Physiology - Research Publications

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    The Impact of Frailty on the Effectiveness and Safety of Intensive Glucose Control and Blood Pressure-Lowering Therapy for People With Type 2 Diabetes: Results From the ADVANCE Trial
    Nguyen, TN ; Harris, K ; Woodward, M ; Chalmers, J ; Cooper, M ; Hamet, P ; Harrap, S ; Heller, S ; MacMahon, S ; Mancia, G ; Marre, M ; Poulter, N ; Rogers, A ; Williams, B ; Zoungas, S ; Chow, CK ; Lindley, RI (AMER DIABETES ASSOC, 2021-07-01)
    OBJECTIVE: To develop a frailty index (FI) and explore the relationship of frailty to subsequent adverse outcomes on the effectiveness and safety of more intensive control of both blood glucose and blood pressure (BP), among participants with type 2 diabetes in the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the effectiveness and safety of intensive glucose control and BP intervention according to frailty (defined as FI >0.21) status. The primary outcomes were macro- and microvascular events. The secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, severe hypoglycemia, and discontinuation of BP treatment due to hypotension/dizziness. RESULTS: There were 11,140 participants (mean age, 65.8 years; 42.5% women, 25.7% frail). Frailty was an independent predictor of all primary outcomes and secondary outcomes. The effect of intensive glucose treatment on primary outcomes showed some evidence of attenuation in the frail: hazard ratios for combined major macro- and microvascular events 1.03 (95% CI 0.90-1.19) in the frail versus 0.84 (95% CI 0.74-0.94) in the nonfrail (P = 0.02). A similar trend was observed with BP intervention. Severe hypoglycemia rates (per 1,000 person-years) were higher in the frail: 8.39 (6.15-10.63) vs. 4.80 (3.84-5.76) in nonfrail (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in discontinuation of BP treatment between frailty groups. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to retrospectively estimate frailty in a trial population, and this FI identified those at higher risk of poor outcomes. Participants with frailty had some attenuation of benefit from intensive glucose-lowering and BP-lowering treatments.
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    Polygenic risk scores predict diabetes complications and their response to intensive blood pressure and glucose control
    Tremblay, J ; Haloui, M ; Attaoua, R ; Tahir, R ; Hishmih, C ; Harvey, F ; Marois-Blanchet, F-C ; Long, C ; Simon, P ; Santucci, L ; Hizel, C ; Chalmers, J ; Marre, M ; Harrap, S ; Cifkova, R ; Krajcoviechova, A ; Matthews, DR ; Williams, B ; Poulter, N ; Zoungas, S ; Colagiuri, S ; Mancia, G ; Grobbee, DE ; Rodgers, A ; Liu, L ; Agbessi, M ; Bruat, V ; Fave, M-J ; Harwood, MP ; Awadalla, P ; Woodward, M ; Hussin, JG ; Hamet, P (SPRINGER, 2021-07-06)
    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Type 2 diabetes increases the risk of cardiovascular and renal complications, but early risk prediction could lead to timely intervention and better outcomes. Genetic information can be used to enable early detection of risk. METHODS: We developed a multi-polygenic risk score (multiPRS) that combines ten weighted PRSs (10 wPRS) composed of 598 SNPs associated with main risk factors and outcomes of type 2 diabetes, derived from summary statistics data of genome-wide association studies. The 10 wPRS, first principal component of ethnicity, sex, age at onset and diabetes duration were included into one logistic regression model to predict micro- and macrovascular outcomes in 4098 participants in the ADVANCE study and 17,604 individuals with type 2 diabetes in the UK Biobank study. RESULTS: The model showed a similar predictive performance for cardiovascular and renal complications in different cohorts. It identified the top 30% of ADVANCE participants with a mean of 3.1-fold increased risk of major micro- and macrovascular events (p = 6.3 × 10-21 and p = 9.6 × 10-31, respectively) and a 4.4-fold (p = 6.8 × 10-33) higher risk of cardiovascular death. While in ADVANCE overall, combined intensive blood pressure and glucose control decreased cardiovascular death by 24%, the model identified a high-risk group in whom it decreased the mortality rate by 47%, and a low-risk group in whom it had no discernible effect. High-risk individuals had the greatest absolute risk reduction with a number needed to treat of 12 to prevent one cardiovascular death over 5 years. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: This novel multiPRS model stratified individuals with type 2 diabetes according to risk of complications and helped to target earlier those who would receive greater benefit from intensive therapy.
