsellor and client. First, we overview the progenitor theory and practice of narrative career counselling which is extended to the conversation metaphor model. Second, we describe the centrality of the working alliance in career counselling, for it is in the client-counsellor relationship that dialogue and metaphor abound. Third, we introduce theory of metaphor that explicates conversation in and as counselling. Fourth, we present a method of narrative career counselling that exemplifies theoretical principles. Finally, we intend to critically arouse narrative career counselling and call for an explication of its philosophy and research into its effectiveness.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Resistance: disrupt the information flow
    Goodwin, M ; Nash, E ; Goodwin, M (Gallery Services, Townsville City Council, 2015-12-18)
    If art is a political act, then media art is a technologically enabled one. How can screen based media embody the notion of resistance? What is it that we see when we peer out of the virtual panopticon of our contemporary cities, shopping malls, office blocks and vessels of transportation with our networked devices of communication? Indeed by making art we are conducting an act of resistance. We are subverting accepted norms, we are stepping outside of the media stream – or directly in front of it – and making a calculated statement. Through media interventions we can point toward alternative pathways, expose bias and stand apart from the common binary politics of our times. As Graham Harman notes, “As philosophers, we're not supposed to be swept along with the Zeitgeist, we’re supposed to be resisting it.” We resist political rhetoric by asking questions of language, of history and of context. We resist surveillance by pointing the camera back at the watchers. We resist the recurring bile of racism, sexism and bigotry by subverting stereotypes by creating new forms of beauty and a more interconnected sense of identity. We resist the predatory nature of capital and the upward linearity of growth and accumulation by challenging notions of value and currency with alternative definitions of wealth and new expressions of personal freedom. For Screenrab7 all forms of resistance will be considered: the politics of resistance, the physics of resistance, the messiness of resistance, and the urgency of resistance. In this age of contradiction – and as Bruce Sterling has observed, of “favela chic and gothic high-tech” – it is the duality of our relationship to the forces of order and control that is under examination here. We resist, not as some might have it – to impede or to destroy the status quo – indeed, that would be too obvious, too easy, and too predictable. Resistance through art making, through creative expression, is subtler and more nuanced than that. The act of resistance in art, as in life, is to demand a more complex, empathetic and interconnected human experience.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Velocity: change / at speed / everywhere
    Goodwin, M ; Nash, E ; Goodwin, M (Gallery Services, Townsville City Council, 2014-09-20)
    The rushing up of the Earth from below as we leap into the unknown is a strong pervasive force. The comings and goings of objects, the rhizomatic fever of life - of memories and of perception - is the stuff of both nature and the machine but also the stuff of change - of a compelling need to move forward, at pace. Since the millennium we have been moving away in linear time from the trauma of the 20th century, history accumulating behind us as we hurtle towards an undefined future. Yet there also seems to be a reductive velocity at work, the future appears to be expanding only in our mind’s eye - in the stories we tell ourselves, in the frames of the cinematic moment and the pixels of our most fantastic dreaming. If we stand still long enough the hyper-reality becomes apparent. Information is expanding at an exponential rate – images, sound and text – authoring a new present-future space of mobility, of interconnectedness and most of all of rapid accelerating change. Equal parts chaos and perfection – of truth and of fiction - a dark and light exposure. It is the making of us, this velocity of things. It is both our return to Earth and our mastery of its physics. Our identity and our collective history is fast becoming a vast data repository of machine vision - a rapid prototyping of our future selves. Financial transactions, personal communications, intimate moments exist inside this simulation of machine speed. Artificial intelligence observes, correlates, measures and makes split second decisions on our behalf. Notions of surveillance, fears for our privacy, the dilution of our identity and the voyeuristic connotations of relational databases make up the machine’s vision of us and our world. Can we keep apace of these algorithmic patterns? Can we author new vistas, new dreamscapes, new directions? Meanwhile, history keeps up a steady persistent pace: the image loops, the cogs turn, the velocity increases, and the hyper-real maintains its seductive play.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Capstone Experience: Five principles for a connected curriculum
    Goodwin, M ; Bridgstock, R (Common Ground Publishing, 2019-05-02)
    This paper’s focus is the redesign and re-imagining of a selection of final-year capstone units in the Bachelor of Arts program at the University of Melbourne. We describe the five principles that were our blueprint for reinterpreting the capstone as a sequence of authentic, reflective, creative, celebratory and networked experiences. We view connectedness as having broader social and industrial implications beyond just purely disciplinary knowledge.