School of Languages and Linguistics - Research Publications

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    An LFG approach to Icelandic reciprocal constructions
    Hurst, P ; Nordlinger, R ; Arka, IW ; Asudeh, A ; Holloway King, T (Oxford University Press, 2021)
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    Historical Pedagogy and the Lute: Education to Match Aspirations
    Griffiths, J ; Griffiths, J ; Wirth, S (Deutsche Lautengesellschaft and Lute Society of America, 2021-11-11)
    Explores the history of institutional lute learning in Europe since 1900; explores the nineteenth-century pedagogy used in conservatorium and university practical tuition and its limitations for teaching early music, and presents an alternate pedagogical methodology based on sixteenth-century Spanish theorist Juan Bermudo.
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    Virtual Exchanges and Gender-Inclusive Toponymy: An Intercultural Citizenship Project to Foster Equality
    Calamita, F ; Trape, R ; Carloni, G ; Virga, A ; Zuccala, B (Edizioni Ca’ Foscari - Digital Publishing, 2021)
    This paper focuses on a virtual exchange project between the University of Virginia, United States, and an upper-secondary school in Pavia, Italy. Centred on the question of gender equality, the project has been designed to take place over three years (2018-21), and with direct reference to the transnational model of virtual exchange for global citizenship education proposed in 2019 by Robert O’Dowd. As an integrated part of the language learning curriculum, the project creates a virtual space which parallels the space-time of traditional class tuition, and which students can inhabit with a significant degree of autonomy. The project aims to foster gender equality and help students to reflect on the sociocultural evolution of the language and how it can be used to address issues of identity, diversity and inclusion.
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    Conceptual tools in translation history
    Pym, A ; Rundle, C (Routledge, 2021)
    Western translation historiography has developed a set of conceptual tools with which to talk about translations in terms of separate languages, cultures, and texts, with operational maxims for distinguishing translations from non-translations, and translators from authors. Those concepts assume a foundational binarism that became strong in the early modern period in Europe and may be described as the Western translation form. They then moved outwards from Europe, first as a fellow travelertraveller of modernity, and later with the spread of Western translation studies. Translation historians have, nevertheless, become increasingly aware of alternative translation forms that consistently challenge the Western concepts. Here, it is proposed that the wider plurality might be embraced by honing conceptual tools that, for example, do not systematically separate orality and iconic communication from the written text,; that recognize the ways translators seek trust, collaboration, and inclusion in diverse intercultures,; and that work from technologies as the driving forces of translation history. In developing such concepts, translation historians should further recognize that they are responding to the priorities of the present, in a world where electronic media are revealing the historicity of truths once thought eternal.
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    The production of autarkic subjectivities: Food discourse in Franco’s Spain (1939–59)
    Anderson, L ; del Arco Blanco, M ; ANDERSON, P (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2021-10-07)
    This chapter looks at the role played by food discourse in the production of autarkic subjectivities in Franco’s Spain (1939–59), in particular how it taught readers the ‘right’ approach to food in Spain’s post-war economy. If notions of self-sacrifice and a belief in Spain’s capacity to feed its own people were central to autarky, so too was a ‘taste’ for indigenous foodstuffs. Official food discourse produced readers or citizens with such tastes while also giving them a daily experience of themselves as autarkic subjectivities. Another way in which official discourse sustained autarky was through what I label ‘gastronomic patriotism’, or ‘gastronomic xenophobia’. Given that autarky was part of a broader desire to seal Spain off from outside influence, it follows that official food discourse produced a gastronomic map of Spain that was proudly free from external influence. This notion of Spanish food culture as pure or closed off from ‘corrupting’ foreign influence impacts not just on the contours of Spanish gastronomy, but also on individual subjectivity as Spaniards come to define themselves in these terms, too.
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    Language Education in Australian Primary Schools: Policy, Practice, Perceptions
    Mason, S ; Hajek, J ; Lanvers, U ; Thompson, AS ; East, M (Springer International Publishing, 2021)
    Despite considerable policy attention to language education in schools over several decades, the rate of students who continue studying a language in Australia post any compulsory period has remained low in comparison with other nations. Most language programmes begin during students’ primary school years, and as this is often the first experience of language learning for many monolingual Australian students, it is an important sector for investigation, particularly as most attention is placed on the secondary sector. This chapter provides an illustration and analysis of the state and nature of language education in Australian primary schools from three interconnected perspectives. First, we provide a detailed overview of the policies and programmes that have impacted primary school education in Australia. Next, we discuss the implementation of language teaching and learning at the classroom level, also drawing on research in the field to elicit the main challenges faced by students and teachers in modern classrooms. Finally, we discuss the public perceptions of the role and state of language education in the sector, particularly drawing on our recent studies of the representation of the discipline in the Australian press.
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    Digital corpora - language teaching and learning in the age of big data
    Absalom, M ; Beaven, T ; Rosell-Aguilar, F (Research-Publishing., 2021-03-01)
    What is it? Using corpora to teach languages is nothing new and, while the term corpus linguistics hails from the 1940s, most language learning before the 20th century adopted a corpus approach – using a series of texts in the language under study as a type of corpus on which to base acquisition. With the advent of widespread computing in the latter half of the 20th century, corpora began to be digitised, rendering interrogation of large amounts of data a much simpler and more appealing prospect. Today, languages in all forms (written, spoken, performed, formal, informal, etc.) are captured all the time through online and digital platforms, apps, etc. meaning that the wealth of language data literally at our fingertips is enormous. This has triggered the development of appropriate tools to explore these vast data sets.
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    Australia and New Guinea
    Baker, B ; Donohue, M ; Fletcher, J ; Gussenhoven, C ; Chen, A (Oxford University Press, 2021)

    This handbook presents detailed accounts of current research in all aspects of language prosody, with chapters written by leading experts from various disciplines. The last four decades have seen major theoretical and empirical breakthroughs in the field, many of them informed by interdisciplinary approaches, as reflected in this volume. Following an introductory chapter covering the fundamentals of language prosody research, Parts II and III explore prosody in speech production and in relation to linguistic structure. Part IV provides overviews of prosodic systems across the world, with case studies from Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia and the Pacific, and the Americas. The chapters in Parts V, VI, and VII investigate prosody in communication, in language processing, and in language acquisition (respectively), while Part VIII examines prosody in technology and the arts.

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    The AutosegmentalMetrical Theory of Intonational Phonology
    Arvaniti, A ; Fletcher, J ; Gussenhoven, C ; Chen, A (Oxford University Press, USA, 2021-01-07)
    CHAPTER 6 THE AUTOSEGMENTALMETRICAL THEORY OF INTONATIONAL PHONOLOGY AMALIA ARVANITI AND JANET FLETCHER 6.1 INTRODUCTION THE autosegmental - metrical theory of intonational phonology ( henceforth AM )
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    Visible Talk: Looking at Australian Indigenous Sign Languages
    Green, J ; McFarlane, K (Ian Potter Museum of Art, 2021)