Medicine and Radiology - Research Publications

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    Metabolic patterns and seizure outcomes following anterior temporal lobectomy
    Cahill, V ; Sinclair, B ; Malpas, CB ; McIntosh, AM ; Chen, Z ; Vivash, LE ; O'Shea, MF ; Wilson, SJ ; Desmond, PM ; Berlangieri, SU ; Hicks, RJ ; Rowe, CC ; Morokoff, AP ; King, JA ; Fabinyi, GC ; Kaye, AH ; Kwan, P ; Berkovic, SF ; O'Brien, TJ (WILEY, 2019-02-01)
    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the relationship between the interictal metabolic patterns, the extent of resection of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18 FDG-PET) hypometabolism, and seizure outcomes in patients with unilateral drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) following anterior temporal lobe (TL) resection. METHODS: Eighty-two patients with hippocampal sclerosis or normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, concordant 18 FDG-PET hypometabolism, and at least 2 years of postoperative follow-up were included in this 2-center study. The hypometabolic regions in each patient were identified with reference to 20 healthy controls (p < 0.005). The resected TL volume and the volume of resected TL PET hypometabolism (TLH) were calculated from the pre- and postoperative MRI scans coregistered with interictal 18 FDG-PET. RESULTS: Striking differences in metabolic patterns were observed depending on the lateralization of the epileptogenic TL. The extent of the ipsilateral TLH was significantly greater in left MTLE patients (p < 0.001), whereas right MTLE patients had significantly higher rates of contralateral (CTL) TLH (p = 0.016). In right MTLE patients, CTL hypometabolism was the strongest predictor of an unfavorable seizure outcome, associated with a 5-fold increase in the likelihood of seizure recurrence (odds ratio [OR] = 4.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07-22.39, p = 0.04). In left MTLE patients, greater extent of resection of ipsilateral TLH was associated with lower rates of seizure recurrence (p = 0.004) in univariate analysis; however, its predictive value did not reach statistical significance (OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.90-1.02, p = 0.19). INTERPRETATION: The difference in metabolic patterns depending on the lateralization of MTLE may represent distinct epileptic networks in patients with right versus left MTLE, and can guide preoperative counseling and surgical planning. Ann Neurol 2019; 1-10 ANN NEUROL 2019;85:241-250.
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    A continuum of T-2(*) components: Flexible fast fraction mapping in sodium MRI
    Syeda, W ; Blunck, Y ; Kolbe, S ; Cleary, JO ; Johnston, LA (WILEY, 2019-06-01)
    PURPOSE: Parameter mapping in sodium MRI data is challenging due to inherently low SNR and spatial resolution, prompting the need to employ robust models and estimation techniques. This work aims to develop a continuum model of sodium T2* -decay to overcome the limitations of the commonly employed bi-exponential models. Estimates of mean T2* -decay and fast component fraction in tissue are emergent from the inferred continuum model. METHODS: A closed-form continuum model was derived assuming a gamma distribution of T2* components. Sodium MRI was performed on four healthy human subjects and a phantom consisting of closely packed vials filled with an aqueous solution of varying sodium and agarose concentrations. The continuum model was applied to the phantom and in vivo human multi-echo 7T data. Parameter maps by voxelwise model-fitting were obtained. RESULTS: The continuum model demonstrated comparable estimation performance to the bi-exponential model. The parameter maps provided improved contrast between tissue structures. The fast component fraction, an indicator of the heterogeneity of localised sodium motion regimes in tissue, was zero in CSF and high in WM structures. CONCLUSIONS: The continuum distribution model provides high quality, high contrast parameter maps, and informative voxelwise estimates of the relative weighting between fast and slow decay components.
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    Magnetic resonance imaging for common peroneal nerve injury in trauma patients: Are routine knee sequences adequate for prediction of outcome?
    Thi, MAT ; Lim, BG ; Sheehy, R ; Robertson, PL (WILEY, 2019-02-01)
    INTRODUCTION: Common peroneal nerve (CPN) injury occurs in 10-40% of patients following knee dislocation. Is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using routine knee protocols able to adequately evaluate CPN injury and predict long-term outcome? METHODS: Trauma patients presenting for knee MRI at a single public hospital, between July 2007 and May 2017, were retrospectively identified using radiology and orthopaedic databases. Medical records were retrieved for clinical scores. MRI images were scored by two independent radiologists blinded to the clinical CPN status and scores correlated with initial clinical scores using the Pearson correlation coefficient. RESULTS: Final cohort included 107 patients (81 males and 26 females) with a mean age of 39 (range 19-81 years). MRI was considered to be adequate for coverage of the CPN in 84 patients. Fourteen patients had CPN injury clinically (seven complete and seven partial). Concordance between MRI scores and initial clinical scores was 0.456 (P = 0.01). MRI sensitivity and specificity for CPN injury on the 84 adequate scans were 54.5% and 93.2% respectively. All seven cases of partial CPN injury and three of seven cases of complete CPN injury recovered fully. High MRI scores of 5 and 8 were given for the two patients with a persisting complete CPN palsy. Highest scores for partial CPN injury subjects were 2 and 4. CONCLUSIONS: Magnetic resonance imaging using a routine knee protocol is not adequate for the assessment of CPN injury in many subjects. More specific MRI neural sequences with complete CPN coverage may be worth trialing.