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    Sex differences in risk factors for cognitive decline and dementia, including death as a competing risk, in individuals with diabetes: Results from the ADVANCE trial
    Gong, J ; Harris, K ; Hackett, M ; Peters, SAE ; Brodaty, H ; Cooper, M ; Hamet, P ; Harrap, S ; Mancia, G ; MacMahon, S ; Chalmers, J ; Woodward, M (WILEY, 2021-05-04)
    AIM: To estimate the associations between risk factors and cognitive decline (CD)/dementia, and the sex differences in these risk factors in individuals with type 2 diabetes, while accounting for the competing risk of death. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) trial of 11,140 individuals with type 2 diabetes was used to estimate the odds of CD/dementia using multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS: During a median 5-year follow-up, 1827 participants (43.2% women) had CD/dementia (1718 with CD only; 21 with dementia only; 88 with CD and dementia), and 929 (31.0% women) died without CD/dementia. Women had lower odds of CD/dementia than men (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval], 0.88 [0.77, 1.00]); older age, higher total cholesterol, HbA1c, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, moderately increased albumin-creatinine ratio, stroke/transient ischaemic attack and retinal disease were each associated with greater odds of CD/dementia; higher years at education completion, baseline cognitive function, taller stature and current alcohol use were inversely associated. Higher waist circumference (women-to-men ratio of ORs [ROR], 1.05 [1.00, 1.10] per 5 cm) and presence of anxiety/depression (ROR, 1.28 [1.01, 1.63]) were associated with greater ORs for CD/dementia in women than men. CONCLUSIONS: Several risk factors were associated with CD/dementia. Higher waist circumference and mental health symptoms were more strongly associated with CD/dementia in women than men. Further studies should examine the mechanisms that underlie these sex differences.
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    Cardiac mechanical efficiency is preserved in primary cardiac hypertrophy despite impaired mechanical function
    Han, J-C ; Tran, K ; Crossman, DJ ; Curl, CL ; Koutsifeli, P ; Neale, JPH ; Li, X ; Harrap, SB ; Taberner, AJ ; Delbridge, LMD ; Loiselle, DS ; Mellor, KM (ROCKEFELLER UNIV PRESS, 2021-08-02)
    Increased heart size is a major risk factor for heart failure and premature mortality. Although abnormal heart growth subsequent to hypertension often accompanies disturbances in mechano-energetics and cardiac efficiency, it remains uncertain whether hypertrophy is their primary driver. In this study, we aimed to investigate the direct association between cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac mechano-energetics using isolated left-ventricular trabeculae from a rat model of primary cardiac hypertrophy and its control. We evaluated energy expenditure (heat output) and mechanical performance (force length work production) simultaneously at a range of preloads and afterloads in a microcalorimeter, we determined energy expenditure related to cross-bridge cycling and Ca2+ cycling (activation heat), and we quantified energy efficiency. Rats with cardiac hypertrophy exhibited increased cardiomyocyte length and width. Their trabeculae showed mechanical impairment, evidenced by lower force production, extent and kinetics of shortening, and work output. Lower force was associated with lower energy expenditure related to Ca2+ cycling and to cross-bridge cycling. However, despite these changes, both mechanical and cross-bridge energy efficiency were unchanged. Our results show that cardiac hypertrophy is associated with impaired contractile performance and with preservation of energy efficiency. These findings provide direction for future investigations targeting metabolic and Ca2+ disturbances underlying cardiac mechanical and energetic impairment in primary cardiac hypertrophy.
