School of Languages and Linguistics - Research Publications

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    Introduction: Postcolonial realms of memory in the francophone world
    Lewis, J ; Wimbush, A (Liverpool University Press, 2016-01-06)
    In September 2020, the mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, announced plans to unveil a statute of Solitude, a former slave who fought against the French reinstatement of slavery in Guadeloupe in 1802. Solitude was arrested during the revolt, sentenced to death, and hanged. The inauguration of a statue in her memory would constitute the first statue of a black woman to be put up in the French capital.
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    Language contact in North Sulawesi: Preliminary observations
    Brickell, T (Research Institute for Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa (ILCAA), 2020-03-31)
    Categorised as a Pidgin Derived Malay ( PDM ), Manado Malay ( MM ) is spoken throughout northern Sulawesi and on islands to the south of the southern Philippines. After originally functioning as regional lingua franca, it is now well established as the first language of up to one million people. This paper examines the language-contact situation between MM and two indigenous languages with a long presence in the region. Despite centuries of continued close contact, an examination of a range of typological features reveals minimal shared features, almost none of which have arisen through borrowing. These results corroborate multiple theories relating to language-contact outcomes, in particular the availability of different structural features for borrowing, the likely direction of any transfer, and the effect of both linguistic and non-linguistic factors on the potential for intense bilingualism.
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    Reflections on software and technology for language documentation
    Arkhipov, A ; Thieberger, N ( 2020-01-01)
    Technological developments in the last decades enabled an unprecedented growth in volumes and quality of collected language data. Emerging challenges include ensuring the longevity of the records, making them accessible and reusable for fellow researchers as well as for the speech communities. These records are robust research data on which verifiable claims can be based and on which future research can be built, and are the basis for revitalization of cultural practices, including language and music performance. Recording, storage and analysis technologies become more lightweight and portable, allowing language speakers to actively participate in documentation activities. This also results in growing needs for training and support, and thus more interaction and collaboration between linguists, developers and speakers. Both cutting-edge speech technologies and crowdsourcing methods can be effectively used to overcome bottlenecks between different stages of analysis. While the endeavour to develop a single all-purpose integrated workbench for documentary linguists may not be achievable, investing in robust open interchange formats that can be accessed and enriched by independent pieces of software seems more promising for the near future.
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    Transhispanic Food Cultural Studies: Defining the Subfield
    Ingram, R ; Anderson, L (Taylor and Francis Group, 2020)
    This introductory article argues for making food central to a praxis of cultural studies in the transhispanic world and the importance of inserting Hispanist voices into the arena of food studies scholarship more broadly. Articles in this Special Issue illustrate that foodways of the transhispanic world are heterogeneous and conflicted. Yet, food discourses allow us to study how people think with food, using it to mark identities, to establish power relationships and to dispute them. Articles in this collection demonstrate how transnational forces condition the food cultures and discourses of this context. They also highlight culinary nationalism and the inextricable links communities and nation-states construct and sustain between food and national cuisines from within and outside of nation-states or state-less nations. Both critical frameworks, the transnational—which engages imperial expansion, neocolonialism, globalization and migration—, and the national—in which foodways change in the context of intercultural encounters, are essential to understanding food cultures and their discursive and textual forms in this context.
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    Schematic diagrams in second language learning of English prepositions: a behavioral and event-related potential study
    Zhao, H ; Huang, S ; Zhou, Y ; Wang, R (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2020-09-01)
    In the current study of applied cognitive linguistics (CL), schematic diagrams that represent generalizations of physical-spatial experience were applied in a computer-based tutor that trained English prepositions for second language (L2) learners. Behavioral and electrophysiological (ERP) measures were used to examine whether schematic-diagram feedback provided by the tutor had an instructional advantage over the minimally informed correctness feedback. Behavioral results confirmed this prediction and further revealed that the treatment difference was more striking when the participants had a lower L2 proficiency. The ERP results also supported the prediction. Violation uses of prepositions yielded an N270 and an N400. Schematic-diagram feedback motivated significant changes in brain potentials, whereas correctness feedback failed to do so. Overall, our findings suggest that CL-inspired instruction of a relatively short duration led to significant improvements in learners’ behavioral productive performance and in their sensitivity to semantic violation of preposition use during online sentence processing. The study provided strong neurolinguistic evidence for CL-inspired pedagogy in supporting L2 learning.