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    Retrospective audit of patients referred for further treatment following Mohs surgery for non-melanoma skin cancer
    Wee, E ; Goh, MS ; Estall, V ; Tiong, A ; Webb, A ; Mitchell, C ; Murray, W ; Tran, P ; McCormack, CJ ; Henderson, M ; Hiscutt, EL (WILEY, 2018-11-01)
    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: To describe the characteristics, subsequent management and outcomes of patients referred for further management following Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patients referred to a quaternary cancer centre from 2000 to 2015. RESULTS: In total, 83 lesions in 82 patients were referred for further management; 52 (62%) were SCC and 80 (96%) were located in the head and neck. Reasons for referral included high-risk disease for consideration for adjuvant radiotherapy (37/83, 45%), inadequate resection (28/83, 34%) or recurrence following previous MMS (15/83, 17%). Fewer than 40% of the 69 referrals received from MMS surgeons included photos or an operative report and diagram. There was discordance in pathology opinion in 11 (13%) of cases. Histopathology from MMS was reviewed in eight cases and there was discordance with the in-hospital pathology opinion in six of these. In-hospital re-excision was performed in 19 cases and in five of these the pathology report on the paraffin-sectioned re-excised tissue was discordant with prior MMS assessment. Significantly, two cases were associated with a misinterpretation of lymphocytic infiltrate as residual disease in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). CONCLUSION: This study highlights some of the challenges and limitations of MMS. Early referral for multidisciplinary management is recommended when MMS resection margins are inadequate or uncertain, especially for high-risk SCC. We recommend that referrals be accompanied by histological material, as well as a detailed report with operative photos and diagrams. CLL can pose an intraoperative diagnostic challenge. Discrepancies in the interpretation of MMS slides present an opportunity for improvement, and our findings support the role of ongoing quality assurance programs.
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    Computer vs human: Deep learning versus perceptual training for the detection of neck of femur fractures
    Adams, M ; Chen, W ; Holcdorf, D ; McCusker, MW ; Howe, PDL ; Gaillard, F (WILEY, 2019-02-01)
    INTRODUCTION: To evaluate the accuracy of deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) for detecting neck of femur (NoF) fractures on radiographs, in comparison with perceptual training in medically-naïve individuals. METHODS: This study extends a previous study that conducted perceptual training in medically-naïve individuals for the detection of NoF fractures on a variety of dataset sizes. The same anteroposterior hip radiograph dataset was used to train two DCNNs (AlexNet and GoogLeNet) to detect NoF fractures. For direct comparison with perceptual training results, deep learning was completed across a variety of dataset sizes (200, 320 and 640 images) with images split into training (80%) and validation (20%). An additional 160 images were used as the final test set. Multiple pre-processing and augmentation techniques were utilised. RESULTS: AlexNet and GoogLeNet DCNNs NoF fracture detection accuracy increased with larger training dataset sizes and mildly with augmentation. Accuracy increased from 81.9% and 88.1% to 89.4% and 94.4% for AlexNet and GoogLeNet respectively. Similarly, the test accuracy for the perceptual training in top-performing medically-naïve individuals increased from 87.6% to 90.5% when trained on 640 images compared with 200 images. CONCLUSIONS: Single detection tasks in radiology are commonly used in DCNN research with their results often used to make broader claims about machine learning being able to perform as well as subspecialty radiologists. This study suggests that as impressive as recognising fractures is for a DCNN, similar learning can be achieved by top-performing medically-naïve humans with less than 1 hour of perceptual training.
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    Implications of the diagnostic criteria of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in clinical practice: Analysis from the Australian Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Registry
    Jo, HE ; Glaspole, I ; Goh, N ; Hopkins, PMA ; Moodley, Y ; Reynolds, PN ; Chapman, S ; Walters, EH ; Zappala, C ; Allan, H ; Macansh, S ; Grainge, C ; Keir, GJ ; Hayen, A ; Henderson, D ; Klebe, S ; Heinze, SB ; Miller, A ; Rouse, HC ; Duhig, E ; Cooper, WA ; Mahar, AM ; Ellis, S ; McCormack, SR ; Ng, B ; Godbolt, DB ; Corte, TJ (WILEY, 2019-04-01)
    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Current guidelines for the diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) provide specific criteria for diagnosis in the setting of multidisciplinary discussion (MDD). We evaluate the utility and reproducibility of these diagnostic guidelines, using clinical data from the Australian IPF Registry. METHODS: All patients enrolled in the registry undergo a diagnostic review whereby international IPF guidelines are applied via a registry MDD. We investigated the clinical applicability of these guidelines with regard to: (i) adherence to guidelines, (ii) Natural history of IPF diagnostic categories and (iii) Concordance for diagnostic features. RESULTS: A total of 417 participants (69% male, 70.6 ± 8.0 years) with a clinical diagnosis of IPF underwent MDD. The 23% of participants who did not meet IPF diagnostic criteria displayed identical disease behaviour to those with confirmed IPF. Honeycombing on radiology was associated with a worse prognosis and this translated into poorer prognosis in the 'definite' IPF group. While there was moderate agreement for IPF diagnostic categories, agreement for specific radiological features, other than honeycombing, was poor. CONCLUSION: In clinical practice, physicians do not always follow IPF diagnostic guidelines. We demonstrate a cohort of IPF patients who do not meet IPF diagnostic guideline criteria, based largely on their radiology and lack of lung biopsy, but who have outcomes identical to those with IPF.
