Melbourne Dental School - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 773
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    PROBE 2023 guidelines for reporting observational studies in Endodontics: A consensus-based development study
    Nagendrababu, V ; Duncan, HF ; Fouad, AF ; Kirkevang, L-L ; Parashos, P ; Pigg, M ; Vaeth, M ; Jayaraman, J ; Suresh, N ; Arias, A ; Wigsten, E ; Dummer, PMH (Wiley, 2023-03)
    Observational studies are non-interventional studies that establish the prevalence and incidence of conditions or diseases in populations or analyse the relationship between health status and other variables. They also facilitate the development of specific research questions for future randomized trials or to answer important scientific questions when trials are not possible to carry out. This article outlines the previously documented consensus-based approach by which the Preferred Reporting items for Observational studies in Endodontics (PROBE) 2023 guidelines were developed. A steering committee of nine members was formed, including the project leaders (PD, VN). The steering committee developed an initial checklist by combining and adapting items from the STrengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist and the Clinical and Laboratory Images in Publications (CLIP) principles, as well as adding several new items specifically for the specialty of Endodontics. The steering committee then established a PROBE Delphi Group (PDG) and a PROBE Online Meeting Group (POMG) to obtain expert input and feedback on the preliminary draft checklist. The PDG members participated in an online Delphi process to reach consensus on the clarity and suitability of the items present in the PROBE checklist. The POMG then held detailed discussions on the PROBE checklist generated through the online Delphi process. This online meeting was held via the Zoom platform on 7th October 2022. Following this meeting, the steering committee revised the PROBE checklist, which was piloted by several authors when preparing a manuscript describing an observational study for publication. The PROBE 2023 checklist consists of 11 sections and 58 items. Authors are now encouraged to adopt the PROBE 2023 guidelines, which will improve the overall reporting quality of observational studies in Endodontics. The PROBE 2023 checklist is freely available and can be downloaded from the PRIDE website (https://pride-endodonticguidelines.org/probe/).
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    PROBE 2023 guidelines for reporting observational studies in endodontics: Explanation and elaboration
    Nagendrababu, V ; Duncan, HFF ; Fouad, AFF ; Kirkevang, L-L ; Parashos, P ; Pigg, M ; Vaeth, M ; Jayaraman, J ; Suresh, N ; Jakovljevic, A ; Dummer, PMH (Wiley, 2023-06)
    Observational studies play a critical role in evaluating the prevalence and incidence of conditions or diseases in populations as well as in defining the benefits and potential hazards of health-related interventions. There are currently no reporting guidelines for observational studies in the field of Endodontics. The Preferred Reporting Items for study Designs in Endodontology (PRIDE) team has developed and published new reporting guidelines for observational-based studies called the 'Preferred Reporting items for OBservational studies in Endodontics (PROBE) 2023' guidelines. The PROBE 2023 guidelines were developed exclusively for the speciality of Endodontics by integrating and adapting the 'STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE)' checklist and the 'Clinical and Laboratory Images in Publications (CLIP)' principles. The recommendations of the Guidance for Developers of Health Research Reporting Guidelines were adhered to throughout the process of developing the guidelines. The purpose of this document is to serve as a guide for authors by providing an explanation for each of the items in the PROBE 2023 checklist along with relevant examples from the literature. The document also offers advice to authors on how they can address each item in their manuscript before submission to a journal. The PROBE 2023 checklist is freely accessible and downloadable from the PRIDE website (http://pride-endodonticguidelines.org/probe/).