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    Sex-specific associations between cardiovascular risk factors and myocardial infarction in patients with type 2 diabetes: TheADVANCE-ONstudy
    Ohkuma, T ; Peters, SAE ; Jun, M ; Harrap, S ; Cooper, M ; Hamet, P ; Poulter, N ; Chalmers, J ; Woodward, M (WILEY, 2020-07-01)
    AIM: To examine possible sex differences in the excess risk of myocardial infarction (MI) consequent to a range of conventional risk factors in a large-scale international cohort of patients with diabetes, and to quantify these potential differences both on the relative and absolute scales. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven thousand and sixty-five participants (42% women) with type 2 diabetes in the ADVANCE trial and its post-trial follow-up study, ADVANCE-ON, were included. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for associations between risk factors and MI (fatal and non-fatal) by sex, and the women-to-men ratio of HRs (RHR). RESULTS: Over a median of 9.6 years of follow-up, 719 patients experienced MI. Smoking status, smoking intensity, higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), HbA1c, total and LDL cholesterol, duration of diabetes, triglycerides, body mass index (BMI) and lower HDL cholesterol were associated with an increased risk of MI in both sexes. Furthermore, some variables were associated with a greater relative risk of MI in women than men: RHRs were 1.75 (95% CI: 1.05-2.91) for current smoking, 1.53 (1.00-2.32) for former smoking, 1.18 (1.02-1.37) for SBP, and 1.13 (95% CI, 1.003-1.26) for duration of diabetes. Although incidence rates of MI were higher in men (9.3 per 1000 person-years) compared with women (5.8 per 1000 person-years), rate differences associated with risk factors were greater in women than men, except for HDL cholesterol and BMI. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with type 2 diabetes, smoking, higher SBP and longer duration of diabetes had a greater relative and absolute effect in women than men, highlighting the importance of routine sex-specific approaches and early interventions in women with diabetes.
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    Role of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in fetal programming.
    Shrestha, N ; Sleep, SL ; Cuffe, JSM ; Holland, OJ ; Perkins, AV ; Yau, SY ; McAinch, AJ ; Hryciw, DH (Wiley, 2020-05)
    Maternal nutrition plays a critical role in fetal development and can influence adult onset of disease. Linoleic acid (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) are major omega-6 (n-6) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), respectively, that are essential in our diet. LA and ALA are critical for the development of the fetal neurological and immune systems. However, in recent years, the consumption of n-6 PUFA has increased gradually worldwide, and elevated n-6 PUFA consumption may be harmful to human health. Consumption of diets with high levels of n-6 PUFA before or during pregnancy may have detrimental effects on fetal development and may influence overall health of offspring in adulthood. This review discusses the role of n-6 PUFA in fetal programming, the importance of a balance between n-6 and n-3 PUFAs in the maternal diet, and the need of further animal models and human studies that critically evaluate both n-6 and n-3 PUFA contents in diets.
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    The effect of high maternal linoleic acid on endocannabinoid signalling in rodent hearts.
    Sleep, SL ; Shrestha, N ; Cuffe, JSM ; Holland, OJ ; Headrick, JP ; McAinch, AJ ; Hryciw, DH (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2020-12)
    The endocannabinoid system (ECS), modulated by metabolites of linoleic acid (LA), is important in regulating cardiovascular function. In pregnancy, LA is vital for foetal development. We investigated the effects of elevated LA in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts in vitro and of a high linoleic acid (HLA, 6.21%) or low linoleic acid (LLA, 1.44%) diet during pregnancy in maternal and offspring hearts. H9c2 cell viability was reduced following LA exposure at concentrations between 300 and 1000 µM. HLA diet decreased cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) mRNA expression in foetal hearts from both sexes. However, HLA diet increased CB2 expression in maternal hearts. The mRNA expression of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in foetal hearts was higher in females than in males irrespective of diet and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) mRNA expression showed an interaction between diet and sex. Data indicate that a high LA diet alters cell viability and CB2 expression, potentially influencing cardiac function during pregnancy and development of the offspring's heart.
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    Pregnancy and diet-related changes in the maternal gut microbiota following exposure to an elevated linoleic acid diet.