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    I K E R G O N Z Á L E Z - A L L E N D E . Hombres en movimiento. Masculinidades españolas en los exilios y emigraciones, 1939-1999. West Lafayette, Indiana: Purdue UP, 2018. xi + 309 pp.
    Martínez-Expósito, A (University of Ottawa Library, 2020-01-01)
    Reseña de Hombres en movimiento. Masculinidades españolas en los exilios y emigraciones, 1939-1999 de Iker González-Allende.
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    «Дом для Кузьки». Анимация в обучении русскому языку детей-билингвов 6–7 лет (развивающий урок)
    Kabiak, N ; Koudrjavtseva, E (Pushkin State Russian Language Institute, 2014)
    The following article deals with the method of employing animated cartoon at preschool and primary school level for teaching Russian language and culture to bilingual children. An example of a developmental lesson for children of 6–7 years of age based on the animated cartoon “A house for Kuzka” is presented here.
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    Советские кинофильмы на уроке РКИ: комедия Л. Гайдая «Иван Васильевич меняет профессию»
    Kabiak, N (Pushkin State Russian Language Institute, 2018)
    The author of the article argues the necessity of Soviet feature film usage at Russian as a foreign language classroom. A teaching material for instructors is presented based on L. Gaidai´s comedy Ivan Vasilievich changes profession.
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    Three readings of M.Bulgakov's play 'Ivan Vasilievich'
    Kabiak, N (Sokolova M.V., 2016)
    This article considers three readings of Bulgakov’s play ‘Ivan Vasilievich’. The first occurred in 1930s when the play was banned by Soviet censors. At that time, it would have contained much symbolism and meaning for the readers, who, like those in the play, were trapped in an oppressive dictatorship. A second reading – an interpretation of ‘Ivan Vasilievich’ occurred when the comedy ‘Ivan Vasilievich changes profession’ – based on Bulgakov’s play was filmed by the Soviet director Leonid Gaidai in 1973. Through this reading symbols and allusions drawn by Bulgakov became known to millions of Soviet citizens. A third reading considers the contemporary Russian language speaker, who today quotes Bulgakov’s and Gaidai’s lines from ‘Ivan Vasilievich’ and its’ adaptation in day-to-day life. This article will hereafter refer to these phrases as ‘winged phrases’ – they have taken flight from their original source and embedded themselves in vernacular speech.
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    Prosodically Conditioned Consonant Duration in Djambarrpuyŋu.
    Jepson, K ; Fletcher, J ; Stoakes, H (SAGE Publications, 2019-03-01)
    Cross-linguistically, segments typically lengthen because of proximity to prosodic events such as intonational phrase or phonological phrase boundaries, a phrasal accent, or due to lexical stress. Australian Indigenous languages have been claimed to operate somewhat differently in terms of prosodically conditioned consonant lengthening and strengthening. Consonants have been found to lengthen after a vowel bearing a phrasal pitch accent. It is further claimed that this post-tonic position is a position of prosodic strength in Australian languages. In this study, we investigate the effects of proximity to a phrasal pitch accent and prosodic constituent boundaries on the duration of stop and nasal consonants in words of varying lengths in Djambarrpuyŋu, an Australian Indigenous language spoken in northeast Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia. Our results suggest that the post-tonic consonant position does not condition longer consonant duration compared with other word-medial consonants, with one exception: Intervocalic post-tonic consonants in disyllabic words are significantly longer than word-medial consonants elsewhere. Therefore, it appears that polysyllabic shortening has a strong effect on segment duration in these data. Word-initial position did not condition longer consonant duration than word-medial position. Further, initial consonants in higher-level prosodic domains had shorter consonant duration compared with domain-medial word-initial consonants. By contrast, domain-final lengthening was observed in our data, with word-final nasals preceding a pause found to be significantly longer than all other consonants. Taken together, these findings for Djambarrpuyŋu suggest that, unlike other Australian languages, post-tonic lengthening is not a cue to prosodic prominence, whereas prosodic domain-initial and -final duration patterns of consonants are like those that have been observed in other languages of the world.