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma diagnosis from tissue metabolic profiling
    Wang, S ; Li, K ; Zhao, T ; Sun, Y ; Zeng, T ; Wu, Y ; Ding, L ; Huang, X ; Celentano, A ; Yang, X ; Hu, Q ; Ni, Y (WILEY, 2023-07-24)
    OBJECTIVE: Disease metabolomes have been studied for identifying diagnostic and predictive biomarkers of pathology. Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is one of the most prevalent subtypes of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, yet the profile and diagnostic value of its tissue metabolite are unclear. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Tumor tissue samples and matched normal mucosal tissue samples were collected from 40 OTSCC patients. Untargeted metabolic analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, in positive and negative ion modes, was used to identify dysregulated metabolites in OTSCC. Further, utilizing LASSO regression and receiver operating characteristic analyses, biomarker metabolites were selected and validated, and a diagnostic model was established. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety metabolites were detected. The OTSCC had a total of 89 dysregulated metabolites, of which 73 were elevated. A diagnostic panel of nine metabolites was subsequently created that could accurately identify OTSCC with 100% sensitivity of 100%, 100% specificity and an AUC of 1.00. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified distinct metabolic characteristics of OTSCC and established a diagnostic model. Our research also contributes to the investigation of the pathogenesis of OTSCC.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Radiographic alveolar bone assessment in correlation with primary implant stability: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Putra, RH ; Cooray, U ; Nurrachman, AS ; Yoda, N ; Judge, R ; Putri, DK ; Astuti, ER (Wiley, 2024-01)
    INTRODUCTION: The radiographic examination of alveolar bone using 3D radiographic examination is essential in dental implant treatment planning. Our study aimed to systematically review and quantitatively analyze the correlation between alveolar bone parameters, specifically bone density and cortical bone thickness, assessed using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and/or multidetector computed tomography (MDCT); and primary implant stability (PIS) determined using implant stability quotient (ISQ), Periotest® value (PTV), and insertion torque value (ITV). METHODS: This review was registered in the PROSPERO database (registration number CRD42022307245). An electronic literature search was conducted on the PubMed, SCOPUS, and Web of Science databases for papers published until February 2022. The Quality Assessment in Prognostic Studies (QUIPS) tool was used to assess risk of bias. Meta-analyses were conducted to calculate the estimated average correlation coefficient based on a multilevel random-effects model, followed by subgroup analysis. RESULTS: Twenty-six studies were included in this review, consisting of 17 prospective cohort studies, eight retrospective cohort studies, and one nonrandomized controlled trial. A total of 3109 implants placed in 1171 subjects were analyzed. Twenty-three studies were evaluated using meta-analysis. The alveolar bone condition was significantly correlated with ISQ (r = 0.60; p < .001), IT (r = 0.52; p < .001), and PTV (r = -0.42; p < .05). CONCLUSION: Alveolar bone condition is significantly associated with PIS. Low bone density and thin cortical bone can lead to low PIS; therefore, modification of treatment planning and surgical procedures might be needed to avoid poor osseointegration.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Global cone-beam computed tomography adoption, usage and scan interpretation preferences of dentists and endodontists
    Cheung, MC ; Peters, OA ; Parashos, P (Wiley, 2024-02)
    AIM: This study investigated the adoption of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) by dentists and endodontists around the world, including their preferences in endodontic CBCT usage. METHODOLOGY: An online questionnaire surveyed dental association members in Australia and New Zealand, and endodontic association members in Australia, Britain, Canada, Italy, New Zealand and the USA, about their CBCT training history, considerations in acquisition/interpretation, access to and usage of CBCT, preferred scan interpreter, and preferred endodontic scan settings. Data were analysed with Chi-squared, independent sample t-tests, Cochran's Q and McNemar's tests. RESULTS: Responses from 578 endodontic specialists or postgraduates (Group E) and 185 non-endodontic dentists (Group NE) were included. Continuing professional education (CPE) was the most common source of CBCT training (69.2%). Factors considered in CBCT acquisition/interpretation included beam hardening (75.4%), radiation exposure (61.1%) and patient movement (58.3%). Group E reported higher CBCT usage (90.8%) than Group NE (45.4%, p < .001) and greater workplace access to CBCT (81.1% vs. 25.9%, p < .001). Scans were interpreted by the respondent in most workplace scans (83.3%) and externally taken scans (60.5%); Group E were significantly more likely to interpret themselves than Group NE. Small field of view (83.6%) and high resolution (86.6%) were most preferred as settings for endodontic CBCTs; Group NE were less likely to choose these settings. There were some geographic variations within Group E. CONCLUSIONS: CBCT training was most commonly acquired via CPE. Endodontic respondents reported very high CBCT usage and access in the workplace. There are educational implications regarding CBCT limitations, appropriate applications and interpretation.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Where will the next 3 years lead us?
    Celentano, A (Wiley, 2024-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Maxillonasal dysplasia (Binder syndrome): a lateral cephalometric assessment.
