Arts Collected Works - Research Publications

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    Indigenous knowledge is not an extractable resource
    Thomas, A (Academia.edu, 2021-11)
    Indigenous knowledge is increasingly being looked to as containing solutions to contemporary challenges, particularly climate change. Along with growing anxieties about the future of the planet is a parallel “tendency to exalt Indigenous or non-Western others as symbols of inspirational environmental ethics, modelling interspecies, interconnectedness and reciprocity contrary to a Western will-to-destruction” (Neale & Vincent, 2017, 426). Recent calls to harness Indigenous bushfire management techniques in Australia and growing interest in Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) in land and resource management globally are examples of this trend and represent important steps forward in improved recognition of Indigenous peoples. However, reaching for Indigenous knowledge when western knowledge and systems fail is to treat it as a gap-filler or additive (Starblanket & Stark, 2018, 170). While recognition is good and conversations around partnering with First peoples to resolve macro-problems are a step in the right direction, Indigenous knowledge cannot be treated as an extractable resource to be managed and used apart from the place, people and culture that generated it.
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    Communication access: AAC in personal and public spaces
    Tomlin, B ; Burn, G ; McVilly, K ; Johnson, H ; Rachele, J ; West, D ; Lyon, K ; Slater, S (Unterstützte Kommunikation, 2022)
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    Interest convergence in the Land of the Cosmic Race:Mexican anti-racism and the motivation question
    Rejon, R (Taylor and Francis Group, 2024-01-04)
    Recent contributions to the academic literature describe Mexican racism as structural: an unintended blameless outcome of the combined actions of many individuals and institutions. This conceptualization appears to hamstring individual motivation for collective action: who is responsible for redressing the injustice and why? In this paper, I appeal to interest convergence – a key tenet of Critical Race Theory – to argue that Mexican anti-racism could gain from strategically identifying and communicating “shared predicaments” with the beneficiaries of racial injustice. Employing Grounded Normative Theory as a methodological approach and examining empirical research through [Jackson, Taharee. 2011. “Which Interests Are Served by the Principle of Interest Convergence? Whiteness, Collective Trauma, and the Case for Anti-racism.” Race Ethnicity and Education 14 (4): 435–459] “disaggregation” of interest, I find hints of moral, psychological – even emotional and material – interest convergence between beneficiaries and victims of racial injustice in Mexico. I conclude that the contextual and erratic nature of Mexican racism could be strategically harnessed to produce social reform and advance racial equality.
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    Samoa’s New Labour Trade
    Fatupaito, A ; Utuva, L ; Tauave, S ; Alofipo, A ; Meleisea, M ; Schoeffel, O ; Arthur, T ; Alexeyeff, K (Centre for Samoan Studies, National University of Samoa, 2021)
    This article explores the context of aspirations to become seasonal workers in New Zealand or Australia and the experiences of those who worked in New Zealand under the Recognized Seasonal Employer scheme. It is based on detailed interviews with 24 people who were seasonal workers or who aspired to become seasonal workers in 2020, and on other relevant sources. The focus of the article is the recruitment processes and the economic, social and historical contexts of seasonal work in Samoa.
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    Whose Paradise? Encounter, Exchange, and Exploitation
    Alexeyeff, K ; McDonnell, S (UNIV HAWAII PRESS, 2018)
    This essay is a critical reexamination of the trope of paradise. This trope has a long global history encompassing colonial imaginings and missionary and travel narratives, and notions of “paradise” continue to influence contemporary narratives of place and landscape in the Pacific for Indigenous groups and others. While much has been written about the potency of the paradise trope in the West, it is often implicitly assumed that Indigenous engagement with the trope amounts to a simple rejection or dismissal of “paradise.” In contrast, we suggest that the dynamics of possession, dispossession, and repossession of paradise require further investigation. Paradise is both an imaginary that frames foreign engagement with the Pacific and a complex political landscape that is mobilized by Indigenous people both to contest neocolonial forms of appropriation and exploitation and to affirm local articulations of ownership and belonging in the Pacific.