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    Randomized and controlled study comparing patient controlled and radiologist controlled intra-procedural conscious sedation, using midazolam and fentanyl, for patients undergoing insertion of a central venous line.
    Clements, W ; Sneddon, D ; Kavnoudias, H ; Joseph, T ; Goh, GS ; Koukounaras, J ; Snow, T (Wiley, 2018-12)
    INTRODUCTION: Interventional Radiology procedures can provoke anxiety and may be painful. Current practice, Radiologist Controlled Sedation (RCS), involves titrating aliquots of midazolam and fentanyl to patient response but underdosing and overdosing may occur. This study tests a new method of titrating sedation/analgesia during the procedure, Patient Controlled Sedation (PCS), in which a combination of fentanyl and midazolam are administered using a patient-controlled analgesia pump. This allows the patient to self-control their sedation/analgesia during the procedure. METHODS: We performed a randomised control trial comparing the effects of pain, sedation, amnesia and overall patient satisfaction between PCS and RCS, by enrolling forty patients undergoing insertion of a tunnelled central line. RESULTS: Our results showed that PCS was safe, with no adverse events. PCS was effective in providing sedation, amnesia and overall pain relief comparable to RCS. There was no significant difference in dose given to patients using PCS or RCS. There was a tendency for patients in the PCS group to begin sedation later than those in the RCS group, but both were equally sedated during the procedure. We show that patients in the PCS group were very satisfied with the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: We show that PCS is non-inferior to RCS in terms of dosage given and degree of sedation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show intra-procedural PCS in an Interventional Radiology setting using midazolam and fentanyl as a randomised comparative trial. It has wide applicability in a procedural setting for very low cost and with minimal additional training required.
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    Absence of renal phenotype in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia
    Healy, L ; Nicholls, K ; Gibson, R ; Stella, D ; Bogwitz, M ; Taylor, J ; Walsh, M ; Donaldson, L ; Winship, I (WILEY, 2018-10-01)
    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia is characterised by abnormal blood vessel formation, producing telangiectasia and arteriovenous malformations in multiple organs. Information regarding possible renal involvement in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia is limited. This study assessed renal structure and function in 11 patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis and known arteriovenous malformations in lung, liver, gastrointestinal tract or brain. All had significant current or past epistaxis. Despite the vascularity of the kidneys, we found no evidence of renal involvement. This observation warrants further consideration.
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    Rare manifestation of Neurofibromatosis type 1: A plexiform neurofibroma involving the mediastinum and lungs with endobronchial neurofibromata
    Pascoe, HM ; Antippa, P ; Irving, L ; Christie, M ; McCusker, MW (WILEY, 2019-02-01)
    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a multisystem phakomatosis. The intrathoracic manifestations of NF1 are protean. We describe a rare case of a plexiform neurofibroma infiltrating the mediastinum and lungs with multiple endobronchial neurofibromata. To our knowledge, a mediastinal plexiform neurofibroma extending into the lungs on CT has not been reported.
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    Zero-gradient-excitation ramped hybrid encoding (zG(RF)-RHE) sodium MRI
    Blunck, Y ; Moffat, BA ; Kolbe, SC ; Ordidge, RJ ; Cleary, JO ; Johnston, LA (WILEY, 2019-02-01)
    PURPOSE: Fast bi-exponential transverse signal decay compounds sodium image quality. This work aims at enhancing image characteristics using a special case of ramped hybrid encoding (RHE). Zero-gradient-excitation (zGRF )-RHE provides (1) gradient-free excitation for high flip angle, artifact-free excitation profiles and (2) gradient ramping during dead-time for the optimization of encoding time (tenc ) to reduce T2* signal decay influence during acquisition. METHODS: Radial zGRF -RHE and standard radial UTE were investigated over a range of receiver bandwidths in simulations, phantom and in vivo brain experiments. Central k-space in zGRF -RHE was acquired through single point measurements at the minimum achievable TE. T2* blurring artifacts and image SNR and CNR were assessed. RESULTS: zGRF -RHE enabled 90° flip angle artifact-free excitation, whereas gradient pre-ramping provided greater tenc efficiency for any readout bandwidths. Experiments confirmed simulation results, revealing sharper edge characteristics particularly at short readout durations (TRO ). Significant SNR improvements of up to 4.8% were observed for longer TRO . CONCLUSION: zGRF -RHE allows for artifact-free high flip angle excitation with time-efficient encoding improving on image characteristics. This hybrid encoding concept with gradient pre-ramping is trajectory independent and can be introduced in any center-out UTE trajectory design.