School of Languages and Linguistics - Research Publications

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    Constructive Case: Evidence from Australian Languages
    Nordlinger, R (CSLI Publications, 1998-01-01)
    Australian Aboriginal languages have many interesting grammatical characteristics that challenge some of the central assumptions of current linguistic theory. These languages exhibit many unusual morphosyntactic characteristics that have not yet been adequately incorporated into current linguistic theory. This volume focuses on the complex properties of case morphology in these nonconfigurational languages, including extensive case stacking and the use of case to mark tense/aspect/mood. While problematic for many syntactic approaches, these case properties are given a natural and unified account in the lexicalist model of constructive case developed in this book, which allows case morphology to construct the larger syntactic context independently of phrase structure.
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    [Review of the book] Sex, Sea, and Self: Sexuality and Nationalism in French Caribbean Discourses, 1924–1948, by Jacqueline Couti
    Wimbush, A (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2022-10-12)
    In her fascinating new monograph, Jacqueline Couti examines how black writers from Guadeloupe and Martinique, writing between 1924 and 1948, both critiqued and also tapped into a set of colonial tropes about Caribbean subjects.
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    [Review of the book] From Menstruation to the Menopause: The Female Fertility Cycle in Contemporary Women's Writing in French, by Maria Tomlinson
    Wimbush, A (Project MUSE, 2022)
    Maria Tomlinson's compelling new book, From Menstruation to the Menopause: The Female Fertility Cycle in Contemporary Women's Writing in French, examines how menstruation, childbirth, and the menopause are represented in a range of contemporary fictional works by women writers from France, Algeria, and Mauritius.
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    Transgressing Literary Norms in Véronique Tadjo’s En compagnie des hommes
    Wimbush, A ; Kačkutė, E ; Averis, K ; Mao, C (Brill, 2020-07-01)
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    Resistance and Rebellion in Gisèle Pineau’s Paroles de terre en larmes
    Wimbush, A ; Connell, L ; Gras, D (Lexington Books, 2022-10)
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    Introduction: Postcolonial realms of memory in the francophone world
    Lewis, J ; Wimbush, A (Liverpool University Press, 2016-01-06)
    In September 2020, the mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, announced plans to unveil a statute of Solitude, a former slave who fought against the French reinstatement of slavery in Guadeloupe in 1802. Solitude was arrested during the revolt, sentenced to death, and hanged. The inauguration of a statue in her memory would constitute the first statue of a black woman to be put up in the French capital.
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    ‘L’Identité antillaise de Frantz Fanon, selon Raphaël Confiant’
    Wimbush, A (Presses universitaires des Antilles, 2021-01-04)
    This article will examine the dual Antillean-Algerian identity of Frantz Fanon, as imagined by Raphaël Confiant in L’Insurrection de l’âme : Frantz Fanon, vie et mort du guerrier-silex (2017). Confiant describes the text as an imagined autobiography of Fanon because it combines a third-person, factual account of Fanon’s career as a psychiatrist in Algeria with more personal reflections about his Antillean childhood, recounted from the perspective of the imagined ‘I’. In the text Confiant emphasizes Fanon’s role in the Antillean resistance, an underexplored episode of Fanon’s life which nevertheless was crucial in the formation of his anticolonial thought. The article will analyse the literary techniques Confiant uses to highlight Fanon’s great sacrifice, while also arguing that the text is a salient example of the concept of ‘nœuds de mémoire’ by Debarati Sanyal, Max Silverman and Michael Rothberg. The Caribbean and Algerian memories of Fanon’s life and work do not compete with each other; rather, they complement each other.
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    Madness, Isolation and the Female Condition in Gisele Pineau's Writing
    Wimbush, A (Liverpool University Press, 2022)
    This article examines themes of madness and mental illness in fictional and non-fictional writing by Guadeloupean author Gisèle Pineau. Madness is an important trope in French Caribbean literature that critiques the enduring legacies of colonization, slavery and forced displacement. It is a prevalent theme in Pineau’s work because her writing is inspired by her parallel career as a psychiatric nurse. The article explores madness from a gendered perspective in her short stories “Ombres créoles” (1988) and “Ta mission, Marny” (2009). Arguing that here, madness is a specifically Antillean condition that both erases the agency of the female protagonists and grants them power to resist, the article then examines how Pineau explores the theme from a metropolitan viewpoint in the autobiographically inspired Folie, aller simple: journée ordinaire d’une infirmière (2010). Through her writing, Pineau bears witness to the ordeals of Caribbean women haunted by the collective trauma of slavery and patriarchal power.