School of Languages and Linguistics - Research Publications

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    The use of translation in international organizations
    Pym, A ; Kittel, H ; Frank, AP ; Greiner, N ; Hermans, T ; Koller, W ; Lambert, J ; Paul, F (WALTER DE GRUYTER & CO, 2004-01-01)
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    Translation Studies Should Help Solve Social Problems
    Pym, A ; Androulakis, G (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 2003)
    It is proposed that the main tasks of Translation Studies should be to help solve certain social problems. This may provide a model of interdisciplinarity where the definition of problems precedes and orients the many disciplines that may be used to solve them. It is suggested that suitable problems may be recognized in terms of three ethical criteria: 1) the possible solutions should concern linguistic mediation, 2) the aim should be to promote cooperation between cultures, and 3) the problems should proceed from social disagreements. It is hoped that application of these criteria will protect the interdiscipline from excessive instrumentalization.
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    Alternatives to borders in translation theory
    Pym, A ; Petrilli, S (Rodopi, 2003)
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    Translators as breakers of norms?
    Pym, A ; Delisle, J ; Woodsworth, J (John Benjamins, 1995)
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    Translation Error Analysis and the Interface with Language Teaching
    Pym, A ; Dollerup, C ; Loddegaard, A (John Benjamins, 1992)
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    Histoires vraies
    Pym, A ; Grivel, C (Noesis Foundation, 1988)
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    Qüestionement de la traducció del mite
    Pym, A ; Pym, A (Noesis Foundation, 1990)
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    Conceptual tools in translation history
    Pym, A ; Rundle, C (Routledge, 2021)
    Western translation historiography has developed a set of conceptual tools with which to talk about translations in terms of separate languages, cultures, and texts, with operational maxims for distinguishing translations from non-translations, and translators from authors. Those concepts assume a foundational binarism that became strong in the early modern period in Europe and may be described as the Western translation form. They then moved outwards from Europe, first as a fellow travelertraveller of modernity, and later with the spread of Western translation studies. Translation historians have, nevertheless, become increasingly aware of alternative translation forms that consistently challenge the Western concepts. Here, it is proposed that the wider plurality might be embraced by honing conceptual tools that, for example, do not systematically separate orality and iconic communication from the written text,; that recognize the ways translators seek trust, collaboration, and inclusion in diverse intercultures,; and that work from technologies as the driving forces of translation history. In developing such concepts, translation historians should further recognize that they are responding to the priorities of the present, in a world where electronic media are revealing the historicity of truths once thought eternal.
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    West enters East. A strange case of unequal equivalences in Soviet translation theory
    Pym, A ; Ayvazyan, N ; Schippel, L ; Zwischenberger, C (Frank & Timme, 2016)
    Translation Studies developed on both sides of the Cold War with a remarkable lack of comparative perspectives, often as two separate hubs. Soviet thinking about translation was nevertheless influenced by Western theories in the mid 1970s, generally coinciding with renewed promises from machine translation and a thaw in Cold War relations. The Soviet discourse of “exactitude” and “adequacy” was thus put into contact with a recent Western discourse based on “transformation” and “equivalence”. Evidence of this can be seen in the history of the term “equivalence”, which prior to the 1970s broadly implied one-to-one correspondence, and yet after the 1970s was more generally understood as the textual result, on whatever level, of linguistic transformation.