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    Cinderella of the south seas? Virtuous victims, empowerment and other fables of development feminism
    Alexeyeff, K (Elsevier, 2020-05-01)
    The developmental logic underpinning ‘Cinderella projects,’ in which women of the Global South are targeted for interventions intended to tap and expand their unrecognized economic and entrepreneurial potential. This version of ‘development feminism,’ constructs its female objects as both impoverished victim-subjects and as nascent market-oriented actors. Moreover, development feminist discourse, grounded as it is in seemingly universal ideas of women’s oppression, equality and economic participation, generates paradoxical effects in different social contexts. Drawing on ethnographic examples from Polynesia, the paper illustrates how a homogeneous concept of ‘woman’ makes little sense because local gender categories are complexly intersected by age, socio-economic status as well as by hereditary rank. As a result, development feminisms’ gender interventions transform local individual subjectivities in novel and often unexpected ways, producing new forms of inequality while obscuring others.
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    En las fronteras del género: política y transformaciones de la no-heteronormatividad en Polinesia = Gender on the edge: The politics and transformations of non-heteronormativity in Polynesia
    Besnier, N ; ALEXEYEFF, K (Universidad de Murcia, 2016-11-01)
    En las sociedades polinesias, las personas con un género o sexualidad no-heteronormativos ocupan, a un mismo tiempo, posiciones marginales y lugares centrales en la estructura social: forman una categoría social extremadamente visible, pero cuyas fronteras son a la vez borrosas. Esta duplicidad nos insta a pasar desde una aproximación que pretende aislarlos en tanto categoría identitaria a otra aproximación que se centra en las prácticas sociales, culturales y políticas. Esta aproximación comienza con la historia de los contactos entre Isleños y Occidentales, una historia que parece haber cumplido un papel central en la emergencia social de la no-heteronormatividad en la región. Rechazando los modelos simplistas que enfrentan “tradición” y “modernidad” para abrazar en su lugar la complejidad de estas categorías, pretendemos localizar la no- heteronormatividad polinesia en la convergencia de fuerzas locales y globales y en los intersticios entre moralidades diferentes que, sin embargo, funcionan simultáneamente.
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    Art as intervention: Protests on urban transformation in China and Australia
    Xiao, J ; Lu, IF (Informa UK Limited, 2022-05-28)
    Participation in public space is widely recognized as a means for deepening social inclusion. Recent developments in urban participation have seen an intertwining relationship between art, technology, and activism. This article presents a comparative study of two protests regarding the transformation of two public spaces: Donghu in Wuhan, China, and Federation Square in Melbourne, Australia. We aim to compare and contrast how art functions in the processes and results of the protests in each country’s socio-political contexts. Both possessing artistic and activist components, the Donghu protest played out as a disguised form of occupation that failed eventually. The case of Federation Square engaged with both artist activism and direct political engagement that ended in triumph for the activists. In both cases, art was mobilized to mediate a broader range of communications and prompt social change. The latter case took a relatively elitist approach than the former by relying on informed activists and working within a liberal democratic framework. Nonetheless, both protests showcase public agency and subjectivity despite different socio-political contexts. This paper argues that analyzing the role of art in urban protests can provide new insights into the esthetic modes of resistance in conflicts over the transformation of urban space.
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    Editorial: risk of gastric and duodenal ulcers among new users of low-dose aspirin
    Yeomans, ND (WILEY, 2022-07)
    LINKED CONTENT This article is linked to Nguyen et al papers. To view these articles, visit https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.17050
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    Yusuf al-Qaradawi’s Jurisprudence of Priorities
    Hassan, M (International Institute of Islamic Thought, )
    According to Yusuf al-Qaradawi – a prominent Muslim jurist of the contemporary period, the jurisprudence of priorities is intended to mitigate excess and negligence in legal reasoning. This article examines the fundamental principles of the jurisprudence of priorities as propounded by Yusuf al-Qaradawi in relation to the foundational sources of Islamic law. The purpose of this article is to dissect the constituent legal principles of the jurisprudence of priorities and critically evaluate their validity and coherence against the textual and rational evidences of Islamic law. This article argues that the fundamental principles of the jurisprudence of priorities are validated in the sources of Islamic law, and do facilitate the mitigation of excess and negligence in legal reasoning.