    Shrestha, N ; Sleep, SL ; Cuffe, JSM ; Holland, OJ ; McAinch, AJ ; Dekker Nitert, M ; Hryciw, DH (American Physiological Society, 2020-02-01)
    Dietary intakes of linoleic acid (LA) have increased, including in women of reproductive age. Changes in maternal gut microbiome have been implicated in the metabolic adaptions that occur during pregnancy. We aimed to investigate whether consumption of a diet with elevated LA altered fecal microbiome diversity before and during pregnancy. Female Wistar-Kyoto rats consumed a high-LA diet (HLA: 6.21% of energy) or a low-LA diet (LLA: 1.44% of energy) for 10 wk before mating and during pregnancy. DNA was isolated from fecal samples before pregnancy [embryonic day 0 (E0)], or during pregnancy at E10 and E20. The microbiome composition was assessed with 16S rRNA sequencing. At E0, the beta-diversity of LLA and HLA groups differed with HLA rats having significantly lower abundance of the genera Akkermansia, Peptococcus, Sutterella, and Xo2d06 but higher abundance of Butyricimonas and Coprococcus. Over gestation, in LLA but not HLA rats, there was a reduction in alpha-diversity and an increase in beta-diversity. In the LLA group, the abundance of Akkermansia, Blautia, rc4.4, and Streptococcus decreased over gestation, whereas Coprococcus increased. In the HLA group; only the abundance of Butyricimonas decreased. At E20, there were no differences in alpha- and beta-diversity, and the abundance of Roseburia was significantly increased in the HLA group. In conclusion, consumption of a HLA diet alters gut microbiota composition, as does pregnancy in rats consuming a LLA diet. In pregnancy, consumption of a HLA diet does not alter gut microbiota composition.
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    Potential biomarkers and challenges in glioma diagnosis, therapy and prognosis
    Kan, LK ; Drummond, K ; Hunn, M ; Williams, D ; O'Brien, TJ ; Monif, M (BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2020-08-01)
    Gliomas are the most common central nervous system malignancies and present with significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment modalities are currently limited to surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Increases in survival rate over the previous decades are negligible, further pinpointing an unmet clinical need in this field. There is a continual struggle with the development of effective glioma diagnostics and therapeutics, largely due to a multitude of factors, including the presence of the blood-brain barrier and significant intertumoural and intratumoural heterogeneity. Importantly, there is a lack of reliable biomarkers for glioma, particularly in aiding tumour subtyping and measuring response to therapy. There is a need for biomarkers that would both overcome the complexity of the disease and allow for a minimally invasive means of detection and analysis. This is a comprehensive review evaluating the potential of current cellular, proteomic and molecular biomarker candidates for glioma. Significant hurdles faced in glioma diagnostics and therapy are also discussed here.
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    Metabolic remodeling of dystrophic skeletal muscle reveals biological roles for dystrophin and utrophin in adaptation and plasticity
    Hardee, JP ; Martins, KJB ; Miotto, PM ; Ryall, JG ; Gehrig, SM ; Reljic, B ; Naim, T ; Chung, JD ; Trieu, J ; Swiderski, K ; Philp, AM ; Philp, A ; Watt, MJ ; Stroud, DA ; Koopman, R ; Steinberg, GR ; Lynch, GS (ELSEVIER, 2021-01-12)
    OBJECTIVES: Preferential damage to fast, glycolytic myofibers is common in many muscle-wasting diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Promoting an oxidative phenotype could protect muscles from damage and ameliorate the dystrophic pathology with therapeutic relevance, but developing efficacious strategies requires understanding currently unknown biological roles for dystrophin and utrophin in dystrophic muscle adaptation and plasticity. METHODS: Combining whole transcriptome RNA sequencing and mitochondrial proteomics with assessments of metabolic and contractile function, we investigated the roles of dystrophin and utrophin in fast-to-slow muscle remodeling with low-frequency electrical stimulation (LFS, 10 Hz, 12 h/d, 7 d/wk, 28 d) in mdx (dystrophin null) and dko (dystrophin/utrophin null) mice, two established preclinical models of DMD. RESULTS: Novel biological roles in adaptation were demonstrated by impaired transcriptional activation of estrogen-related receptor alpha-responsive genes supporting oxidative phosphorylation in dystrophic muscles. Further, utrophin expression in dystrophic muscles was required for LFS-induced remodeling of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, enhanced fiber respiration, and conferred protection from eccentric contraction-mediated damage. CONCLUSIONS: These findings reveal novel roles for dystrophin and utrophin during LFS-induced metabolic remodeling of dystrophic muscle and highlight the therapeutic potential of LFS to ameliorate the dystrophic pathology and protect from contraction-induced injury with important implications for DMD and related muscle disorders.