    Carach, B ; Woods, M ; Scott, P (Walter de Gruyter GmbH, 2002-11)
    Binder syndrome or maxillonasal dysplasia was first described by Binder in 1962, and is a disorder characterised by nasomaxillary hypoplasia. The records of 33 patients who had been diagnosed clinically with Binder syndrome at the Royal Children's Hospital of Melbourne were examined. Of these 33 patients, 14 were selected because they met the incusion criteria: that they had not had prior surgical and/or orthodontic treatment, and that high-quality lateral cephalometric radiographs were available. The craniofacial morphology of these patients was determined on lateral cephalometric radiographs and compared with published age- and sex-matched norms. In agreement with published studies, the anteroposterior lengths of the anterior cranial base and maxilla were reduced, and the majority of patients had a Class III skeletal relationship. Although the lower incisors tended to be prominent, both overjet and overbite 'ell within the ranges for the normal population. Despite the fact that the orthodontic and surgical treatment for patients with Binder syndrome is normally carried out within specialised units, clinicians should be aware of the variety of ways in which this condition may present.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Regulation of the endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin 7 by colony-stimulating factor 1 in macrophages
    Achuthan, A ; Masendycz, P ; Lopez, JA ; Nguyen, T ; James, DE ; Sweet, MJ ; Hamilton, JA ; Scholz, GM (AMER SOC MICROBIOLOGY, 2008-10)
    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) is the main growth factor controlling the development of macrophages from myeloid progenitor cells. However, CSF-1 also regulates some of the key effector functions of macrophages (e.g., phagocytosis and cytokine secretion). The endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin 7 (Stx7) regulates vesicle trafficking events involved in phagocytosis and cytokine secretion. Therefore, we investigated the ability of CSF-1 to regulate Stx7. CSF-1 upregulated Stx7 expression in primary mouse macrophages; it also upregulated expression of its SNARE partners Vti1b and VAMP8 but not Stx8. Additionally, CSF-1 induced the rapid serine phosphorylation of Stx7 and enhanced its binding to Vti1b, Stx8, and VAMP8. Bioinformatics analysis and results from experiments with kinase inhibitors suggested the CSF-1-induced phosphorylation of Stx7 was mediated by protein kinase C and Akt in response to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation. Based on mutagenesis studies, CSF-1 appeared to increase the binding of Stx7 to its SNARE partners by inducing the phosphorylation of serine residues in the Habc domain and/or "linker" region of Stx7. Thus, CSF-1 is a key regulator of Stx7 expression and function in macrophages. Furthermore, the effects of CSF-1 on Stx7 may provide a mechanism for the regulation of macrophage effector functions by CSF-1.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Engineering highly effective antimicrobial selenium nanoparticles through control of particle size
    Huang, T ; Holden, JA ; Heath, DE ; O'Brien-Simpson, NM ; O'Connor, AJ (Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019-08-21)
    The overuse of antibiotics has induced the rapid development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. As a result, antibiotic efficacy has become limited, and infection with multidrug-resistant bacteria is considered to be one of the largest global human health threats. Consequently, new, effective and safe antimicrobial agents need to be developed urgently. One promising candidate to address this requirement is selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs), which are made from the essential dietary trace element Se and have antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. The size of nanomaterials can strongly affect their biophysical properties and functions; however, the effects of the size of Se NPs on their antibacterial efficacy has not been systematically investigated. Therefore, in this work, spherical Se NPs ranging from 43 to 205 nm in diameter were fabricated, and their mammalian cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity as a function of their size were systematically studied. The antibacterial activity of the Se NPs was shown to be strongly size dependent, with 81 nm Se NPs showing the maximal growth inhibition and killing effect of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA). The Se NPs were shown to have multi-modal mechanisms of action that depended on their size, including depleting internal ATP, inducing ROS production, and disrupting membrane potential. All the Se NPs were non-toxic towards mammalian cells up to 25 μg mL−1. Furthermore, the MIC value for the 81 nm particles produced in this research is 16 ± 7 μg mL−1, significantly lower than previously reported MIC values for Se NPs. This data illustrates that Se NP size is a facile yet critical and previously underappreciated parameter that can be tailored for maximal antimicrobial efficacy. We have identified that using Se NPs with a size of 81 nm and concentration of 10 μg mL−1 shows promise as a safe and efficient way to kill S. aureus without damaging mammalian cells.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Antimicrobial nanoparticle coatings for medical implants: Design challenges and prospects
    Li, X ; Huang, T ; Heath, DE ; O'Brien-Simpson, NM ; O'Connor, AJ (AMER INST PHYSICS, 2020-11)
    Microbial colonization, infection, and biofilm formation are major complications in the use of implants and are the predominant risk factors in implant failure. Although aseptic surgery and the administration of antimicrobial drugs may reduce the risk of infection, the systemic use of antibiotics can lead to a lack of efficacy, an increase in the risk of tissue toxicity, and the development of drug-resistant infections. To reduce implant-related infections, antimicrobial materials are increasingly being investigated and applied to implant surfaces using various methods depending on the agents and their microbicidal mechanisms. Through the development of biomaterials and nanotechnology, antimicrobial nanoparticles are becoming promising candidates for implant coatings, as their multifactorial antimicrobial mechanisms combat microbial adherence, viability, and biofilm formation. Despite their antimicrobial promise, the application of nanoparticles onto implant surfaces while retaining their antimicrobial potency faces many challenges. Herein, we review the potential and challenges associated with the design and implementation of antimicrobial nanoparticle coatings for the medical implant industry, particularly focusing on manufacturing considerations, sterilization, long-term stability, protein fouling, regulation, and safety, with a view to providing researchers the necessary tools to aid the translation of materials from the bench to the clinic.